jitneys

2

BEFORE ‘MOONLIGHT’ & ‘THE WALKING DEAD,’ A FRIENDSHIP BORN IN THE CLASSROOM

ANDRÉ HOLLAND: After seeing [her] monologue at N.Y.U., I basically followed Danai around for the whole semester.
DANAI GURIRA: It was very obvious.
HOLLAND: I was a first-year student. You were a big-deal third-year.

HOLLAND: I talk to Danai more than anyone in terms of work. All these plays I’ve done — Danai came to see “Jitney” recently, and she is the only person I talk to about the work. She had a couple good ideas. I’m working hard to put them in. I’ll keep the specifics to myself. [laughter]
GURIRA: A lot of it is about decision-making in our careers. We remind each other of who we are, what we want, where we want to go. We can get caught up in the moment of the thing you are working on. We remind each other of what we said last year, or five years ago, about what we wanted in life.
HOLLAND: We’re working on a screenplay now together. It’s based on the book “A Native of Nowhere,” and it’s a fascinating story about one man’s life.

important!

do not bash the shows that won tonys. if they won, they won. the shows or actors who won won because they deserved it.

performers work so hard and all the people who are involved work so hard! if you were nominated, that’s already so much to be proud of.

shows like ‘hello, dolly!’ are getting bashed so much! please stop being so negative just because falsettos didn’t win. 'hello, dolly!’ won best revival because it’s a good show. bette midler won because she’s a wonderful actress.

by saying musical x/play x was robbed, you’re implying the other shows don’t deserve it and are worse!

maybe just like the actors who didn’t win, you reading this, don’t make a big deal out of it and say they were robbed, maybe you applaud and congratulate the winners. and respect the performers. like you should.

you’re putting down and disrespecting art that has taken so much work and calling it 'fucking terrible’ and 'ruins everything’! no! not okay!

you don’t have to love the musical. maybe you wanted some other musicals to win. but you sure don’t see me being a dick about other musicals winning over my choice. don’t knock down shows you haven’t even listened to or know what they’re about just because you wanted other ones to win.

the outcome that people were predicting was one show should win everything! but the awards were spread around! more people’s accomplishments were acknowledged! that’s better because they all deserve it because so much work has been put into the shows!

no one was robbed, snubbed, etc.

2

One of the interesting things about growing up in Miami is that you see a lot of film and television productions. I remember seeing a Harrier jet in the middle of the street near my father’s office because True Lies was being shot there. Scenes from The Crew and episodes of Burn Notice were shot a few blocks from my childhood apartment. The causeway by my high school was shut down because they needed to shoot, of all things, the music video for Sisqo’s “Thong Song”. And these were just the productions that I personally encountered, there were tons more that I won’t bother naming. Yet in all these years of seeing my hometown on big and small screens, there wasn’t a single one of them that told a real Miami story about real Miami people from real Miami communities. Everything was some kind of cheap music video, some capitalist nouveau riche fantasy, some tropical bikini fantasy for white people. You never hear about the immigrants from all over Latin America and the world hustling in warehouses, flipping merchandise, laying marble tiles, praying in strip-mall churches. You never hear about how the City let public housing be cannibalized by fancy contractors so that they could build private residences to push subprime mortgages with. And you sure as hell don’t hear about the black and brown people living in Liberty City, much less about those that are queer. But that is what makes Moonlight a film of rare power, in that it renders, in masterful strokes of black and blue, a story that was once invisible. Personally, the film resonated deeply with me, even though my young life in Miami was different from Chiron and Kevin’s. For the first time in my 30+ years, I saw fragments of familiar experiences (riding sad in a sad metromover, smoking a blunt on South Beach at night, jokes about jitneys, black beans from Cuban diners) in a film of staggering beauty, written and directed by fellow Miamians working with a Miami crew. And holy shit, it was the best film of the year. <3 [Edit: It actually fucking won best picture]

5

The set of the August Wilson play “Jitney” brings Pittsburgh to life vibrantly [X]

“If the gypsy-cab drivers who work out of the storefront office at 2046 Wylie Avenue are hungry, they can fill up on prime rib at the Red Bull Inn. The Super 71 drive-in is a hot spot for the latest disaster movie. For something more racy, there’s the L’amoure Theater (“It’s Better Than Burlesque”). And of course a Pirates game and an Iron City beer make for a perfectly Pittsburgh pairing.

