joaquinings

Here’s me post cry because I’m drunk and Joaquin suggested my cousin and I cosplay Mabel and dipper and I lost my shit bc I haven’t hung out w him in so long and we would be really cute

every time i see the name joaquin i pronounce it in my head as like “joe a kin” and right after i do that i go “god damn it it’s wa keen i do this every single time”

thats my story

tevlek replied to your post “tevlek replied to your post “Another Book of Life Thought Xibalba and…”

Yeah, a lot had to be left out to make the movie more for Manolo. If there were sequels, they were supposed to be focused on Joaquin and then the third to be about Maria.

That brings up another problem for me.

Joaquin and Manolo both got a lot of character development even though it’s mainly Manolo’s film. And yet Maria gets the standard Strong Female Character treatment and doesn’t really seem to grow in any particular way.

Manolo learned to be himself and follow his dreams.

Joaquin leaned to be a true, selfless hero.

Maria … leaned Kung Fu at some point?

6

Everyone, meet a garrison of late Napoleonic-era Spanish soldiers. It took quite a bit of time and research on Napoleonic era Spain and its military to get the soldiers to look right. I used Assassim’s Creed CreationsRule Britannia set and played around with the colors to get as close to the appearance of Napoleonic Spanish uniforms as I can with the game.

Sometime in 1800s a garrison of soldiers was routinely sent to occupy the province of Nombre de Jesus in the Spanish Indies. The Spanish soldiers were led by Captain Gutierrez, whose second-in-command is Lieutenant Alicante.

Six of the garrison’s soldiers are stationed close to a barracks close to the fort, under the direct command of Capt. Gutierrez himself and tasked to protect the island’s Spanish governor and the interests of the Church. Somehow, with the rest of the soldiers spread thinly across the province, which may eventually need a gendarmerie of its own in the future to keep the peace.


The Book of Life - Animal Symbols + Mexican Culture

Unfortunately, Manolo is not included, as I was not able to locate the proper GIF of him for the post.

María Posada - Mexican Creole Hairless Pig

In the film, María is always accompanied by her pet pig, Chuy. The pig was a symbol of virility, strength, and fertility in ancient Chinese cultures. The boar is even among the animals in the Chinese zodiac where it is considered a symbol of sincerity, honesty, and determination. 

The Mexican Creole hairless pig is a unique genotype that is believed to have been introduced to Mexico during the Spanish conquest. 

In Mexico, swets known as “piggy cookies” in English, and “little pigs” in Spanish, are known by many names — cerditos, cochinitos, marranitos or puerquitos. Sweetened with unprocessed cane sugar and honey, and spiced with cinnamon, the cutout cookies puff when you bake them. Mexico-born chef Pati Jinich describes the cookies as a cross between a cookie and a sweet roll, and as “breads, little fluffy breads”.

“They just taste so sweet, in a mellow way, and comforting because they’re so puffy and fluffy and like nothing I ever tasted before,” she says. “But at the same time, it tasted to me like my home country.”

After visiting a gas station in Mexico City, where the sweets were being sold, Jinich started noticing the cookies everywhere — not in big cities, but small towns. Still, she couldn’t find a recipe. “Everybody cooks by eye; you add a little, you mix a little,” she says.

“Piggy cookies” are just one among many pan dulce recipes. Pan dulce (lit. “sweet bread”) is one of the poster treats in Mexico and other Latin American countries. One of the first non-native foods that was introduced to Mexico by Spain was wheat, a Spanish religious necessity. 

The creation of sweet bread was influenced by the French and Spaniards, who were the ones that introduced baked goods such as crispy rolls, baguettes, and sweet pastries to Mexico. This inspired the indigenous peoples to create different types of pan dulces such as besos, conchas, and cuernos amongst others. The bread is considered to be one of Mexico’s most inexpensive treats, and is consumed daily as breakfast or late supper, known as merienda.

