juan nieve

Book recs for Hufflepuffs!

Gif source | More recs: hufflepuff (pt. 2), ravenclaw (pt. 1 and pt. 2), slytherin (pt. 1 and pt. 2), gryffindor (pt. 1 and pt. 2) | text by @viegsen and @juan-nieves

House traits: trustworthy, loyal, kind, just, friendly, patient, hardworking, dedicated, inclusive

  • FEMINISM IS FOR EVERYBODY, by bell hooks - non fiction - Hufflepuffs care about justice, equality and inclusion, and they aren’t afraid to fight for what’s right. Helga Hufflepuff never stood for discrimination of any kind and for this reason I would recommend this amazing and inspiring work by bell hooks, which presents a passionate theory of feminism sure to appeal to the socially-conscious Hufflepuff!
  • THE PRINCESS BRIDE, by William Goldman - fantasy - Adventures aren’t just for Gryffindors! And in any case, The Princess Bride is about lots of things, not least of all perseverance, endurance and working hard for revenge (like Inigo) and for true love (like Westley). A funny and hearwarming story that could be read aloud in the cosy Hufflepuff common room for everybody to enjoy.
  • A LITTLE PRINCESS, by Frances Hodgson Burnett - children’s - “I am a princess. All girls are. Even if they live in tiny old attics. Even if they dress in rags, even if they aren’t pretty, or smart, or young. They’re still princesses.” I dare you not to cry when reading the story of Sara Crewe, a kind-hearted girl who goes from the most pampered student in an all-girls school to the lowliest servant when her father dies, and stays just as loving, friendly, generous and patient, because even all the terrible things she suffers cannot change the fact that she’s a princess in her heart.
  • FANGIRL, by Rainbow Rowell - YA; romance - Cath is a Hufflepuff with crippling social anxiety. When she goes to college, she has to juggle the challenges of her new life, a bad home situation, a new distance from her twin sister, and a crush on her intimidating roomate’s cute boyfriend, Levi (also a total Hufflepuff). It can be quite sugary-sweet at times, but I think Hufflepuffs will appreciate the characters a lot.
  • PERSUASION, by Jane Austen - romance - Anne Elliot is unfailingly dedicated to her family. When she’s 19, she’s reluctantly persuaded that her engagement with naval officer Frederick Wentworth is beneath her family’s status, and gives up on her love. She spends years being treated terribly by her family but enduring it with the patience of Job. When Frederick reappears in her life, he’s rich and respectable, and looking for a wife, while Anne (at 27) is quite “on the shelf” by Regency standards, but strong, quietly dignified and much more mature than the girl she was. Could Frederick ever forgive her? Could Anne hope for a chance of happiness?
  • COTILLION, by Georgette Heyer - historical romance - Did you know that Georgette Heyer is the inventor of the Toaster Strudel Regency historical romance? Cotillion is absolutely hilarious (it’s actually more of a comedy than a romance, really) and follows Kitty and Freddy, who get up to all sorts of hijinks in London after getting fake-engaged. They are consistently underestimated by the people around them but are, of course, as trustworthy, kind, friendly and dependable as you’d expect from two Hufflepuff cuties!
  • SCANDAL IN SPRING, by Lisa Kleypas - historical romance - Daisy Bowman is a nice, romantic, kind girl who is told by her father that if she can’t find a husband by the end of Spring, she would have to marry the bridegroom of his choice, Matthew Swift, whom Daisy hasn’t seen in years, but considers to be cold, aloof and ruthless. As they reacquaint themselves, however, the idea of marrying Swift starts looking decidedly attractive…
  • RADIANCE, by Grace Draven - fantasy romance - Ildiko and Brishen are nobles who enter into an arranged marriage to seal an alliance between their kingdoms. Just a teeny, tiny, problem: Brishen and his people aren’t actually human. This is a cool twist on the Beauty and the Beast story because both parties think the other is a Beast. But Ildiko and Brishen are both decent people who try to make the best out of a difficult situation and end up forming a deep friendship. If being a Hufflepuff is all about accepting those who are different and not being judgmental, these two are definitely Hufflepuffs.
  • THE BOOK THIEF, by Markus Zusak - historical fiction - Liesel Meminger is a girl who comes into the care of Hans and Rosa Hubermann feeling like there’s not much in the world that isn’t scary or dangerous. However, through the patience, humor, warmth and kindness she finds in her new surroundings -even during WWII in Germany-, she slowly begins to see everything in a different light. This book is filled with tons of Hufflepuff characters that not only see the value of being accepting and compassionate, but of actually following those feelings with actions that benefit those that might need it most.
  • THE COLOR PURPLE, by Alice Walker - historical fiction - Set in rural Georgia in the 1930s, this epistolary novel tells the story of Celie, a black woman that has to live a life filled with as many hardships and heartbreaks as you could imagine. Don’t let that depressing summary convince you of not picking up this book though, because what makes it great is that it’s actually a story very much about the triumph of the human spirit. Celie sees the world in a really moving way, and it helps to show you just how big of an impact empathy and acceptance can make in someone’s life.
  • MAUS, by Art Spiegelman - graphic novel - This graphic novel set tells you the true story of Art Spiegelman’s father, who was a survivor of the Holocaust. Here you’ll find a man that, in true Hufflepuff fashion, works carefully and relentlessly to make the best he possibly can out of a horrible situation for himself and his family. As with most of literature set in or about this time period, you get to see how it in some ways shaped the man he was later in life, but that doesn’t prevent you from seeing just how intelligent and perseverant he always was.
  • THE HISTORY OF LOVE, by Nicole Krauss - fiction - I honestly think this book is better if you go into it not knowing much about it, but I’ll tell you this: it has 3 stories that are linked in one way or another, it’s a book about human relationships and the endurance of love, and it will probably make you very very sad and very happy at the same time.
  • UPROOTED, by Naomi Novik - fantasy; romance - This book may have been marketed as more of a romance but the most important relationship in it is the friendship between Agniezka and Kasia. You could argue Agniezka is actually a Gryffindor on account of the many brave deeds she performs to save her friend and her village but I just think she has a very laid-back, Hufflepuff vibe, and more than bravery it is her loyalty and empathy that define her.
  • DAUGHTER OF THE FOREST, by Juliet Marillier - fantasy - [tw: rape!!!] Sorcha, the protagonist, is very much a Hufflepuff. She is fiercely loyal to her six brothers and her people, and kind even to her enemies. She is really into plants and healing (herbology, anyone?) and always rushes to help those in need no matter their social station or if it will get her in trouble. And when her brothers are cursed she really goes above and beyond to save them, in an impressive display of patience and hard work.
Adultbooklr in 2016