That, at least, is how the created world of August Wilson’s “Jitney,” now on Broadway, looks through the eyes of its set designer, David Gallo. The 1982 play, running through March 12 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater, takes place in 1977 inside a car-service dispatch in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, the vibrant but troubled black neighborhood where most of Mr. Wilson’s plays are set. (“Jitney,” directed by Ruben Santiago-Hudson, is the last of Wilson’s 10-play cycle about African-American lives in the 20th century to make it to Broadway.) It’s a run-down place where the drivers sit on a worn couch to gossip and wait for fares, and where family demons between the company’s owner and his ex-con son come out to play.”

The Tony Awards 2017

Musical: Dear Evan Hansen

Play: “Oslo

Musical revival:Hello, Dolly!

Play revival:Jitney

Leading actor, play: Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter”

Leading actress, play: Laurie Metcalf, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Featured actor, play: Michael Aronov, “Oslo”

Featured actress, play: Cynthia Nixon, “The Little Foxes”

Featured actor, musical: Gavin Creel, “Hello, Dolly!”

Featured actress, musical: Rachel Bay Jones, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Book, musical: “Dear Evan Hansen,” Steven Levenson

Original score: “Dear Evan Hansen,” music and lyrics, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul

Scenic design, play: Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong”

Scenic design, musical: Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Costume design, play: Jane Greenwood, “The Little Foxes”

Costume design, musical: Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!”

Lighting design, play: Christopher Akerlind, “Indecent”

Lighting design, musical: Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Direction, play: Rebecca Taichman, “Indecent”

Direction, musical: Christopher Ashley, “Come From Away”

Choreography: Andy Blankenbuehler, “Bandstand”

Orchestrations: Alex Lacamoire, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Special Tony Award for lifetime achievement in the theater: James Earl Jones

Special Tony Award: Gareth Fry and Pete Malkin, sound designers for “The Encounter”

Regional Theater Tony Award: Dallas Theater Center, Dallas

Isabelle Stevenson Tony Award: Baayork Lee

Tony Honors for excellence in the theater: Nina Lannan, Alan Wasse

(Courtesy of NY Times)

2017 Tony Award Nominations

Best Play:
A Doll’s House, Part 2
Indecent
Oslo
Sweat

Best Musical:
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen
Groundhog Day The Musical
Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812

Best Revival of a Play:
August Wilson’s Jitney
Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes
Present Laughter
Six Degrees of Separation

Best Revival of a Musical:
Falsettos
Hello, Dolly!
Miss Saigon

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play:
Denis Arndt (Heisenberg)
Chris Cooper (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Corey Hawkins (Six Degrees of Separation)
Kevin Kline (Present Laughter)
Jefferson Mays (Oslo)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play:
Cate Blanchett (The Present)
Jennifer Ehle (Oslo)
Sally Field (The Glass Menagerie)
Laura Linney (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Laurie Metcalf (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical:
Christian Borle (Falsettos)
Josh Groban (Great Comet)
Andy Karl (Groundhog Day)
David Hyde Pierce (Hello, Dolly!)
Ben Platt (Dear Evan Hansen)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical:
Denée Benton (Great Comet)
Christine Ebersole (War Paint)
Patti LuPone (War Paint)
Bette Midler (Hello, Dolly!)
Eva Noblezada (Miss Saigon)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play:
Michael Aronov (Oslo)
Danny DeVito (Arthur Miller’s The Price)
Nathan Lane (The Front Page)
Richard Thomas (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
John Douglas Thomas (August Wilson’s Jitney)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play:
Johanna Day (Sweat)
Jayne Houdyshell (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Cynthia Nixon (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Condola Rashad (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Michelle Wilson (Sweat)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical:
Gavin Creel (Hello, Dolly!)
Mike Faist (Dear Evan Hansen)
Andrew Rannells (Falsettos)
Lucas Steele (Great Comet)
Brandon Uranowitz (Falsettos)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical:
Kate Baldwin (Hello, Dolly!)
Stephanie J. Block (Falsettos)
Jenn Colella (Come From Away)
Rachel Bay Jones (Dear Evan Hansen)
Mary Beth Peil (Anastasia)

