joint terminal attack controllers

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U.S. Army Special Forces snipers, assigned to the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Operational Detachment-A and U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers, assigned to the 284th Air Support Operation Squadron, guide AH1 Cobra attack helicopters, assigned to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing conducting a close air support mission during Integrated Training Exercise 2-16 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Feb. 16, 2016.

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JTACs participate in Serpentex 16’

CORSICA, France – U.S. Air Force Airmen, along with 11 additional NATO countries officially kicked off the French-led Exercise SERPENTEX 16 on the island of Corsica, France, March 7.

Approximately 215 U.S. Air Force Airmen, including joint terminal attack controllers from the 2nd Air Support Operations Squadron, from Vilseck, Germany, are participating in the annual exercise held at NATO’s tactical training center and the French Air Force’s Air Base 126, Solenzara.

The multinational exercise is focused on the training of U.S. and NATO aircrew and JTACs on the air and land integration mission, to include close air support, dynamic targeting, strike coordination and reconnaissance and live ordnance operations.

JTACs are considered qualified service members who direct the action of air and surface based fire at the tactical level. They are the Airmen on the ground with the authority to control and call in airstrikes on target.

“There are times like when we are deployed when we work with JTACs from other countries and sometimes we do things a little differently,” said Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Rarang, 2nd ASOS JTAC. “This exercise is giving us the opportunity to build partnership capacity and know how to better work with our allies when we are in those situations.”

Exercise SERPENTEX has occurred annually since 2008 and has contributed to the development of U.S. and NATO relations, capabilities, interoperability and multinational training between allies.

Other U.S. Air Force participants include three B-52 “Stratofortress” bombers from the 2nd Bomb Wing, Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. Other countries participating include France, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, Spain and the United Kingdom.

“Exercises like SERPENTEX are exciting and extremely useful because we get to learn different countries’ equipment and how they would control in a real-word scenario,” said Senior Airman Gage Duvall, 2nd ASOS JTAC. “I know that we will be able to learn a few things from all the different JTACs and hopefully they will get to learn something from us.”

The training exercise will continue through March 25 with a variety of training scenarios to increase the Air Force’s ability to work side-by-side with its European allies and partners.

B-1B Lancer aircraft assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, prepares for takeoff from Andersen AFB, Guam, to a conduct bilateral training mission with Royal Australian Air Force Joint Terminal Attack Controllers July 18, 2017. The mission was part of Talisman Saber 17, a training exercise designed to maximize combined training opportunities and conduct maritime preposition and logistics operations in the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Smoot)

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Joint Terminal Attack Controllers and air crews from multiple states work together during Northern Strike 2016 training exercises being conducted, Aug. 1-20, 2016. Northern Strike 16 is a National Guard Bureau-sponsored exercise uniting approximately 5,000 Army, Air Force, Marine, and Special Forces service members from 20 states and three coalition countries during the first three weeks of August 2016 at the Camp Grayling Joint Maneuver Training Center and the Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center, both located in northern Michigan. The exercise strives to provide accessible, readiness-building opportunities for military units from all service branches to achieve and sustain proficiency in conducting mission command, air, sea, and ground maneuver integration, and the synchronization of fires in a joint, multinational, decisive action environment.

Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, was killed during combat operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan when the assault force triggered an improvised explosive device.

Domeij was a Ranger Joint Terminal Attack Controller assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Co., 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

He was on his 14th combat deployment to Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror.

Domeij was born October 5, 1982 in Santa Ana, Calif. After graduating from Rancho Bernardo High School in 2000, he enlisted in the U.S. Army in July, 2001 from San Diego, Calif.

Domeij completed Basic Combat Training and Fire Support Advanced Individual Training at Fort Sill, Okla. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program at Fort Benning.

Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, Domeij was assigned to Co. C, 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment in 2002 where he served as a Forward Observer. He also served in Headquarters and Headquarters Co. (HHC), as a Reconnaissance Joint Terminal Attack Controller, Co., B as the Fire Support Noncommissioned Officer, and again in HHC as the Battalion Fires Support Noncommissioned Officer.

Domeij was also a Joint Terminal Attack Controller - Evaluator and was one of the first Army qualified JTAC’s, training which is usually reserved for members of the Air Force.

Domeij’s military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the Warrior Leader’s Course, the Advanced Leader’s Course, the Senior Leader’s Course, U.S. Army Ranger School, Jumpmaster School, Pathfinder School, Joint Firepower Control Course, and Joint Fires Observer Course.
His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, Combat Action Badge, Expert Infantry Badge, Senior Parachutist Badge, the Pathfinder Badge and the U.S. Army Expert Rifle Marksmanship Qualification Badge.

