john-mccrae

The Secret Reading List: Books mentioned in The Secret History

If you want to be as erudite and elite as the Classics Clique, you’d better add these books to your reading pile…

Specific prose/poetry/plays mentioned:

Untimely Meditations by Friedrich Nietzsche, Epigraph
Republic, Book II by Plato, Epigraph
Tom Swift by Victor Appleton, 6
Paradise Lost by John Milton, 8, 91
Goodbye, Columbus by Philip Roth, 33
The New Testament, 36
Agamemnon by Aeschylus, 40
Oresteia by Aeschylus, 40
Inferno by Dante, 41, 115
Poetics by Aristotle, 41
The Iliad by Homer, 41, 627
The Bacchae by Euripides, 42, 204
Parmenides by Plato, 67
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott, 85
Rover Boys by Edward Stratemeyer, 85
Journey from Chester to London by Thomas Pennant, 85
The Club History of London by ?, 85
The Pirates of Penzance by W.S. Gilbert, 85
Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, 85
Marino Faliero by Lord Byron, 85
The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot, 89
Sherlock Homes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 92, 622
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, 94
Mémoires by Duc de Saint-Simon, 103
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, 110
Othello by Shakespeare, 115
The World Book Encyclopedia, 117
Men of Thought and Deed by E. Tipton Chatsford
Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up by J. M. Barrie, 180
The Divine Comedy by Dante, 184
Superman Comics, 417
The Upanishads, 441, 466
Perry Mason Novels by Erle Stanley Gardner, 442
With Rue my Heart is Laden by A.E. Housman, 466
Lycidas by John Milton, 466
The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson, 466
In Flanders Fields by John McCrae, 466
Corpus of Mycenaean Inscriptions from Knossos, 481
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, 554
The Malcontent by John Marston, 615
The White Devil by John Webster, 615
The Broken Heart by John Ford, epilogue epigraph, 615
Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe, 616
The Revenger’s Tragedy by Cyril Tourneur, 616
Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens, 619

Authors mentioned:

J.R.R. Tolkien, 6
Ezra Pound, 16
T.S. Eliot, 16
Alfred Douglas, 18
Robert de Montesquiou, 18
Plato, 22, 36
Homer, 23, 36, 49, 509
Dante, 33
Virgil, 33
Plotinus, 37
Marie Corelli, 85
Shakespeare, 91, 615
Alexander Pope, 103
John Donne, 117
Rupert Brooke, 120
Edgar Allen Poe, 132, 200
Hegel, 139
Raymond Chandler, 153
Gregory of Tours, 481
Thomas Aquinas, 509
P.G. Wodehouse, 538
George Orwell, 576-7
Harold Acton, 577
Salman Rushdie, 582
Agatha Christie, 587
Proust, 612
John Webster, 615
Thomas Middleton, 615
Cyril Tourneur, 615
John Ford, 615
Christopher Marlowe, 615
Walter Raleigh, 615
Thomas Nashe, 615

NB: page numbers correspond to the Popular Penguin Edition.

Sir John Gielgud reads
In Flanders Fields
by John McCrae (1872-1918)

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
   That mark our place; and in the sky
   The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
                  In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
     The torch; be yours to hold it high.
      If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
                   In Flanders fields. 

- John McCrae

Remembrance Sunday

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

-In Flanders Fields, John McCrae 1915

In Flanders Fields

May 1915, by Lt. Col. John McCrae, MD (Canadian, 1872-1918)

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place, and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

2

May 3rd 1915: ‘In Flanders Fields’ written

On this day in 1915, Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote the famous war poem ‘In Flanders Fields’. He wrote it sitting in an ambulance after presiding over the funeral of his friend who had died at the Second Battle of Ypres. Originally he was not happy with his poem, but once it was published it became very popular, and still is today considered one of the greatest poems of the First World War. Its references to red poppies growing over the graves of soldiers led to the use of the poppy as a symbol of remembrance for fallen soldiers.

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.”

2
"In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields."
-John McCrae

In Flanders’ fields, the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved,
and now we lie
In Flanders’ fields.

