joris karl huysman

medicine-student-blog  asked:

Hi! I am wondering if you have heard of the author Joris-Karl Huysmans? He's a French novelist; I love his writing. The reason I ask if you have heard of him, is that I am struggling to find any book that offers the same language use and depth. If you, or your followers have any knowledge of similar authors, I'm welcome to try their works!

Sorry, I haven’t heard of Joris-Karl Huysmans. I’m hoping some of my followers can help you out. 

I learned long ago that there are no people interesting to know except saints, scoundrels, and cranks. They are the only persons whose conversation amounts to anything. Persons of good sense are necessarily dull, because they revolve over and over again the tedious topics of everyday life. They are the crowd, more or less intelligent, but they are the crowd, and they give me a pain.
—  Là-bas by J. K. Huysmans
Libros para los signos.

Aries.

• Bajo las ruedas. —Hermann Hesse.

 • La quinta ola. —Rick Yancey

 Tauro. 

• La tregua. —Mario Benedetti. 

• Game of Thrones. —George R. R. Martin. 

 Géminis. 

• A contrapelo —Joris-Karl Huysmans.


• Percy Jackson. —Rick Riordan. 

Cáncer.

• Harry Potter. —J.K Rowling.

• Los Misérables. —Víctor Hugo.

Leo.

• Macbeth. —William Shakespeare.

• La selección. —Kiera Cass.

Virgo.

• La divina comedia. —Dante Alighieri.

• Nunca me abandones. —Kazuo Ishiguro.

Libra.

.• La rebelión de la granja. —George Orwell.

• La chica del tren. —Paula Hawkins. 

Escorpio.

• El retrato de Dorian Gray. —Oscar Wilde.

• The maze runner. —James Dashner. 

Sagitario.

• El señor de los anillos. —J.R. R.Tolkein.

• Buscando a Alaska. —John Green. 

Capricornio.

• Crimen y castigo. —Fíodor Dostoievski.

• Cazadores de sombras. —Cassandra Clare.

Acuario.

• El viejo y el mar. —Ernest Hemingway.

• The Raven Boys. —Maggie Stiefvater

Piscis.

• David Copperfield. —Charles Dickens.

• El hogar de Miss Peregrines para niños peculiares. —Ransom Riggs

Espero que les guste 💘 Elegí un libro clásico y otro moderno, para que satisfacer distintos gustos.

La~Bas by J K Huysmans

Possibly the finest novel ever written for its insights in the search for the dark nature of humanity and the Unholy Rites of Satanism and Devil Worship, unfortunately Huysmans novels are always tinged with that side of himself which was of Catholic orientation ~ still he had an aspect which craved knowledge of the Dark Side and was dissatisfied with the mundane in life.

Some people say it is too littered with intellectual conversations of no importance, I disagree, La~Bas is written to probe the mind!

anonymous asked:

Top 10 books recs, please?

oh, sure! sorry if this is long and boring, but i had to explain why i recommend these books and make a tiny description of what i think about them, in case you’re interested to read one and have no idea what you have to expect for it.

