juan-gonzalez

If Latin America had not been pillaged by the U.S. capital since its independence, millions of desperate workers would not now be coming here in such numbers to reclaim a share of that wealth; and if the United States is today the world’s richest nation, it is in part because of the sweat and blood of the copper workers of Chile, the tin miners of Bolivia, the fruit pickers of Guatemala and Honduras, the cane cutters of Cuba, the oil workers of Venezuela and Mexico, the pharmaceutical workers of Puerto Rico, the ranch hands of Costa Rica and Argentina, the West Indians who died building the Panama Canal, and the Panamanians who maintained it.
—  Juan Gonzalez - Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America

The four most populous states– California, New York, Texas, and Florida–contain more than 60 percent of the nation’s Latinos. In both California and Texas, one of every four residents is Latino.
This demographic shift is so massive it is transforming the ethnic composition of the country and challenging key aspects of its accepted national identity, language, culture, and official history, a seismic social change that caught the power structures and institutions of U.S. society unprepared. Instead of seeking to address the causes of that change, those institutions attempted in the 1990s simply to repress and reverse it.
Not too long ago, Latin American was thought of as an exotic and beckoning backyard for U.S. power and influence, a series of nondescript banana republics and semicivilized nations were Americans often ventured for adventure or for vacations or to accumulate cheap land or make huge fortunes. The region’s hapless government became perpetual prey to the intrigues of competing circles of U.S. bankers and investors and to the gunboat diplomacy of U.S. presidents. But now Latino migrants, the product of those old inequities have invaded the North American garden, kitchen, and living room. We are overflowing its schools, even its jails.
That mushrooming presence has sparked enormous insecurity among citizens of European descent, a disturbing number of whom started to believe in the 1990s that the country was under attack by modern-day Huns, hordes of Spanish-speaking “barbarians at the gate.” They saw images of Mexican street gangs in Los Angelges and Phoenix, Puerto Rican unmarried mothers on welfare in New York and Boston, Colombian drug dealers in Miami, or illegal Central American laborers in Houston and San Francisco. These immigrants, they were told in countless news and were disproportionately swelling the ranks of the country’s poor.

(to be continued…)

—  Harvest of Empire.  Juan Gonzalez
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At a time of heated and divisive debate over immigration, the new feature-length documentary, “Harvest of Empire,” examines the direct connection between the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin America and the immigration crisis we face today. Based on the groundbreaking book by award-winning journalist and Democracy Now! co-host Juan González, “Harvest of Empire” takes an unflinching look at the role that U.S. economic and military interests played in triggering an unprecedented wave of migration that is transforming our nation’s cultural and economic landscape. González is a columnist at the New York Daily News and author of three other books, including “News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media.” We’re also joined by the film’s co-director, Eduardo López

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David Villa’s former club and international teammates send him messages congratulating him on his MLS MVP award.

If Latin America had not been pillaged by U.S. capital since its independence, millions of desperate workers would not now be coming here in such numbers to reclaim a share of that wealth; and if the United States is today the world’s richest nation, it is in part because of the sweat and blood of the copper workers of Chile, the tin miners of Bolivia, the fruit pickers of Guatemala and Honduras, the cane cutters of Cuba, the oil workers of Venezuela and Mexico, the pharmaceutical workers of Puerto Rico, the ranch hands of Costa Rica and Argentina, the West Indians who died building the Panama Canal, and the Panamanians who maintained it.
—  Juan Gonzalez, Introduction to Harvest of Empire
Steroid-stained slugger Jose Canseco revives MLB dream

LAS VEGAS – Jose Canseco sits at one of the two long poker tables in the living room of his Las Vegas home, his massive biceps bulging through his tank top, and he’s ready to take a swing at any topic thrown at him.

His perceived banishment from the game? He’ll give you chapter and verse on that.

Regrets over writing the book that made him a pariah in baseball? Yes, plenty.

Do steroid users belong in the Hall of Fame? Hell, yeah, and there are some in there already.

His chances of one day managing in the majors? Better than zero.

Blowing through the $46 million he made as a player? It’s easier than you think.

His choice of attire – tank top and skull cap – on his TV appearances? Fans love it.

Through a good portion of his 52 years on this planet – and some may suggest he belongs in another one – Canseco has earned a reputation for speaking his mind, and he did so for more than an hour in an interview with USA TODAY Sports.

His outspoken nature is part of what made Canseco attractive to the Oakland Athletics and their TV partner, NBC Sports California, who hired him to do pre- and postgame analysis on 25 of the team’s games this season.

This is his first job in the majors since, he believes, being forced into early retirement after the 2001 season at age 37 when no team would offer him a contract, even at the minimum salary.

Canseco is convinced he could have played another five years but was blackballed from the game because of his strong links to performance-enhancing drugs, which he chronicled in the 2005 book Juiced. He went down swinging, accusing big stars like former teammates Mark McGwire, Roger Clemens, Rafael Palmeiro, Juan Gonzalez, Ivan Rodriguez and Jason Giambi of using steroids. Many of his claims were later confirmed.

Canseco didn’t envision the day he would return to baseball’s good graces – he doesn’t think his current gig meets that description – but the A’s saw their former slugger as a great fit for their needs.

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Wildfires ravage central, south Chile

Fires have been raging in central and southern Chile, fanned by strong winds, hot temperatures and a prolonged drought. Emergency services have battled the flames nonstop for days with thousands of firefighters on the ground and helicopters and airplanes in the air. The forest fires have displaced thousands, killed people and destroyed entire villages. The multiple blazes have ravaged 680,000 acres (273,000 hectares) in just over a week. (AP/Getty)

Photos: (from top) REUTERS/Juan Gonzalez (3), AP Photo/Esteban Felix (3)

See more images of wildfires in Chile on Yahoo News

Venezuela Mayhem Right Now

NOTE: IF YOU SUPPORT THE CUBAN/VENEZUELA REGIME SKIP BY AND GO MAKE A LINE TO BUY MILK. I DO NOT NEED YOUR SORRY COMMENTS.

Things are not good in Venezuela right now. People are on the streets. Students, workers and citizens worried about the Cuban invasion march in more than 9 states. The police at this moment watch the TUPAMAROS, which is a Government backed thugs, shot and kidnap people protesting against Nicolas Maduro regime. All the newspapers are censored and the TV is afraid to report on any of the protest. Check Twitter and search #lasalida or #TUPAMAROS and you can see the mess in Venezuela.

My profile image is in support of those people back in my country protesting on the streets.

(vía Juan Gonzalez)

YOU CAN PARTICIPATE IN THIS ACTION FROM ANYWHERE - AS LONG AS YOU HAVE A PHONE!

The first time around, the phone zap tactic was extremely successful! With your support and solidarity the Ché Café was able to force the administration of UCSD to begin negotiations with the collective during last summer.

This time around, our intentions are not only to force the administration into serious negotiations, but also to put pressure on them to place a permanent stay on the eviction notice that has been issued against the Ché Collective.

Starting at 10 a.m., call Vice Chancellor of student affairs Juan Gonzalez and demand that:

1. UCSD place an immediate stay on eviction proceedings against the Ché Café.

2. Ché Café Collective be included included in upcoming Master Space Agreement negotiations.

VC Gonzalez phone number: (858) 534-4371

Don’t just call once! Keep calling!

Leave messages with his secretary.

Our goal is to overwhelm them - if they sound annoyed, it means that we are getting under their skin (exactly what we want to do).