He has also been awarded the Bronze Star Medal with one oak leaf cluster, the Joint Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with four oak leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal with three loops, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with two campaign stars, Iraq Campaign Medal with three campaign stars, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon with numeral three, Army Service Ribbon, and the Overseas Ribbon with numeral four.

He will be posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, and the Meritorious Service Medal.

He is survived by his wife, Sarah and daughters Mikajsa and Aaliyah of Lacey, Wash.; his mother Scoti Domeij of Colorado Springs, Colo., and his brother Kyle Domeij of San Diego, California.

Pvt. 1st Class Christopher Alexander Horns, 20, was killed during combat operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan when the assault force triggered an improvised explosive device.

Horns was a Ranger automatic rifleman assigned to Co. C, 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. He was on his first deployment to Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror.

Horns was born Nov. 10, 1990 in Sumter, S.C. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in July, 2010 from his hometown of Colorado Springs, Colo.

Horns completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Ga., as an infantryman. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program also at Fort Benning. Following graduation from Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, Horns was assigned to Co. C, where he served as an assistant machine gunner and automatic rifleman.

His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course and the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program.

His awards and decorations include the Parachutist Badge and the U.S. Army Expert Rifle Marksmanship Qualification Badge. He has also been awarded the National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and Army Service Ribbon. Horns will be posthumously awarded the Purple Heart, the Army Commendation Medal for Combat Service, the Army Commendation Medal for Peacetime Service, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal and the Combat Infantry Badge.

He is survived by his parents Larry and Tamara Horns, and his sister Tiffany of Colorado Springs, Colo.

As Rangers, Domeij and Horns selflessly lived their lives for others and distinguished themselves as members of the Army’s premier direct action raid force and fought valiantly as they served their fellow Rangers and our great Nation.

- RANGERS LEAD THE WAY! -

Sword International MK-17 Mod 0 Tyrant 22

.308 AR-10 variant with a self-regulating short stroke gas piston operating system. Uses a side-charging handle upper with a 16″ long barrel. The rifle is named after a fallen Ranger who’s call sign was Tyrant 22.

Named after Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, who was killed on his 14th deployment in Afghanistan on October 22, 2011. He was the Army’s first qualified Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) evaluator and his call sign was Tyrant 22. Kristoffer holds the ‘distinction’ of being the most deployed soldier in American history to be killed in action. Fearless in life and in combat, Domeij is remembered by friends and comrades as a consummate warrior and true professional. Col. Mark W. Odom, commander of the 75th Ranger Regiment, said Domeij was a veteran of hundreds of combat missions “whose ability to employ fire support platforms made him a game changer on the battlefield — an operator who in real terms had the value of an entire strike force on the battlefield.” Lt. Col. David Hodne, his battalion commander, said “this was a Ranger you wanted at your side when the chips were down.”

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BEL - Pathfinder JTAC Team

Photographed with the Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) Team of the Belgian Light Brigade Pathfinder Platoon during the Non-Combatant Evacuation Operation exercise Storm Tide 3 in June 2016.

Late Night Nookie #soldierporn: Showboating.

U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornets deploy heat flairs during a combat patrol in support of ground troops in Afghanistan. Trust between joint terminal attack controllers and pilots serves as an important aspect of close air support missions.

(Photo by Staff Sergeant Aaron Allman, 15 DEC 2008.)

Security

A Czech Republic Joint Terminal Attack controller from the Train, Advise, Assist Command - Air, guides a Afghan Air Force Mi-17 onto the landing zone, while US Army Soldiers provide security, April 9, 2015, at a training range outside of Kabul, Afghanistan. The AAF demonstrated the capabilities of the MD-530F’s two FN M3P .50 Cal machine guns to local media and Afghan military leaders. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Perry Aston/Released)

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FORT BLISS, Texas — Fighter planes, helicopters, artillery and ground troops teamed up for a large-scale, integrated training scenario during Exercise IRON STRIKE, Dec. 1-13, 2014, at Fort Bliss, Texas.

Exercise IRON STRIKE is a joint-service, combined live-fire exercise hosted by the U.S. Army’s 1st Armored Division and supported by the 74th Fighter Squadron supplying close air support via the A-10C Thunderbolt II. Joint terminal attack controllers from the 7th Air Support Operations Squadron ultimately control the airspace over the battlefield, serving as a liaison between the aircraft above and the artillery on the ground. Additional assets included U-28As, MQ-1B Predators, MQ-9 Reapers and F-16 Fighting Falcons.

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U.S. Army Scout Snipers with Alpha Company, 3rd Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment and Air Force joint terminal attack controllers assigned to Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, during weapons qualification. Oct. 14, 2015, at Arta, Djibouti. Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, is the East Africa Response Force, the quick response force for all of the countries within the HOA.