jrr-tolkien

  • <p> <b>Tolkien:</b> By the end of the Third Age, Sauron's physical power is so diminished that his presence is confined to the tower of Barad-Dur. However, he is still immensely powerful in his ability to watch and predict the movements of his enemies, and his understanding extends so far that he could metaphorically be referred to as a Great Eye, constantly watching and planning his next move. And because his gaze is so piercing, it is sometimes likened to fire.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Okay but...hear me out...what if Sauron was literally....a Great Eye.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> What.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> What if he was literally a giant eyeball on the top of Barad-Dur.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> That's not quite what I inten-<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Made of FIRE. A LITERAL GIANT FIERY EYEBALL.<p/></p>
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JRR Tolkien, master of modern fantasy, held a deep, undying dislike for the Bard of England. Let’s talk about why and how it impacted his writing.


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