john lennon paul mccartney bottom: george harrison ringo starr

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Cilla, John and Paul on the set of the Beatles: ‘The Music Of Lennon & McCartney’, on 1st November 1965.  

“It was thanks to John Lennon that I got my big break in music. I first met John when I was fifteen years old and attending the Anfield Commercial College. My girlfriend Pauline said to me that you really ought to come down and see my boyfriend play at the Iron Door, which was a sort of glorified youth club there at Anfield. Well, her boyfriend was George Harrison and the band was the Beatles. We went in a crowd of girls from the school, and they all said to the boys onstage, “Give Cilla a go!” because I had been singing at lunch parties and clubs in Liverpool, wherever I could, so they said, “Let her have a go!” and from the stage John said “Okay, Cyrill”—he called me “Cyrill,” the man’s name, he was always calling me that, his little joke because of course he knew my real name—John said, “Okay Cyrill, show us what you’ve got!” So I got up and sang a version of [Gershwin’s] “Summertime,” the Porgy & Bess number.
Some time afterward I was at the Majestic Ballroom in Birkenhead, and Brian Epstein came up to me and said, “I’ve never heard you sing, I want you to sing with the boys tonight.” So I sang “Summertime” again, with the Beatles playing behind me, but I was terribly, terribly nervous, and Brian was not at all impressed, and I thought, well okay, that’s that, I’ll just be singing around the clubs in Liverpool.
A few months later I was singing in a club called the Blue Angel and after I finished my set Brian came up to me and said, “Why didn’t you sing like that at the Majestic Ballroom?” I had no idea he was even in the club that night, but he loved what he heard and asked to manage me right then. I later asked Ringo if he had asked Brian to give me another listen, because Ringo and I were friends, but he just looked at me and said, “It wasn’t me, it was John.” I thank him to this day, because but for John, Brian never would have given me a second shot after that awful first audition. It truly changed my life.
He did stuff like that, which you’d think was totally out of character for him, because he liked to put on this angry young man front, you know, a man’s man, aloof, but behind that was a very warmhearted guy, and really quite shy, and with an acid sense of humor. I remember I did a big TV special, called “Around the Beatles.” I sang a song John and Paul had given me, “Love of the Loved,” while standing at the top of a flight of steps and wearing a very short miniskirt. Sitting at the bottom of the steps were the Beatles, and afterward, during the applause, John whispered mischievously in my ear, “I could see tomorrow’s washing,” meaning he could see my underthings, of course, and normally I’d have been mortified, but there I was on TV, so I just laughed. He was always trying to throw you like that.” - Cilla Black, Memories of John Lennon 

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The Beatles, Liverpool, September 1962; and Tittenhurst Park, 22 August 1969.

Photos © Les Chadwick; Ethan Russell

“There was a close bond between us through all those years.

The Beatles can’t ever really split up, because as we said at the time we did split up, it doesn’t really make any difference. The music is there, the films are all there. Whatever we did is still there and always will be. What is there is there - it wasn’t that important. It’s like Henry VIII or Hitler or any of these historical figures they’re always going to be showing documentaries about: their name will be written about forever and no doubt The Beatles’ will be too. But my life didn’t begin with The Beatles and it didn’t end with The Beatles. It was just like going to school. I went to Dovedale, then I went to Liverpool Institute and then I went to The Beatles University for a bit and then I got out of university and now I’m having the rest of my life off.

The bottom line is, as John said, it was only a little rock ‘n’ roll band. It did a lot and it meant a lot to a lot of people but, you know, it didn’t really matter that much.” - George Harrison, The Beatles Anthology

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The Beatles with their Mother-in-Laws (and then some)

Top: John Lennon with Lilian Powell and Isako Ono
Middle: Ringo Starr with Florence Cox and Marjorie Goldbach (Barbara Bach, Howard Goldbach)
Bottom: George Harrison with Diane Boyd (Pattie Boyd, Harold & Louise Harrison) and Mary Louise Arias (Olivia Harrison, Zeke Arias)

Paul McCartney is missing because he never met any of his three mother-in-laws. They all died before he met and married his wives. Louise Eastman died in 1962, Beatrice Mills in 1989 and Arlene Shevell in 1991

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The Beatles onstage at the Cavern Club, Liverpool, 22 August 1962; and during their final photo session, Tittenhurst Park, 22 August 1969. Photo 1 screen captured from live footage (here); photo 2 © Ethan Russell.

“The Beatles can’t ever really split up, because as we said at the time we did split up, it doesn’t really make any difference. The music is there, the films are all there. Whatever we did is still there and always will be. What is there is there - it wasn’t that important. It’s like Henry VIII or Hitler or any of these historical figures they’re always going to be showing documentaries about: their name will be written about forever and no doubt The Beatles’ will be too. But my life didn’t begin with The Beatles and it didn’t end with The Beatles. It was just like going to school. I went to Dovedale, then I went to Liverpool Institute and then I went to The Beatles University for a bit and then I got out of university and now I’m having the rest of my life off.

