juan nieve

Book recs for Hufflepuffs!

Gif source | More recs: hufflepuff (pt. 2), ravenclaw (pt. 1 and pt. 2), slytherin (pt. 1 and pt. 2), gryffindor (pt. 1 and pt. 2) | text by @viegsen and @juan-nieves

House traits: trustworthy, loyal, kind, just, friendly, patient, hardworking, dedicated, inclusive

  • FEMINISM IS FOR EVERYBODY, by bell hooks - non fiction - Hufflepuffs care about justice, equality and inclusion, and they aren’t afraid to fight for what’s right. Helga Hufflepuff never stood for discrimination of any kind and for this reason I would recommend this amazing and inspiring work by bell hooks, which presents a passionate theory of feminism sure to appeal to the socially-conscious Hufflepuff!
  • THE PRINCESS BRIDE, by William Goldman - fantasy - Adventures aren’t just for Gryffindors! And in any case, The Princess Bride is about lots of things, not least of all perseverance, endurance and working hard for revenge (like Inigo) and for true love (like Westley). A funny and hearwarming story that could be read aloud in the cosy Hufflepuff common room for everybody to enjoy.
  • A LITTLE PRINCESS, by Frances Hodgson Burnett - children’s - “I am a princess. All girls are. Even if they live in tiny old attics. Even if they dress in rags, even if they aren’t pretty, or smart, or young. They’re still princesses.” I dare you not to cry when reading the story of Sara Crewe, a kind-hearted girl who goes from the most pampered student in an all-girls school to the lowliest servant when her father dies, and stays just as loving, friendly, generous and patient, because even all the terrible things she suffers cannot change the fact that she’s a princess in her heart.
  • FANGIRL, by Rainbow Rowell - YA; romance - Cath is a Hufflepuff with crippling social anxiety. When she goes to college, she has to juggle the challenges of her new life, a bad home situation, a new distance from her twin sister, and a crush on her intimidating roomate’s cute boyfriend, Levi (also a total Hufflepuff). It can be quite sugary-sweet at times, but I think Hufflepuffs will appreciate the characters a lot.
  • PERSUASION, by Jane Austen - romance - Anne Elliot is unfailingly dedicated to her family. When she’s 19, she’s reluctantly persuaded that her engagement with naval officer Frederick Wentworth is beneath her family’s status, and gives up on her love. She spends years being treated terribly by her family but enduring it with the patience of Job. When Frederick reappears in her life, he’s rich and respectable, and looking for a wife, while Anne (at 27) is quite “on the shelf” by Regency standards, but strong, quietly dignified and much more mature than the girl she was. Could Frederick ever forgive her? Could Anne hope for a chance of happiness?
  • COTILLION, by Georgette Heyer - historical romance - Did you know that Georgette Heyer is the inventor of the Toaster Strudel Regency historical romance? Cotillion is absolutely hilarious (it’s actually more of a comedy than a romance, really) and follows Kitty and Freddy, who get up to all sorts of hijinks in London after getting fake-engaged. They are consistently underestimated by the people around them but are, of course, as trustworthy, kind, friendly and dependable as you’d expect from two Hufflepuff cuties!
  • SCANDAL IN SPRING, by Lisa Kleypas - historical romance - Daisy Bowman is a nice, romantic, kind girl who is told by her father that if she can’t find a husband by the end of Spring, she would have to marry the bridegroom of his choice, Matthew Swift, whom Daisy hasn’t seen in years, but considers to be cold, aloof and ruthless. As they reacquaint themselves, however, the idea of marrying Swift starts looking decidedly attractive…
