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I don’t read stuff about me online, like specific tweets or anything, but when I hear about myself through word of mouth it’s really cool. I love hearing people’s response to my character, or appearances on things like The Graham Norton Show. Doing the press for The Force Awakens was so much fun.

Hamilton characters as things my choir director Billy has said

Alex: *aggressively patting head* iM STRESSED

Burr: sHIT

Eliza: sing, my sweet Puerto Rican Angel child

Angelica: *lays down in the middle of the floor* *covers face with sheet music* I’m ignoring you

Peggy: *electrocutes self setting up the sound system* SHHHHHHHH-I MEAN SUGAR SMACKS

Laurens: stop touching his nipples, Dennis

Lafayette: I’m catfishing someone in Russia I told him that if he took care of Putin I’d give him 15 soccer balls

Herc: I’m gonna shove an A2 up your butt

Dad™Washington: *bouncing slightly up and down with eyes shut* YAS SING IT

King™George: you best not come back here, little twat

Jefferson: go make me coffee, peasant

Madison: I may be out of shape but- no, there’s not an end to that sentence

Phillip: *drags a chair across room* *stands on chair and stabs a pair of scissors into the ceiling* art

Maria: ABC, give me the D

The 1994 masterpiece Baby’s Day Out is basically Home Alone if Macaulay Culkin couldn’t walk or speak and kept catastrophically injuring the Wet Bandits completely by accident: A wealthy New York family’s baby gets kidnapped, he escapes, and (spoiler alert) shenanigans ensue. Also like Home Alone, it was written by John Hughes, who clearly had some scary gambling debts to pay off.

It’s dumb and forgettable – unless you happen to be one of its many, many Indian fans. According to Roger Ebert, while visiting a movie theater in Calcutta he asked if Star Wars had been their most successful American film, and was told, “Nay. That honor belongs to Baby’s Day Out.” The theater Ebert visited had been playing it for more than a year, because something about the constant imperilment of an infant really speaks to the working class of India.

Its inexplicable success earned it not one but two Indian remakes. The first, Sisindri, is a staggering two hours and 11 minutes long, because the antics of a baby going places a baby normally should not go simply cannot be done justice by a mere 90-minute narrative.

It was then remade again under the name of, uh, James Bond, because India is where copyright law goes when it wants to just get away for the weekend. And before you ask, yes, it absolutely has several musical numbers.

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