  • crime and punishment, fyodor dostoyevsky; along goethe’s faust, i think this is my favourite book. even though there are almost 600 pages of heavy dostoyevskian description, complex monologues and even more complex events, i literally devoured it in two days and absolutely love it. if you want a complex read but also a fascinating story with beautiful characters, you must read it. 
  • agony and ecstasy, irving stone; this book changed my life. this novel, which is about michelangelo’s life, emanates such art, with its richness of information and smooth, beautifully-written prose. you’ll immediately wish to know more about art and you’ll become conscious of what a divine thing it is.
  • the blind assassin, margaret atwood; i don’t like contemporary books, but this novel is definitely an exception. her writing style is marvellous, raw, and even though the story seems kind of banal, this book is an experience. an easy, but complex and surprising read. totally recommend. 
  • les fleurs du mal, charles baudelaire; baudelaire is my favourite poet for who i carry in my heart an eternal and intense love. you absolutely need to read his poems! they’re so gloomy, palpable, cold. and i love him. 
  • against nature, joris-karl huysmans; this is the most pretentious book i’ve ever read, but also one of my favourite. however, it’s a book hard to love. the number of the characters is insignificant and the action is almost nonexistent. the book consists mostly on descriptions and monologues. but they’re more than beautifully-written and, oh, i can’t put it into words. life-changing. it’s a small and strange read, but its complexity is fascinating. and huysmans is such an underrated author, he’s incredible.
  • hamlet, william shakespeare
  • king lear, william shakespeare; in case you wondered what are my favourite books by him. they have, especially hamlet, a deeply important place in my heart. 
  • the portrait of dorian gray, oscar wilde; i find this book an essential read only because it utterly changed my view in literature. it was my first classic. you just can’t not love this novel.
  • the aleph and other stories, jorge luis borges; he’s m a g i c a l. his writing style is extremely poetic and wondrous and his ideas are sublime.
  • faust, johann wolfgang von goethe; my absolute favourite book. my heart beats for it. every moment i live, i live with this play in my mind. my love for this piece of paradise is hard to put into words. everything about this was beathtaking and goethe is such a genius. someday, you need to read this book.
  • orlando, virginia woolf; her works are delicate, vernal, fragile. they give me an inscrutable and unique feeling. and this book is my favourite.
He had to live on himself, to feed on his own substance, like those animals that lie torpid in a hole all winter. Solitude had acted on his brain like a narcotic, first exciting and stimulating him, then inducing a languor haunted by vague reveries, vitiating his plans, nullifying his intentions, leading a whole cavalcade of dreams to which he passively submitted, without even trying to get away.
—  Excerpt from Against Nature by Joris-Karl Huysmans
List of shibboleth names

by which the privileged judge their inferiors

A

Abbe Suger (French pronunciation: syoo-zheh, British: soo-gehr)

Chinua Achebe (chin-oo-ah ah-chay-bae)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (chim-ah-man-da nnnn-go-zeh ah-dee-che)

James Agee (a-jee)

Anna Akhmatova (onna ock-mah-taugh-vah)

Louis Althusser (lou-wee al-too-sair)

Jerzy Andrzejewski (yer-zhay ahn-zhay-ev-ski)

Roger Angell (angel)

Jean Anouilh (~ahn’oo-ee)

Diane Arbus (dee-ann)

Hannah Arendt (hahn-ah ahr-ent)

Martha Argerich (mar-tah herr-each)

Eugène Atget (oo-zhenne at-zhey)

Augustine of Hippo (aw-gus-tin)

Autechre (aw-tekk-er)

Richard Ayoade (eye-oh-wah-dee)

B

Angelo Badalamenti (bottle-ah-menti)

Walter Bagehot (badget)

Balliol College (bay-lee-uhl)

Donald/Frederick Barthelme (barth-uhl-me)

Karl Barth (bart)

Roland Barthes (bart)

Tom Beauchamp (beachum)

Walter Benjamin (ben-yameen)

John Berger (berdger)

Bishop Berkeley (barkley)

Hans Bethe (beta)

John Betjeman (betch-uh-mun)

Joseph Beuys (boyz)

Hieronymus Bosch (Flemish pronunciation: heer-rone-nee-mohse boss)

Tadeusz Borowski (tah-de-yoosh borr-off-ski)

Anthony Boucher (rhymes with voucher)

Tycho Brahe (Danish pronunciation: too-ghoh brahhh)

Broad Art Museum (brode)

Hermann Broch (~hair-monn brohhh)

Burgundy Street, New Orleans (burr-gun-dee)

Steve Buscemi (boo-semm-ee)

Bowdoin College (boh-din)

C

Gonville and Caius College (keys)

Menzies Campbell (ming-iss)

Thomas Carew (carey)

Vija Celmins (vee-yah tell-midge)

Michael Chabon (shay-bonn)

Jan Czochralski (yann choh-h’ral-ski)

J.C. Chandor (shann-door)

Dan Chaon (shawn)

Chyron (kai-rawn or kai-run)

Cimabue (chee-ma-boo-ee)

Karel Čapek (kah-rell chap-eck)

Michael Cimino (chee-me-noh)