  • RADIANCE, by Grace Draven - fantasy romance - Ildiko and Brishen are nobles who enter into an arranged marriage to seal an alliance between their kingdoms. Just a teeny, tiny, problem: Brishen and his people aren’t actually human. This is a cool twist on the Beauty and the Beast story because both parties think the other is a Beast. But Ildiko and Brishen are both decent people who try to make the best out of a difficult situation and end up forming a deep friendship. If being a Hufflepuff is all about accepting those who are different and not being judgmental, these two are definitely Hufflepuffs.
  • THE BOOK THIEF, by Markus Zusak - historical fiction - Liesel Meminger is a girl who comes into the care of Hans and Rosa Hubermann feeling like there’s not much in the world that isn’t scary or dangerous. However, through the patience, humor, warmth and kindness she finds in her new surroundings -even during WWII in Germany-, she slowly begins to see everything in a different light. This book is filled with tons of Hufflepuff characters that not only see the value of being accepting and compassionate, but of actually following those feelings with actions that benefit those that might need it most.
  • THE COLOR PURPLE, by Alice Walker - historical fiction - Set in rural Georgia in the 1930s, this epistolary novel tells the story of Celie, a black woman that has to live a life filled with as many hardships and heartbreaks as you could imagine. Don’t let that depressing summary convince you of not picking up this book though, because what makes it great is that it’s actually a story very much about the triumph of the human spirit. Celie sees the world in a really moving way, and it helps to show you just how big of an impact empathy and acceptance can make in someone’s life.
  • MAUS, by Art Spiegelman - graphic novel - This graphic novel set tells you the true story of Art Spiegelman’s father, who was a survivor of the Holocaust. Here you’ll find a man that, in true Hufflepuff fashion, works carefully and relentlessly to make the best he possibly can out of a horrible situation for himself and his family. As with most of literature set in or about this time period, you get to see how it in some ways shaped the man he was later in life, but that doesn’t prevent you from seeing just how intelligent and perseverant he always was.
  • THE HISTORY OF LOVE, by Nicole Krauss - fiction - I honestly think this book is better if you go into it not knowing much about it, but I’ll tell you this: it has 3 stories that are linked in one way or another, it’s a book about human relationships and the endurance of love, and it will probably make you very very sad and very happy at the same time.
  • UPROOTED, by Naomi Novik - fantasy; romance - This book may have been marketed as more of a romance but the most important relationship in it is the friendship between Agniezka and Kasia. You could argue Agniezka is actually a Gryffindor on account of the many brave deeds she performs to save her friend and her village but I just think she has a very laid-back, Hufflepuff vibe, and more than bravery it is her loyalty and empathy that define her.
  • DAUGHTER OF THE FOREST, by Juliet Marillier - fantasy - [tw: rape!!!] Sorcha, the protagonist, is very much a Hufflepuff. She is fiercely loyal to her six brothers and her people, and kind even to her enemies. She is really into plants and healing (herbology, anyone?) and always rushes to help those in need no matter their social station or if it will get her in trouble. And when her brothers are cursed she really goes above and beyond to save them, in an impressive display of patience and hard work.
Book recs for Slytherins!

