joey mogul

While quick to adopt the more mainstream “equality” rhetoric of the civil rights movement, the LGBT movement has also embraced, or at least not explicitly challenged, the themes of “law and order” and “getting tough on crime.” These themes not only undermine the very meaning of racial justice and civil rights but also ensure the continuing abandonment of entire segments of communities of colour to the criminal legal system.
—  Queer Injustice:  The Criminalisation of LGBT People In the United States by Joey L. Mogul, Andrea J. Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock

The “bad apple” theory–the idea that a few rogue individuals are responsible for poisoning the barrel, and their identification and removal is the simple cure–cannot account for the historically pervasive, consistent, and persistent systemic violence that characterises the criminal legal system. The barrel itself is rotten–that is to say, foundationally and systemically violent and unjust.

Ultimately, regardless of our intentions, all of us are accountable for the roles we play in reinforcing or dismantling the violence endemic to policing and punishment systems.

—  Queer Injustice:  The Criminalisation of LGBT People In the United States by Joey L. Mogul, Andrea J. Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock
Queer engagement with law enforcement cannot be accurately described, much less analysed, as a stand-alone, generic “gay” experience because race, class, and gender are crucial factors in determining how and which queers will bear the brunt of violence at the hands of the criminal legal system.
—  Queer Injustice:  The Criminalisation of LGBT People In the United States by Joey L. Mogul, Andrea J. Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock
Unfortunately, [police violence is] not solely the product of…officers acting alone, based on their personal prejudices. The problem of police misconduct is both systemic and commonplace. It has never been limited to rogue officers and a few “bad applies.” While individual officers may or may not harbor individual prejudices against LGBT people, they are part of hierarchical institutions, and are expected to fit in with law enforcement culture. In many cases, law enforcement agents are trained to act on racialized presumptions of deviance and criminality. They then engage in institutionalized surveillance and control of communities deemed dangerous, through a variety of practices ranging from profiling and selective law enforcement to saturation of particular areas with street patrols to deployment of targeted squads and task forces–such as the vice squad–charged with policing particular communities.
—  Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock, “The Ghosts of Stonewall: Policing Gender, Policing Sex,” Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States, pg.50-1