Emil Cioran (chore-ahn)

Ta-Nehisi Coates (tah-nuh-hah-see)

Alexander/Andrew/Patrick Cockburn (coburn)

Paulo Coelho (~pow-lu kuh-whey.l-you.)1

J.M. Coetzee (koot-see)

Robert Campin (com-pin)

William Cowper (cooper)

Cré na Cille, Máirtín Ó Cadhain book (~kreh neh kill-eh)

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (me-high cheek-sent-me-high)

Countee Cullen (cown-tay)

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (skwoh-doaf-ska)

Alfonso/Jonás/Carlo Cuarón (al-fone-so/ho-nas kwah-roan)

D

Gerard David (Flemish pronunciation: ~hhheer-ahrd dahh-fidd)

The Dalles, Oregon (the dolls)

Guy Debord (ghee du-borrh)

Louis De Broglie (duh broy)

Giorgio De Chirico (Italian pronunciation: ~dee kee-ree-koh)

Richard Dedekind (between day-dah-kin and day-dah-kint)

Wilhelm Dilthey (dill-tai)

Alfred Döblin (deu-bleen)

Don Juan, Byron character (jew-un)

Gerrit/Gerard Dou (dow)

W.E.B. DuBois (duh-boyz)

Andre Dubus (duh-byoose)

E

Chiwetel Ejiofor (choo-we-tell edge-ee-oh-for)

Cary Elwes (ell-wiss)

Paul Erdős (~pal ehr-deush)

John Scotus Eriugena (era-jee-nah)

Leonhard Euler (oiler)

F

Nuruddin Farah (Somali pronunciation: ~nour-oo-deen farr-ah)

Colm Feore (column fury)

Ferdydurke (fair-deh-dure-kuh)

Paul Feyerabend (fire-ah-bent)

Johann Gottlieb Fichte (feesh-tuh)3

Ralph/Ranulph/Sophie/Joseph/Magnus/Martha Fiennes (rayf finezzzzzzzzzzzzz)

Gustave Flaubert (flow-bear)

William Foege (fay-ghee)

Lee Fang (fong)

Michel Foucault (~foo-coh)

Gottlob Frege (got-lobe free-geh)

James Frey (fry)

G

Gallaudet University (gal-uh-debt)

Clifford Geertz (gurtz)

Alberto Giacometti (Swiss pronunciation: yah-coh-mett-ee)2

André Gide (zheed)

Giotto (jhott-oh)

H.R. Giger (ghee-guh)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (~ger-tuh)

Nikolai Gogol (goggle)

Witold Gombrowicz (vee-told gomm-broh-vitch)

Jan Gossaert (~yann ho-sight) aka ‘Mabuse’ (mah-buu-zuh)

Philip Gourevitch (guh-ray-vitch)

Antonio Gramsci (gromm-she)

Matt Groening (graining)

Alexander Grothendieck (groat-enn-deek)

David Guetta (gay-tah)

H

Vaclav Havel (vott-slav hah-vell)

Michael Haneke (hanukkah)

Margaret H’Doubler (dough-blur)

Seamus Heaney (shay-muss hee-knee)

Aleksandar Hemon (between heh-monn and heh-mown)

Zbigniew Herbert (z’beeg-nyeff herr-behrt)

John Hersey (hearse-ey)

Hesiod (he-see-uhd)

Hermann Hesse (~hair-monn heh-seh)

Guy Hocquenghem (ghee ock-en-g’yem)

homo sacer, Agamben concept (Italian pronunciation: oh-moh satch-air)

Houston Street, Manhattan (house-ton)

Joris-Karl Huysmans (zhour-ris karl weese-moss)4

Bohumil Hrabal (boh-who-meal h’rah-ball)

Alfred Hrdlička (German pronunciation: ~hairt-litch-kah)

I

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (angh)

Eugène Ionesco (Romanian pronunciation: ~yoh-ness-koh)

Luce Irigaray (loose ear-ee-garr-eh)

J

Roman Jakobson (jacob-son)

Jacques, Shakespeare character (jay-kwiss)

Erica Jong (zhong)