Take up the quarrel with the foe!
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch. Be yours to lift it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies blow
In Flanders’ fields.

—  In Flanders’ Fields, by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow,
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead.
Short days ago,
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw,
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow,
In Flanders fields.

(John McCrae, May 1915)

Lest We Forget

In Flanders fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago,
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

– Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae (1872–1918)

We Will Remember Them.

Happy ANZAC Day.

John McCrae - In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

      - Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, Flanders Fields

One day too early for Remembrance day, I know - But I’ve been meaning to draw something for tomorrow and got some free time now. Maybe for my birthday I’ll convince my dad to drive up to Ottawa to visit the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier - Plus, there’s a really awesome war museum up there too.

TLSP 2016 pre-gig tape

For those who were able to see The Last Shadow Puppets live in 2016, these songs might bring back some warm memories. It are the songs Miles Kane and Alex Turner hand-picked to play before and after each gig and in between support act and main act. It’s the TLSP 2016 pre-gig tape!

Aaron Neville - Tell It Like It Is
Al Martino - Volare (Nel Blu Di Pinto Di Blu)
Bob Marley & The Wailers - Soul Rebel
Carole King - I Feel The Earth Move
David Bowie - Golden Years
Dion - Born to Be With You
Dr. Hook - Sexy Eyes
Dr. Hook - When You’re In Love With A Beautiful Woman
Dr. John - Such A Night
George McCrae - Rock Your Baby
Harry Nilsson - Jump Into The Fire
Jacques Dutronc - Les Cactus
Joe Cocker - The Letter
Marvin Gaye - Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)
Maxine Nightingale - Right Back Where We Started From
Nick Lowe - I Love the Sound of Breaking Glass
Paul McCartney - Coming Up
Paul McCartney & Wings - Let ‘Em In
Serge Gainsbourg - Initials B.B.
Smokie - Don’t Play Your Rock 'N’ Roll To Me
Super Furry Animals - Juxtapozed With U
The Beach Boys - Got To Know the Woman
The Style Council - It Didn’t Matter
The Style Council - Long Hot Summer
The Temptations - Let Your Hair Down
The Three Degrees - Collage
Todd Rundgren - I Saw The Light
Toto - Georgy Porgy
Urge Overkill - Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon

Here in a handy Spotify playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/119583062/playlist/0ZuMITxkdQG3TQZmJd5pQi

The field poppy is an annual plant which flowers each year between about May and August. It’s seeds are disseminated on the wind and can lie dormant in the ground for a long time. If the ground is disturbed from the early spring the seeds will germinate and the poppy flowers will grow.

This is what happened in parts of the front lines in Belgium and France. Once the ground was disturbed by the fighting, the poppy seeds lying in the ground began to germinate and grow during the warm weather in the spring and summer months of 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918. The field poppy was also blooming in parts of the Turkish battlefields on the Gallipoli penninsular when the ANZAC and British Forces arrived at the start of the campaign in April 1915.

“In Flanders Fields the Poppies Blow…”

The sight of these delicate, vibrant red flowers growing on the shattered ground caught the attention of a Canadian soldier by the name of John McCrae. He noticed how they had sprung up in the disturbed ground of the burials around the artillery position he was in. It was during the warm days of early May 1915 when he found himself with his artillery brigade near to the Ypres-Yser canal. He is believed to have composed a poem following the death of a friend at that time. The first lines of the poem have become some of the most famous lines written in relation to the First World War.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

N’oublions pas

Au champ d'honneur, les coquelicots
Sont parsemés de lot en lot
Auprès des croix; et dans l'espace
Les alouettes devenues lasses
Mêlent leurs chants au sifflement
Des obusiers.

Nous sommes morts,
Nous qui songions la veille encor’
À nos parents, à nos amis,
C'est nous qui reposons ici,
Au champ d'honneur.

À vous jeunes désabusés,
À vous de porter l'oriflamme
Et de garder au fond de l'âme
Le goût de vivre en liberté.
Acceptez le défi, sinon
Les coquelicots se faneront
Au champ d'honneur.

– Lieutenant-colonel John McCrae