The bottom line is, as John said, it was only a little rock ‘n’ roll band. It did a lot and it meant a lot to a lot of people but, you know, it didn’t really matter that much.” - George Harrison, The Beatles Anthology [x]

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A Russian fan recently asked Paul (via paulmccartney.com) 

“What was the biggest - or one of the biggest - fears in your life and how did you overcome it?”


Paul replied: 

“Biggest fears? When I was a kid it was just getting beaten up by a local gang. You know, that was a purely physical fear. Where I lived it was a hard estate and there were guys who if you saw them you would just go to the other side of the street. Because you knew they would just say, ‘Hey you, who you lookin’ at?’ And there was no right answer! 'You!’ And they’re coming at you! 'Not you!’ And they’re coming at you!”

[and]

“Performing, it was always the idea that the audience didn’t like you and you had to prove yourself. I think that’s why a lot of people get stage fright and get nervous. You think, 'Oh my god, I’m gonna be terrible, they hate me, and it’s all terrible.’

"And so I think that was one of the earliest fears. I remember nearly giving it all up when we were doing a concert in Wembley - which was a Poll-Winners concert - in the really early days of The Beatles. And I remember feeling physically sick with a knot in my stomach thinking, 'I should give this up, this is just too painful, what am I doing?’ I got over it.

"And as you can see I didn’t give it up! So that’s two different kinds of fears.”
[Paul, 2016]


Stage fright, Paul? Really?! The Beatle who least wanted to give up touring? Who wanted to tour during the Let It Be bit and who continues touring almost all the time now? 

Paul was also asked if he still suffers from stage fright. He said:


“Not too bad. What I do is I always say to my promoter when a tour is coming up: 'Put one show on sale and see how it goes.’

“And he’ll ring me back and say, 'It’s sold out! Twenty minutes!’ So I’ve got to assume that they like me.

"So it gives you a confidence and I think I can probably relax, they probably like me. And it means you can enjoy the show more.”
[Paul, 2016]


Above images are the Beatles playing the NME Poll Winners Party, 21st April, 1963, which may be the concert Paul’s referring to. The Beatles were second on the bill that night. They hadn’t actually won a poll, they were just there because their latest record had been hugely popular. They played four songs - Please, Please Me, From Me To You, Twist and Shout and Long Tall Sally - and stole the show. 

Story source: The Mirror, 30th Oct, 2016
Pics: Top pic - Beatles Source, Bottom pic - V&A Images

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Images from ‘The Beatles ‘68: Tom Murray’s Mad Day Out’ by Tom Murray, Paul Skellett and Simon Weitzman.


Paul knew I was somewhat outside the main throng of people there so he spent a lot of time looking out for where I was, because I was kind of the lone wolf.

However, my favourite picture is the portrait of George, which I think is stunning and sums him up. He really was the quiet Beatle. […]

George, for me, stood out.

I seemed to gravitate towards him and we started talking about the sitar, which is an instrument I’ve always loved. The he talked about filmmaking, a medium which fascinated him. Film was a great passion of mine as well, and indeed latterly, John Schlesinger told me I should have been a film director. But I fear it would have been too stressful. However, this didn’t deter George from pursuing his ambitions and he seemed to move effortlessly into that world.
[Tom Murray, The Beatles ‘68: Tom Murray’s Mad Day Out by Tom Murray, Paul Skellett and Simon Weitzman]


Pics: Top - ‘George’ by Tom Murray, bottom - ‘Scene from the Thames one’ by Tom Murray, middle - page from the book.

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The Beatles playing in a rainstorm in St Louis, 21st August 1966. 

After performing a previously postponed show in Cincinnati, the Beatles flew to St Louis, Missouri to perform one show at Busch stadium. Although a hastily erected cover to the stage provided some shelter, water still dripped on the amplifiers and stage, making electrocution a real possibility! This was the gig that finally convinced Paul they should quit touring. 

Pics:

(Top to bottom)

1. John playing in the rain (possibly one of my favourite Beatles photos ever!) 
2 - 4. The Beatles backstage at St Louis Busch Stadium. 
5 - 9. The Beatles playing in a rainstorm, 21st August 1966. 
10. Also the gig where Ringo wore that hat. 

(I got these images from various sources and I don’t know who the photographers are for any of them. If you do, let me know! Ta!) 

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TODAY IN BEATLES HISTORY - The Beatles along with their wives fly to Satzburg, Austria from London to film the wintry scenes seen in Help! Once there, they checked into the Hotel Edelweiss in Obertauern, Austria where the filming took place. A Press conference was held upon their arrival. A funny snippet from it comes from John,

REPORTER: ‘What do you know about Mozart?’

JOHN: “Mozart  Wonderful How is he.?”

Bottom Photo Credit - Christian Skrein.

The Fab Bums: Songs to listen to when thinking about the beatles butts

1. Oh Yeah//Yello 2. Shake Your Hips//The Rolling Stones 3. (Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty//KC & The Sunshine Band 4. Lord of the Thighs//Aerosmith 5. Fat Bottomed Girls//Queen 6. Pour Some Sugar on Me//Def Leppard 6. Brick House//The Commodores 7.Dance (A$$) Remix//Big Sean Feat. Nicki Minaj

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