Seu Jorge (~sewe zhawzhe)1

Carl Jung (yoong)

K

Frigyes Karinthy (free-gesh car-inn-tee)

Keble College (keeble)

Kelis Rogers (kuh-leece)

Imre Kertész (imm-reh kare-tace)

John Maynard Keynes (kanes)

Omar Khayyam (high-yahm)

Krzysztof Kieślowski (krish-toff keesh-loff-skee)

Q'orianka/Xihuaru Kilcher (core-i-an-ka/see-wahr-oo)

Danilo Kiš (dann-eel-oh keesh)

Paul Klee (powell clay)

Stephen Cole Kleene (cleany)

Phil Klay (kligh)

Karl Ove Knausgård (Norwegian pronunciation: ~kahl oo-veh kuh-nauss-gahd)

Zoltán Kodály (zohwl-tahn koh-die)

Sarah Koenig (kay-nig)

Alexandre Kojève (koh-zhevv)

Tadeusz Konwicki (tah-de-yoosh konn-vitz-ski)

Jerzy Kosiński (yer-zhay koh-shin-ski)

Alexandre Koyré (kwah-ray)

Saul Kripke (crip-key)

Thomas Kuhn (coon)

Milan Kundera (Czech pronunciation: mill-ahn koon-der-uh)

L

Henri Lefebvre (luh-fevv-ruh)

Stanisław Lem (stan-ni-swaf lemm)

Jonathan Lethem (leeth-um)

Jared Leto (let -oh)

Primo Levi (leh-vee)

Marina Lewycka (leh-vitz-kah)

Mario Vargas Llosa (yoh-sah)

Peter Lorre (laura)

Jan Łukasiewicz (yann wu-kah-shey-vitch)

M

Magdalen College, Oxford/Cambridge (mawd-lin)

Mannes College of Music (mannis)

Quentin Matsys/Quinten Matsijs (Flemish pronunciation: kvinn-tin mott-sayse)

Somerset Maugham (mawm)

Kazimir Malevich (may-lay-vich)

Thomas Mann (toe-mahs mahn)

Don Marquis (mar-kwiss)

Olivier Messiaen (oh-leev-yay meh-syonh)

Joel Meyerowitz (my-yer-uh-wits)

Czesław Miłosz (chess-waff me-woahsh)

Joan Miró (zhwamn me-roh)

László Moholy-Nagy (~lass-low moh-holy noidge-eh)

Robert Moog (mogue)

George Mosse (mossy)

Sławomir Mrożek (swah-voh-meer m’roh-zhek)

Ron Mueck (myoo-ick)

Harry Mulisch (mool-ish)

Edvard Munch (ed-vart moonk)

Robert Musil (moo-zeal/moo-seal)

Eadweard Muybridge (edward my-bridge)

N

Nacogdoches, Texas (nack-uh-dough-chis)

Natchitoches, Louisiana (nack-uh-tush)

Otto Neurath (noi-raht)

Bill Nighy (nye)

Anaïs Nin (ah-nayh-ees ninn)

Emmy Noether (neur-tuh)

Cees Nooteboom (sayze note-uh-bome)

Lupita Nyong'o (~nnnnn yong-oh)

O

Obergefell v. Hodges (oh-burr-geh-fell)

Máirtín Ó Cadhain (marr-teen oh kai-un)

Adepero Oduye (add-uh-pair-oh oh-doo-yay)

Jenny Offill (oh-full)

Claes Oldenburg (kloss)

Michael Ondaatje (awn-datch-ee)

The River Ouse (ooze)

David Oyelowo (oh-yell-uh-whoah)

P

Chuck Palahniuk (paul-uh-nik)

Wolfgang Pauli (pow-lee)

Charles Sanders Peirce (purse)

Samuel Pepys (peeps)

Jodi Picoult (pee-coe)

Max Planck (plonk)

Plotinus (ploh-tine-us)

Anthony Powell (po-uhl)

John Cowper Powys (cooper poh-iss)

Principia Mathematica (prin-kipp-ee-yah)

Annie Proulx (proo)

Marcel Proust (proost)

Joseph Pulitzer (puh-litz-ur)