Adultbooklr collectively hit a lot of milestones and discussed some great topics last year - from read alongs to discussions about classics to chats about cats and more, we are so grateful for another year with you. (Although, this “new year’s” post is pretty late, my apologies.)

But beyond Adultbooklr, we wanted input from the readers that make up this group about how they felt 2016 went in the book world. And there were a lot of feelings! JUST AS I LIKE IT. Here are the recommendations (and non-recommendations) that we got in response!

Favorite books published in 2016:

  • Yiddish for Pirates by Gary Barwin
  • The Raven King by Maggie Stiefvater
  • Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
  • His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet
  • The Vegetarian by Han Kang
  • A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas
  • A Gathering of Shadows by V. E. Schwab
  • Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo
  • Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
  • Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake
  • Buffering by Hannah Hart
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanathi
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien
  • What is Not Yours is not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi
  • Certainly, Possibly, You by @lissareedbooks
  • The Crown by Kiera Cass
  • Frogs and Kisses by Shanna Swendson
  • The Hating Game by Sally Thorne
  • The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin

Favorite books read in 2016:

  • Possession by A.S. Byatt
  • The Raven King by Maggie Stiefvater
  • Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
  • Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
  • The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall
  • The Vegetarian by Han Kang
  • The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
  • Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  • The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers
  • The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
  • Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
  • My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem
  • Landline by Rainbow Rowell
  • This Changes Everything by Naomi Klein
  • A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab
  • Buffering by Hannah Hart
  • Every Heart is a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
  • Cancer Ward by Aleksandr Solzenhitsyn
  • The Neapolitan Series by Elena Ferrante
  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  • Room on the Broom by Julia Donaldson
  • Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of The Cultural Revolution by Ji-li Jiang
  • Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe 
  • No Longer At Ease by Chinua Achebe

