john-mccrae

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May 3rd 1915: ‘In Flanders Fields’ written

On this day in 1915, Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote the famous war poem ‘In Flanders Fields’. He wrote it sitting in an ambulance after presiding over the funeral of his friend who had died at the Second Battle of Ypres. Originally he was not happy with his poem, but once it was published it became very popular, and still is today considered one of the greatest poems of the First World War. Its references to red poppies growing over the graves of soldiers led to the use of the poppy as a symbol of remembrance for fallen soldiers.

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.”

2

Perinatal Osteogenesis Imperfecta (probably type II) and Blue Sclerae of OI

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), also known as brittle bone disease, is a set of disorders that involves the malformation or insufficient formation of collagen.

All types of this condition are genetic, and are present at birth. Types I through V are autosomal dominant, and Types VI through VII are autosomal recessive. Given the severity of types II and III, the fact that they’re autosomal dominant rarely comes into play.

Most variants of OI (but not type IV) display blue sclerae, which is one of the primary diagnostic criteria. X-rays showing multiple bone fractures in varying stages of healing are also common in OI, and the x-ray above shows many nodules where the ribs and arms have fractured during the antenatal period.

In the past, OI was often assumed to be rickets or osteomalacia, and in the modern era, child abuse is often suspected when symptoms aside from frequent fractures are not present.

A Text-Book of Pathology for Students of Medicine. J. George Adami and John McCrae, 1912.

Remembrance Sunday

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

-In Flanders Fields, John McCrae 1915

In Flanders Fields

May 1915, by Lt. Col. John McCrae, MD (Canadian, 1872-1918)

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place, and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


In Flanders Fields, by Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, MD
May 3rd, 1915

lest we forget, by hobvias sudomeighm
November 2nd, 2004

In Flanders Field

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae

It is exactly one century ago that the First World War broke out in 1914 and today is the annual Remembrance Day to remind of its victims.
John McCrae, one of the estimated 37,000,000 people who died during this horrific war, wrote the poem In Flanders Fields and made the poppy a symbol of remembrance.
I believe that we learn about the past in order to learn for the future. There are still wars raging around the world and both soldiers and civilians are suffering from these futile conflicts.

Don’t forget the lives war has cost in the past. Don’t let it happen again in the future.

Image source: google images

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
Flanders fields.

Written during the First World War by Canadian physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae 

3

“A 17-year-old John McCrae Secondary School student in Ottawa has died following a severe head injury she sustained during a rugby game last week.

Rowan Stringer was captain of the high school rugby team this year, her second as a member, said her father, Gordon Stringer. She also played in a Barrhaven rugby club last summer after school ended and was planning to join again this summer.

The teen was tackled hard during a game on Wednesday, flew through the air and hit her head and neck on the ground, Stringer said. Rowan stayed awake for a few moments after sitting up, then slipped into unconsciousness.

She never woke up.

Rowan was taken to hospital, where doctors tried unsuccessfully to relieve the pressure in her head.

She died on Sunday night after her family decided to discontinue life support the previous day.”

Rest in peace Rowan Stringer <3

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2013/05/13/ottawa-rowan-stringer-rugby-death-injury-head-trauma.html

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

—   John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
that mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow.
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields. 

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. 

- John McCrae

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


John McCrae, May 1915