Q

Qatar (cutter/gutter)5

Quinnipiac University (kwinn-uh-pea-ack)

R

Ayn Rand (well-fare recipient)

Sławomir Rawicz (swah-voh-meer rahh-vitch)

Satyajit Ray (Bengali pronunciation: ~shut-uh-jeet rye)

Steve Reich (raish)

Tom Regan (ray-gun)

ricercar (Italian pronunciation: ~reach-ur-car)

Rainer Maria Rilke (rhine-er mahr-ee-a reel-kuh)

Nicolas Roeg (rogue)

Theodore Roethke (ret-key)

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen/Roentgen (vill-helm rhont-gn)

Klaus Roth (roath)

Mary Ruefle (roo-full)

Ed Ruscha (roo-shay)

S

Edward Said (sigh-eed)

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (sanh-eks-oo-pear-ee)

Luc Sante (sahnt)

Leonardo Sciascia (shah-shah)

Schlumberger (slumber-zhay)

Bruno Schulz (schooltz)

Martin Scorsese (score-sess-ee)

Henry Scrope, Shakespeare character (scroop)

W.G. Sebald (zay-bald)

Chloë Sevigny (sevv-un-ee)

Choire Sicha (corey seeka)

Charles Simić (Serbian pronunciation: simm-itch, but often called simmick)

Victor Sjöström (Swedish pronunciation: veek-torr hhhwhere-strome)

Theda Skocpol (scotch-pole)

Josef Škvorecký (yoh-zeff shkvore-etz-ski)

William Smellie (smiley)

Todd Solondz (suh-lawnz)

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (saul-zhuh-neat-sin)

Léon Spilliaert (Dutch pronunciation: lay-on spilly-art)

Strange, barony (strang)

Edward Steichen (shtike-inn)

William Stukeley (stoo-key)

Wisława Szymborska (vee-swa-va shim-bor-ska)

T

Gay Talese (tuh-leeze)

Chief Justice Roger Taney (tawny)

Nahum Tate (neigh-m)

Tchoupitoulas Street, New Orleans (chop-uh-too-luss)

Wayne Thiebaud (tee-bo)

Uwe Timm (ooh-veh)

Tzvetan Todorov (tsveh-tahn toh-duh-roff)

Colm Tóibín (~column toh-been)

Ernst Troeltsch (trolch)

Edward Tufte (tuff-tee)

Tulane University (too-lane)

Ivan Turgenev (yvonne turr-gain-yevv)

George W. S. Trow (like ’grow’)

V

Michel Houllebecq (he doesn’t care)

Joos van Cleve (yohss fon clay-vuh)

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (meez fonn der roh-uh)

Rogier van der Weyden (~ro-kheer fon dur vay-dun)

Arnoldus Vanderhorst, ultimate namesake of Luther (vandross)

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch pronunciation: ~finch-ant fan hawh)

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (ahn-toe-nee fon lay-when-hook)

Rembrandt van Rijn (remm-brondt fon rain)

Ludvík Vaculík (lood-veek vatz-oo-leek)

Johannes Vermeer (yo-hann-iss furr-meer)

Jones Very (jonas veery)

Vladimir Voinovich (vlah-dee-meer voy-noh-vitch)

Ludwig von Mises (fonn meez-ess)

Georg Henrik von Wright (fon vrikt)

W

Ayelet Waldman (eye-yell-it)

Quvenzhané Wallis (kwuh-ven-zhuh-nay)

Robert Walser (valzer)

Jean-Antoine Watteau (French pronunciation: ~vah-teau)

Evelyn St. John Waugh (eve-linn sin-jun wahh)

Max Weber (veigh-burr)

Simone Weil (zee-moan veigh)

Elie Wiesel (eel-ee vee-zell)

Garry Winogrand (win-uh-grand)

Ludwig Wittgenstein (vitt-genn-shtein)

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (wood-house)

David Wojnarowicz (voy-nah-roh-vitch)

Hermann Wouk (woke)

Woyzeck, Büchner play (voight-zikk)

Joseph Wright of Derby (right of dahr-bee)

