joint exercise

Venezuela, citizens “loyal” to the Maduro regime receive military gear, most notably surplus FN FAL battle rifles, in preparation for the 2017 Soberanía Bolivariana joint civilian and military exercises, launched in response to threads of a United States military intervention against the regime.

Notice the high number of senior citizens, many effectively forced to participate, as otherwise their pensions, given by the late president Chavez, can be removed, like it happened to those that were caught supporting the anti-regime protests.

Special thanks to @bertmacklin-atf for the video!

That missile didn't come out of nowhere

Some facts about recent USA-N Korea tensions:

- Prior to the North Korean missile, Japan had just tested its M142 High-Mobility Artillery Rocket System.

- this test was related to operation Northern Viper (NV17), a US-Japan military drill exercise which took place on Hokkaido from 10-28 of August. US Marines and Japanese ground troops were involved, as well as F-16 fighters, MV-22 Osprey aircraft and military helicopters.

- Every year the USA also conducts something called the Ulchi-Freedom Guardian war games. Lasting 10 days, it involves many thousands of troops from South Korean and the USA, as well as some from Australia, and serves as a show of force and rehearsal for war with North Korea. North Korean leadership has repeatedly objected to these drills. (Australia hosts US military bases, as well as US troops, aircraft and warships).

- yesterday, Ja Song Nam, North Korea’s ambassador to the UN asked the UN Security Council for urgent talks on these military exercises. He said they were like “fuel to [an] open fire” and he pointed out that the exercises were “a provocative and aggressive joint military exercise at this critical moment of the Korean Peninsula, where the situation is just like a time bomb.”

- US trade sanctions have hit North Korea at a time when their harvest has been poor and food supplies are low. The population is suffering.

4

Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Hostage Rescue Team.
Law Enforcement’s Tier 1 Counter-Terrorism unit.

The FBI Hostage Rescue Team (HRT) is the counter-terrorism and hostage rescue unit of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The HRT is trained to rescue American citizens and allies who are held hostage by hostile forces, usually terrorists and/or criminals. The Hostage Rescue Team was founded in 1982 by Danny Coulson, former Deputy Assistant Director of the FBI, and completed its final certification exercise in October 1983.

It was originally composed of 50 operators. However, this number has since increased to well over 90 full-time operators. The HRT commonly functions as a high-level national SWAT team in extremely sensitive or dangerous situations. Today, it is part of the Tactical Support Branch of the FBI’s Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG) and is based at the FBI Academy at the Quantico Marine Corps Base, in Stafford County, Virginia.

The primary roles of the HRT are hostage rescue and counter-terrorism. Secondary roles of the HRT include:

- Apprehending barricaded subjects
- Executing helicopter operations and rescue missions
- Executing mobile assaults
- Performing high-risk raids, searches, arrests, and warrants
- Coordinating manhunt and rural operations
- Providing force protection for FBI personnel overseas

To a lesser extent, the HRT may deploy teams or individual operators to act as snipers, or to provide protective service details for certain high-profile federal witnesses or dignitaries. Teams provide support for missions overseas and support Joint Terrorism Task Forces. Teams at home and abroad perform typical law enforcement activities, such as making arrests, processing scenes for evidence recovery, and testifying in court.

The HRT has provided traditional law enforcement during hurricane relief operations, tactical surveys, and special events such as the Olympic Games, presidential inaugurations, and political conventions.

Prospective HRT operators are selected based upon their background and experience, as well as their demonstrated performance during the HRT selection course. The rigorous two-week selection process includes long-distance runs, forced marches, obstacle courses, and other tests of physical and mental stamina. Throughout the entire selection process, candidates are evaluated on their ability to think under pressure and to perform while physically exhausted. After a six-month initial training period known as “New Operator Training School” (“NOTS”), they are headquartered at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Both the selection course and NOTS are near mirror images of the 1st SFOD-D (“Delta Force”) selection and training courses, with some minor adjustments for mission differences. Experienced HRT operators assigned to observer/sniper teams are sent to the United States Marine Corps Scout Sniper Basic Course. After successfully completing the course, they receive further instruction from HRT snipers. Maritime platoon operators are sent to a variety of maritime special operations courses, including Phase II of U.S. Navy BUD/S at Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado, California. HRT operators receive other specialized interoperability training from various U.S. Special Operations Command entities. HRT operators also conduct training with Allied nation counter-terrorism units such as the British SAS and German GSG-9.

