jonathan-romney

theguardian.com
The 25 greatest summer films
Which movies best capture the holiday season? Observer film critics choose their sizzling-hot favourites
By Mark Kermode

5. Unrelated

Joanna Hogg (2007)

The ultimate Brits-abroad nightmare-holiday film, in which a middle-aged woman (Kathryn Worth) joins her posh friends at their Tuscany retreat. Arriving alone, she not only feels increasingly like a spare part, but risks her dignity as she tries to attract a young alpha male – a first big-screen sighting of Tom Hiddleston. If this subtly painful comedy of manners isn’t teeth-grinding enough for you, try the male counterpart – Suntan (Argyris Papadimitropoulos, 2016) in which a doctor on a Greek island falls horribly in love with a carefree Lolita among the Euro-vacationers. Both films should come prefaced by warnings for viewers of either sex aged above, say, 35. Jonathan Romney

2

5. Unrelated
Joanna Hogg (2007)

The ultimate Brits-abroad nightmare-holiday film, in which a middle-aged woman (Kathryn Worth) joins her posh friends at their Tuscany retreat. Arriving alone, she not only feels increasingly like a spare part, but risks her dignity as she tries to attract a young alpha male – a first big-screen sighting of Tom Hiddleston. If this subtly painful comedy of manners isn’t teeth-grinding enough for you, try the male counterpart – Suntan (Argyris Papadimitropoulos, 2016) in which a doctor on a Greek island falls horribly in love with a carefree Lolita among the Euro-vacationers. Both films should come prefaced by warnings for viewers of either sex aged above, say, 35. Jonathan Romney

Cumberbatch gets to wear an even more spectacular coat than he does as the BBC Sherlock Holmes – baggier, more billowing and with a hood. As for his voice, it’s so sepulchrally resonant that it could have been synthesised from the combined timbres of Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart and Alan Rickman holding an elocution contest down a well. And he flares a mean nostril, to boot.
Slow cinema is not a movement. It is a way of thinking about film, about slowing down perception as if you had to lower your heartbeat or metabolism while watching. It’s like dreaming, which can also be stimulating in that you become acutely aware of image, of sound, of things slowing down. You can zone out and be bored, but you may also find it retunes you.
—  Jonathan Romney