Y

William Butler Yeats (yates)

Yerkes Observatory (yer-keys)

Yoknapatawpha County, Faulkner setting (yolk-nuh-pah-taw-fa)

Z

Robert Zajonc (zai-unts)

Slavoj Žižek (slah-voi zhee-zhek)

Andrzej Żuławski (ahn-drey zhu-wavv-ski)

1 Portuguese has a much more complicated phonetics than English & so these are especially approximate.

2 Because Giacometti was from the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland a kind of second order snobbishness has descended on the pronunciation of his name. Most people who would judge you pronounce it as you would in Italian (jah-coh-mett-ee) but an inner-inner circle insist on correcting even these people with the Swiss-Italian pronunciation listed here.

3 The pronunciation of the -ch as soft instead of hard, unlike every other instance in German, was contrived after the philosopher’s death to avoid a near-homophony with that language’s word for ‘fuck.’

4 The last syllable doesn’t have an English equivalent but rhymes with the French pronunciation of Jean’s.

5 The first letter (qaf/qof/ق) has no equivalent in English or any other Western language and is more glottal than either of the sounds starting these approximations.

More? Better phonetic versions?

The Middle Ages… knew that everything on earth is a sign, a figure, that the visible is only worth what it extracts from the invisible; the Middle Ages… which were not gullible, as we are, to appearances, closely studied this science and made it the caretaker and the servant of mysticism.
—  Joris-Karl Huysmans, excerpted from “The Cathedral”
Indeed, each several liquor corresponded, so he held, in taste with the sound of a particular instrument. Dry curacao, for instance, was like the clarinet with its shrill, velvety note; kummel like the oboe, whose timbre is sonorous and nasal; crême de menthe and anisette like the flute, at one and the same time sweet and poignant, whining and soft. Then, to complete the orchestra, comes kirsch, blowing a wild trumpet blast; gin and whisky, deafening the palate with their harsh outbursts of comets and trombones; liqueur brandy, blaring with the overwhelming crash of the tubas, while the thunder
peals of the cymbals and the big drum, beaten might and main, are reproduced in the mouth by the rakis of Chios and the mastics.
— 

Joris-Karl Huysmans, Against Nature

He was convinced too that the same analogy might be pushed yet further, that quartettes of stringed instruments might be contrived to play upon the palatal arch, with the violin represented by old brandy, delicate and heady, biting and clean toned; with the alto, simulated by rum, more robust, more rumbling, more heavy in tone; with vespetro, long drawn, pathetic, as sad and tender as a violoncello; with the double bass, full bodied, solid and black as a fine, old bitter beer. One might even, if anxious to make a quintette, add yet another instrument,—the harp, mimicked with a sufficiently close approximation by the keen savor, the silvery note, clear and self-sufficing, of dry cumin.