When not operationally deployed, the HRT conducts full-time training for its members at various sites across the country. Two to three hours each day are set aside for physical training, a defensive tactics session, and combative training. One day a week is devoted to maintaining either perishable skills (such as fast roping, breaching, and photography) or specialized skills (such as mobile assaults, manhunt and rural operations), maritime operations, helicopter operations, parachuting, weapons of mass destruction training (provided by the United States Department of Energy), and cold weather operations. Three days are spent honing sniping or close quarters combat skills on the various training ranges available to the team. Biweekly, one day is allotted for gear maintenance. Discretionary time to be used by team leaders is built into the schedule. During a routine week of training, it is not unusual for HRT operators to fire 1,000 rounds of ammunition to keep their shooting skills honed. Every 12 to 18 months, the HRT also participates in at least one major combined exercise that may involve a variety of governmental entities, such as the FBI and the departments of Defense, State, Energy, and Homeland Security.

Three teams rotate through three 120-day cycles: training, operations, and support. During the training cycle, the team refreshes its skills and takes part in exercises, attends other courses, or trains with foreign and domestic units. During the operations cycle, the team is available for deployment (domestic or foreign). During the support cycle, the team works on special projects, maintains the HRT’s equipment, and conducts research.

The HRT is known to conduct joint training exercises and participate in exchange programs with US military units such as the US Army’s Combat Applications Group (otherwise known as 1st SFOD-D or Delta Force) or the U.S. Navy’s DEVGRU. The HRT routinely trains with other federal tactical teams such as the DEA’s FAST Team, the United States Border Patrol’s BORTAC unit or the United States Capitol Police’s CERT. Occasionally the HRT trains with French GIGN, British SAS and Special Boat Service, Irish Garda ERU, the Australian SAS, German GSG 9, and other international units. In addition to the HRT’s own facilities, the HRT routinely uses private and 1st SFOD-D Delta Force shoot houses and ranges. The HRT has also been known to train at Camp Peary and Harvey Point.

INDONESIA, SITUBONDO : In this photograph taken on August 8, 2015, US Marines play an Indonesian traditional game of climbing a slippery pole to get bottles of coke as a prize during a joint exercise with Indonesian marine counterparts at Banongan beach in Situbondo, on eastern Java island. About 676 soldiers from both countries were involved in their four-day joint exercise. AFP PHOTO / JUNI KRISWANTO                        

Without a doubt, the A-10 cockpit is one of the world’s coolest offices.

Capt. Todd Campbell, A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot from the 66th Weapons Squadron, United States Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., parks his jet prior to the start of exercise Hustler Trough II, at Biggs Army Airfield on Fort Bliss, Texas, Oct. 31, 2015. Hustler Trough II is a week-long joint fires exercise designed to enhance synergy between more than ten different Army and Air Force units. (U.S. Army photo by: Staff Sgt. Marcus Fichtl)

Atlantic Ocean (July 19, 2005) - Four F-14B Tomcats, assigned to the “Swordsmen” of Fighter Squadron Three Two (VF-32), perform a diamond formation fly-by at the conclusion of Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) fly-off aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). The current underway-period marks the final time the F-14 Tomcat will take part in flight operations while embarked aboard Truman. VF-32 will shortly begin the process of transitioning to the newer F/A-18F Super Hornet. Truman is currently conducting carrier qualifications and operations off the East Coast and is also participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). JTFEX is a key component in the training cycle of an aircraft carrier and carrier air wing in the U.S. Navy Fleet Response Plan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Kristopher Wilson (RELEASED)

A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 251 taxis down a flightline during a joint training exercise

GULF OF ALASKA (June 22, 2009) An Air Force F-22 Raptor executes a supersonic flyby over the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). John C. Stennis is participating in Northern Edge 2009, a joint exercise focusing on detecting and tracking units at sea, in the air and on land. (U.S. Navy photo by Sonar Technician(Surface) 1st Class Ronald Dejarnett/Released)

Atlantic Ocean (July 28, 2006) An F-14D Tomcat, aircraft number 100, assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31) makes a near supersonic fly-by above the flight deck of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The F-14 will officially retire in September 2006, after 32 years of service to the fleet. Theodore Roosevelt is completing Joint Task Force Exercises with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Nathan Laird (RELEASED)