Gif source | More recs: slytherin (pt. 2),  hufflepuff (pt. 1 and pt. 2), ravenclaw (pt. 1 and pt. 2), gryffindor (pt. 1 and pt. 2) | text by @viegsen and @juan-nieves

House traits: ambitious, cunning, resourceful, shrewd, achievement-oriented, planner, strong leader, sense of self-preservation, disregard for rules, self-interested, exclusive (but with strong ties within exclusive groups)

  • THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, by Oscar Wilde - horror - Slytherins care a lot about power, we know that much. Power comes from different sources and in different forms though, and in this classic you’ll find a man that goes above and beyond to gain the particular kind of power that comes with youth and beauty, and he will do anything to maintain it. On top of all that, this book has a really weird/great mix of decadence and elegance that gives it a very unique feel that I think a Slytherin would quite appreciate.
  • SNOBS, by Julian Fellowes - fiction - Set in England in the 1990s, Snobs is a kind of fictional tell-all on Edith Lavery, a social climbing young woman who is determined to marry well, and ends up nabbing a kind but extremely dull Earl. Edith is perfectly aware that she is marrying a man who bores her to death for his money and position, and the reader follows this unapologetically cunning and ambitious woman as she navigates the ups and downs of life in the British upper class.
  • THE PRINCE, by Machiavelli - non fiction - In what is possibly the most Slytherin work ever, Machiavelli breaks with the Catholic doctrine of his time to counsel princes that the actions of State leaders need not be guided by the morality of the common man. The ends of the Prince (survival, honor, glory) justify the means used to achieve them. This has greatly influenced the Realist theory of International Reations, and Niccòlo’s advice is still interesting even for the non-politically inclined Slytherin: for example, the advice that a Prince should not leave his fate to chance, but rather make his own fortune, through hard work, prudence, virtue (not the Catholic kind), risk-taking and the ability to adapt to different circumstances.
  • PERFUME, by Patrick Süskind - historical fiction; horror - Ok, so you might think this book only highlights the more stereotypical side of the Slytherin house, but hear me out: here you have a story that portrays ambition, dedication, power, and clearly set goals in a way that you don’t really find in a lot of books. You get the chance to read about a man who is capable of doing anything in order to fulfill his goal, and who learns how to deal with people in a way that benefits him. What is also great about this book is that you get to read about a kind of power that is not really related to money, but to something that you might not even associate with the idea of power: smells. This books is also written beautifully, in such a way that you don’t even understand how descriptions of filth and shit can sound so poetic.
  • DEVIL IN WINTER, by Lisa Kleypas - historical romance - Cunning, resourceful and quite amoral, the “hero” of this novel is your quintessential Slytherin. He made some (less than favourable) appearances in other novels in this series (which you don’t have to read in order), and in Devil in Winter, he enters into a marriage of convenience with a woman he barely knows (who’s escaping abusive relatives) because she’s a heiress. Now isn’t it adorable when a Slytherin falls in love and puts all that ruthlessness and shrewdness in service of their loved one?
  • THE HEIRESS EFFECT, by Courtney Milan - historical romance - There is no question that the hero in this historical romance is a huge Slytherin. A son of a farmer who is making his way to the top, he is really, really, REALLY ambitious, a natural leader, and not above doing extremely morally dubious things to achieve his ends, either. Would he give up all his plans for the love of a woman who is wrong for him in every way?
  • MASTER OF CROWS, by Grace Draven - fantasy romance - Master of Crows is about Silhara, a renegade wizard who is tempted into selling his soul for the promise of limitless power, and Martise, a slave who volunteers to spy on him and betray him in order to win her own freedom. As they fall in love, their needs and ambitions pull them in different directions.
  • DIPLOMACY, by Henry Kissinger - non fiction - If you’re a Slytherin who’s into history or politics, this is fascinating stuff. Kissinger writes about some of History’s greatest leaders and diplomats, like Richelieu, Metternich and Bismarck, and discusses at length the power plays in international politics.
  • THE GREAT GATSBY, by F. Scott Fitzgerald - fiction - I mean… do I even have to say anything? If they read Muggle books, this one (a super rare first edition or something like that, probably) would totally be in the Malfoys’ personal library.
  • THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, by Isabel Allende - magical realism - A family saga where class and ambition are very clearly depicted. Two things make it even better and add a bit of diversity to the Slytherin house: it’s focuses on three generations of women, and it’s set in a Latin American country.
  • WUTHERING HEIGHTS, by Emily Brontë - romance - Ah, if this isn’t a great source of Slytherin angst! Besides Catherine and Heathcliff’s dramatic love story that most of you probably know pretty well, here it’s precisely in Heathcliff that you get to see just how effectively Slytherins can use their drive and resourcefulness to get where they want in life.
  • FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD, by Thomas Hardy - romance - Bathsheba Everdene, a young and independent woman, comes into an inheritance that leads her to Weatherbury, where she has to deal with tons of shitty people and difficult situations in order to make a name for herself in a time and place where women are at a clear disadvantage. You’ll find in Bathsheba a clever Slytherin woman that knows exactly her worth; who uses her ambition, intelligence and resourcefulness to be the master of her own life and destiny, and to build a place for her within a society that continually tries to dominate her.
  • CRAZY RICH ASIANS, by Kevin Kwan - contemporary - There are lots of threads to this book. You have super rich, ultra-elitist people who will do anything to stop the “undesirables” from marrying into their Noble and Most Ancient family. You have ambitious, cunning people who would trample all over everyone, including their children, to achieve their ends. You also have privileged but kind people trying to balance their wants with what is expected of them by their family and their social circle. Lots of Slytherins in this highly entertaining story. The sequel China Rich Girlfriend is already out, btw.
Pompeii: ni las calugas de Juan Nieve la salvan

Review por Pamela Silva G

No es que una espere una trama fabulosa cuando ve una película como Pompeii, que desde el trailer se ve que no será la película que transformará tu vida ni que se va a ganar todos los premios de la existencia. Pero tampoco pensé que sería tan mala, que ya se ganó un puesto asegurado en la categoría Peor Película del año en los Quinn’s Landing Awards 2014.

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