Least favorite books read in 2016:

  • Into the Dim by Janet B. Taylor
  • The Crown by Kiera Cass
  • The Pioneers by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult
  • Rusteloosheid by Ignaas Devisch
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned by Brian K. Vaughan
  • The Hush, Hush Series by Becca Fitzpatrick
  • A Shadow Bright and Burning by Jessica Cluess
  • Hot Milk by Deborah Levy
  • The Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Lindsey Lee Johnson
  • A Death in the Family by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Most anticipated releases of 2017:

  • A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab
  • Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor
  • Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han
  • If We Were Villains by @m-l-rio
  • The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy
  • A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas
  • Untitled (The Illuminae Files #3) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
  • The Bear and The Nightingale by Katherine Arden
  • 27 Hours by Tristina Wright
  • The Winds of Winter by George R. R. Martin (hahahahah)
  • Untitled (Throne of Glass #6) by Sarah J. Maas

*Bold indicates popular responses

Look at how many different books made people feel last year! Thank you to everyone who participated. @anassarhenisch, @maegan1116, @monsieurbookshire, @linebetween​, @lilathepirate, @leothil, @analyzemyfandom, @mockingjaynfinch​, @i-lay-reading, @marielreads​, @literatureandotherdemons, @lilyvandersteen​, @juan-nieves​, @schoolenthusiast, @trelaney, and @slugsgrossmeout!

If you’re interested in any of the books listed above or want to hear more, contact these lovely blogs (all of whom have feelings about some or all of the books listed above) and yell about books together! Community is what we’re all about! 

We would love to continue hearing from you guys throughout this year as well! Let us know what you’re gushing over!

Book recs for Gryffindors!

Gif source | More recs: gryffindor (pt. 2), hufflepuff (pt. 1 and pt. 2), ravenclaw (pt. 1 and pt. 2), slytherin (pt. 1and pt. 2) | text by @viegsen and @juan-nieves

House traits: brave, daring, chivalrous, strong willed, just, honorable, courteous, reckless, short tempered, disregard for rules