2014 a year of books

The Pier Glass, Robert Graves

Poor Folk, Fyodor Dostoevsky

The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera

Within a Budding Grove, Marcel Proust

Journey to the End of Night, Louis Ferdinand Celine

Skippy Dies, Paul Murray

The Lifted Veil, George Eliot

The Land of the Blessed Virgin, W. Somerset Maugham

1914 and Other Poems, Rupert Brooke

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson

Fair Penitent, Nicholas Rowe

The Box Man, Kobo Abe

City of Night, John Rechy

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Tom Robbins

Brazilian Tales, Carmen Dolores

The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Machado Assis

The Chosen, Chaim Potok

Falconer, John Cheever

The Republic of Wine, Mo Yan

The Immoralist, Andre Gide

The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes

A Woman of No Importance, Oscar Wilde

Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

The Woman in the Dunes, Kobo Abe

Lady Windermere’s Fan, Oscar Wilde

Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard, Kiran Desai

Laughter in the Dark, Vladimir Nabokov

Catilina, Henrik Ibsen

Money, Martin Amis

The Duchess of Padua, Oscar Wilde

The Artist of Disappearance, Anita Desai

To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf

Fasting, Feasting, Anita Desai

The Portrait, Ford Madox Ford

Balthazar, Lawrence Durrell

Vera, Oscar Wilde

The Crying of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon

Wait Until Spring, Bandini, John Fante

Modeste Mignon, Honore de Balzac

Doctor Faustus, Thomas Mann

Bolshevism in English Literature, William Talbot Allison

A Single Man, Christopher Isherwood

Nana, Emile Zola

Our House in the Last World, Oscar Hijuelos

Notes from the Underground, Fyodor Dostoevsky

Dona Perfecta, Benito Perez Galdos

A Separate Reality, Carlos Castaneda

The Optimist’s Daughter, Eudora Welty

An Artist of the Floating World, Kazuo Ishiguro

Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Pierre Chonderlos de Laclos

Auguste Rodin, Rainer Maria Rilke

Chamber Music, James Joyce

The Last of the Star Kings, Edmond Hamilton

Kokoro, Natsume Soseki

Oedipus Rex, Sophocles

The Eye in the Pyramid, Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson

Black Spring, Henry Miller

Agamemnon, Aeschylus

Glenarvon, Caroline Lamb

The Iliad, Homer

The Russian Roots of Nazism, Michael Kellogg

The Balcony, Jean Genet

A Man of the People, Chinua Achebe

Couples, John Updike

The Soft Machine, William S. Burroughs

Pierre, Herman Melville

Outlaw of Gor, John Norman

English Literature, Stopford Augustus Brook

Tarnsman of Gor, John Norman

Eichmann in Jerusalem, Hannah Arendt

Endgame, Frank Brady

The Subterraneans, Jack Kerouac

Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler

The Captain’s Daughter, Alexander Pushkin

Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe

The Phantom of the Opera, Gaston Leroux

Justine, Lawrence Durrell

The Blunderer, Moliere

Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert

The Hero, W. Somerset Maugham

Foundation, Issac Asimov

The Trespasser, D.H. Lawrence

Numbers, John Rechy

The Possessed, Fyodor Dostoevsky

Nicolo Paganini, Stephen Samuel Stratton

La-Bas, Joris-Karl Huysmans

The Tin Drum, Gunter Grass

Edward II, Christopher Marlowe

The Masterpiece, Emile Zola

The Unclassed, George Gissing

The Food of the Gods, H. G. Wells

The Coming of the Night, John Rechy

A Princess of Mars, Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Aeneid, Virgil

White Nights, Fyodor Dostoevsky

The Siege of Corinth, Parisina, Lord Byron

The Lost Continent, Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Circle, W. Somerset Maugham

The Time Machine, H.G. Wells

The Monk, Matthew Lewis

Confessions of a Travelling Salesman, Timothy Lea

Midnight’s Children, Salman Rushdie



En su mayor parte, la humanidad está compuesta de criminales inconscientes y de imbéciles que ni siquiera se dan cuenta de las consecuencias de sus errores. A estos los salva su perfecta ignorancia. En cuanto a quienes se embrutecen deliberadamente, es evidente que son más culpables, pero la sociedad, que detesta a las personas superiores, ya se encarga de castigarlos […]. De modo que es mucho más ventajoso ser un imbécil, pues ello nos salva en la tierra y en el cielo.
—  Joris-Karl Huysmans, En route
He won a great reputation as an eccentric,—a reputation he crowned by adopting a costume of black velvet worn with a gold fringed waistcoat and sticking by way of cravat a bunch of Parma violets in the opening of a very low necked shirt. Then he would invite parties of literary friends to dinners that set all the world talking. In one instance in particular, modeling the entertainment on a banquet of the eighteenth century, he had organized a funeral feast in celebration of the most unmentionable of minor personal calamities.
—  Joris-Karl Huysmans, Against Nature
(Baudelaire) had descended to the bottom of the inexhaustible mine, had picked his way along abandoned or unexplored galleries, and had finally reached those districts of the soul where the monstrous vegetations of the sick mind flourish. There, near the breeding ground of intellectuals aberrations and disease of the mind - the mysterious tetanus, the burning fever of lust, the thyphoids and yellow fevers of crime – he had found, hatching in the dismal forcing-house of ennui, the frightening climacteric of thoughts and emotions.
—  Joris-Karl Huysmans, Against Nature