Joaquín Mondragon - Criollo Horse

For Joaquín, he shares a close companionship with his gray horse, Plata. The horse symbolizes power, grace, beauty, nobility, strength, and freedom. Due to its natural companionship with man in both work and art, the Horse easily wins a special seat in history, ranking high marks of honor, reverence and symbolism. Serving man in war, mobility, productivity, agriculture, development of all kinds, the Horse is by far one of the largest contributor to the enhancement of civilization.

The Criollo horse is a breed that originated in Brazil, and later spread to Mexico. It may have the best endurance of any horse breed in the world, next to the Arabian. The hardy Criollos were descendants of Spanish stock introduced by Spanish colonists. The breed dates back to a 1535, shipment of 100 Andalusian (PRE) stallions coming from Cadiz, Spain, to the Rio de la Plata. During the Revolution, many of these horses were killed, and breeding had all but stopped, resulting in near extinction of the Mexican Criollo horse.

Since their arrival aboard Spanish ships, horses have been part of the story of the New World. In Mexico, there is perhaps no better representative of the country’s combined cultures and history than the horse trained for “charreria,” the Mexican version of a rodeo.

Horses competing in this embellished display of skills once necessary to ranch life, must be agile, well-tempered and intelligent — able to execute the commands of their charros, the horsemen whose traditional riding suits and wide-brimmed sombreros are part of the cultural iconography. For the charro, his horse is as inseparable from himself as it is from the history of Mexico. "We were conquered by horses, we gained our independence with horses, we made our Revolution with horses and we continue to love horses,“ said charro Daniel Flores Yeverino.

La Muerte - Monarch Butterfly

This butterfly is symbolic of lightness of being and elevation from the heaviness of tensions. This animal represents those who invite joy and bliss into their lives. Butterflies often have bright colors, and by extension, they are associated with life and brightness. The message of this animal is to lighten up, and add more color to your life. Those with a butterfly as a personal symbol often have a “colorful personality”.

In many traditions around the world, the butterfly is a symbol of the soul or soul world. For example, in Chinese symbology, it can represent immortality. For the Japanese, a white butterfly symbolizes the soul the departed ones. In Ancient Greece, butterflies represent the psyche or soul, and its attribute of immortality.

The Monarch butterflies arrive in Mexico each year in late-October. Their arrival coincides with Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead); one of Mexico’s most important holidays. During the annual Day of the Dead holiday, deceased relatives are believed to return home where they’re honored with feasts, celebrations and elaborate ofrendas (offerings). According to local legend, the Monarch butterflies arriving in Mexico at this time of the year are believed to be the souls of the deceased returning to earth.

Xibalba - Viper Snake

The snake represents wisdom, healing, elusiveness, manipulation of lightning, transformation or shapeshifting, exploration of the mysteries of life, primitive or elemental energy, protection from religious persecution, creative power, immortality, and the afterlife. 

On the deepest level, the snake’s skin shedding symbolizes death and rebirth, an idea which is depicted by the image of a snake swallowing its own tail - a symbol of eternity. The Snakes medicine is not to be treated lightly. Its meaning touches on the deepest mysteries in life. If you are ready to shed your own skin, Snake is ready and waiting to guide you through the spiral path of transformation. On a material level snake is vitality, on an emotional level ambition and dreams, on a mental level intellect and power, and on the highest level, the spiritual level wisdom, understanding and wholeness.

To the Mexicas, the snake represented wisdom, and it had strong connotations with the”feathered serpent” god, Quetzalcoatl. At its simplest, the symbolism of snake-and-skull in Mexican mythology is a timeless message of impermanence. The symbolism of the snake or rattlesnake is another extension of the unique Mexican perspective on life, death and the transition between the two.

Mexican mythology indicates the snake is a symbol of veneration, worship and honor. Often a symbol of great power, resurrection and rebirth, the snake continues to be a powerful emblem of renewal and transition. The snake is also recognized as a symbol of humanity as a whole. Interestingly, the Mexican perspective provides hope for mankind to aspire to great heights as it correlates the shedding of the serpent’s skin, to man’s ability to change his own circumstances and overcome adversity.