  • JUSTICE: WHAT’S THE RIGHT THING TO DO, by Michael J. Sandel - non fiction - Gryffindors care about justice, but knowing what’s the right thing to do isn’t always easy (as Hermione found out when her well intentioned plan to free the house elves didn’t exactly pan out). This book ponders on ethical dilemmas and the meaning of justice, and will help a Gryffindor navigate the grey areas of life.
  • THE HUNGER GAMES, by Suzanne Collins - YA; dystopia; romance - Well I don’t have to tell you about the plot of The Hunger Games, do I? IMO it’s pretty clear that Katniss is a Gryffindor, all that poaching and volunteering to go to a death arena in the place of her sister, and sticking it to the Capitol, then joining a revolution… girl couldn’t be more Gryffindor if she was carrying around Godric’s sword instead of a bow and arrow.
  • THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL, by Baroness Emma Orczy - historical fiction; adventure; romance - In the height of the French Revolution’s Terror, a mysterious English gentleman known only as the “Scarlet Pimpernel” recklessly risks his own life in order to rescue men, women and children condemned to die at the guillotine, and smuggles them out of France in daring escapes. Who is this brave fellow? Why, a Gryffindor, obviously.
  • THE ASSASSIN’S CURSE, by Cassandra Rose Clarke - YA; fantasy; romance - Ananna of the Tanarau is a pirate. When her parents try to marry her off to a guy from another pirate clan, she escapes, but the scorned clan sends an assassin after her. Problem: while fighting him, Ananna accidentally binds them together with a curse that can only be broken after three impossible tasks are completed. You guys, Ananna is such a Gryffindor - I mean, strong willed? check. Daring? check. Short tempered? Disregard for rules? check AND check. She’s awesome, and reading about her adventures with Naji, the moody assassin is a delight. Girl power! Lesbian princesses! Hilarious manticores! Shitty wizards! This book’s got it all.
  • LORD OF THE RINGS, by J.R.R. Tolkien - fantasy - LotR is really all about adventure, courage, friendship,  honor, daring, fighting against evil and all that, and there are so many Gryffindors in this story. Isn’t everyone from the Fellowship a Gryffindor?
  • JANE EYRE, by Charlotte Brontë - romance - Jane Eyre is a boss. Everyone likes to talk about Mr. Rochester, but what most struck me when reading this was that Jane had nerves of steel, and that is a huge Gryffindor trait. She stands up against bullies all her life, she has an inate sense of justice, and doesn’t take any shit from Mr Rochester, and when she leaves his house without a penny in her pocket it’s like, damn, this girl is brave as hale.
  • PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, by Jane Austen - romance - Isn’t Elizabeth a total Gryffindor? She takes no one’s shit and has a brave streak that shows when she stays true to herself, standing up to everyone that tells her she’s wrong in doing so. She has pride, a very strong sense of right and wrong, and can’t stand the thought of someone being mistreated for having some sort of disadvantage. She also jumps to conclusions and assumes a lot, which tends to bite her in the ass in more than one ocasion (again, Hermione much?).
  • NORTH & SOUTH, by Elizabeth Gaskell - romance - North & South is kind of like Pride & Prejudice in the Industrial Revolution. Basically imagine Mr. Darcy as an industrialist and Margaret as a gently-bred country girl who moves to a manufacturing town and is appalled by the working conditions, general poverty, etc, so she takes up the fight against social injustice, which invariably puts her at odds with Mr. Thornton. Now, he might be a (delicious) Slytherin but damn if Margaret isn’t a Gryffindor: strong willed and just and brave (and also a little reckless tbh). (Also I’ll have you Gryffindors know that you got my top 3 favourite romances, JE, P&P, and N&S).
  • HIS DARK MATERIALS, by Philip Pullman - fantasy; YA - This epic fantasy trilogy has everything a Gryffindor would love to read about: a story set in an unknown and fantastical place, brave and adventurous characters, creatures that are kinda like a permanent patronus (but more awesome than that tbh), and really creepy villains. I’m not gonna spoil you on these books because it’s really great going into them not knowing much, but I’ll just say you should pick up your lion daemon and follow Lyra while she carries on her quest to save her friend and then oh so much more.
  • THE DIVINERS, by Libba Bray - YA; fantasy - A lot about this novel feels very reminiscent of Harry Potter as character: you get a girl that wants to get out of a place filled with not very nice memories, a special power that puts her in quite a dangerous situation, and a brave nature that leads her to get involved in spite of her fear. Set in the 1920s and with a plot that centers around mysterious murders, this book features an obscure villain Gryffindors would both like to read about and take down themselves.
  • THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING, by T.H. White - fantasy - This is kind of an off-beat retelling of the Arthurian legends, and what could possibly be more Gryffindor than King Arthur and his brave knights and all that stuff about chivalry and quests, etc? I’m just gonna leave you guys with a quote from the book, which sounds just like something Dumbledore would say: “The bravest people are the ones who don’t mind looking like cowards”.
  • THE THREE MUSKETEERS, by Alexandre Dumas - historical fiction - I thought of Gryffindor for this book because reading it is the equivalent of Harry checking out Snape’s memories and finding out the Marauders were kiiiind of a bunch of dicks. Because turns out, so were the Musketeers! Sometimes the combination of certain Gryffindor traits like short temper, recklessness and disregard for rules (and a little arrogance, lbr) ends up being quite unsavoury.
Pompeii: ni las calugas de Juan Nieve la salvan

Review por Pamela Silva G

No es que una espere una trama fabulosa cuando ve una película como Pompeii, que desde el trailer se ve que no será la película que transformará tu vida ni que se va a ganar todos los premios de la existencia. Pero tampoco pensé que sería tan mala, que ya se ganó un puesto asegurado en la categoría Peor Película del año en los Quinn’s Landing Awards 2014.

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