Best Book of a Musical:
Irene Sankoff and David Hein (Come From Away)
Steven Levenson (Dear Evan Hansen)
Danny Rubin (Groundhog Day)
Dave Malloy (Great Comet)

Best Original Score Written For the Theatre:
Come From Away - Sankoff and Hein
Dear Evan Hansen - Pasek and Paul
Groundhog Day - Tim Minchin
Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 - Dave Malloy

Best Scenic Design of a Play:
David Gallo (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Nigel Hook (The Play That Goes Wrong)
Douglas W. Schmidt (The Front Page)
Michael Yeargan (Oslo)

Best Scenic Design of a Musical:
Rob Howell (Groundhog Day)
David Korins (War Paint)
Mimi Lien (Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812)
Santo Loquasto (Hello, Dolly!)

Best Costume Design of a Play:
Jane Greenwood (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Susan Hilferty (Present Laughter)
Toni-Leslie James (August Wilson’s Jitney)
David Zinn (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Costume Design of a Musical:
Linda Cho (Anastasia)
Santo Loquasto (Hello, Dolly!)
Paloma Young (Great Comet)
Catherine Zuber (War Paint)

Best Lighting Design of a Play:
Christopher Akerlind (Indecent)
Jane Cox (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Donald Holder (Oslo)
Jennifer Tipton (A Doll’s House, Part 2)

Best Lighting Design of a Musical:
Howell Binkley (Come From Away)
Natasha Katz (Hello, Dolly!)
Bradley King (Great Comet)
Japhy Weideman (Dear Evan Hansen)

Best Direction of a Play:
Sam Gold (A Doll’s House, Part 2)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (August Wilson’s Jitney)
Bartlett Sher (Oslo)
Daniel Sullivan (Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes)
Rebecca Taichman (Indecent)

Best Direction of a Musical:
Christopher Ashley (Come From Away)
Rachel Chavkin (Great Comet)
Michael Greif (Dear Evan Hansen)
Matthew Warchus (Groundhog Day)
Jerry Zaks (Hello, Dolly!)

Best Choreography:
Andy Blankenbuehler (Bandstand)
Peter Darling and Ellen Kane (Groundhog Day)
Kelly Devine (Come From Away)
Denis Jones (Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical)
Sam Pinkleton (Great Comet)

Best Orchestrations:
Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen (Bandstand)
Larry Hochman (Hello, Dolly!)
Alex Lacamoire (Dear Evan Hansen)
Dave Malloy (Great Comet)

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in Theatre:
James Earl Jones

9

“Jitney” by August Wilson

Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 2016

Starring Harvy Blanks, Anthony Chisholm, Brandon J. Dirden, Andre Holland, Carra Patterson, Michael Potts, Keith Randolph Smith, Ray Anthony Thomas & John Douglas Thompson

everyone during bette midler’s speech at the tonys:

2017 Tony Awards: The Complete Winners List

Who won big at the 71st Annual Tony Awards?

Kevin Spacey hosted the 2017 Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York City on Sunday, with plenty of big stars in attendance, including Josh Groban, Sarah Paulson, Cobie Smulders, Orlando Bloom, Nick Kroll and Taye Diggs.

Check out all the big winners below!

PICS: The 2017 Tony Awards Red Carpet Arrivals!

Best Play

“A Doll’s House, Part 2”
“Indecent”
“Oslo” *WINNER*
“Sweat”

Best Musical

“Come From Away”
“Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical”
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”

Best Book of a Musical

“Come From Away”  – Irene Sankoff and David Hein
“Dear Evan Hansen” – Steven Levenson *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical” – Danny Rubin
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” – Dave Malloy

Best Original Score

“Come From Away” – Music & Lyrics: Irene Sankoff and David Hein
“Dear Evan Hansen” – Music & Lyrics: Benj Pasek & Justin Paul *WINNER*
“Groundhog Day The Musical” – Music & Lyrics: Tim Minchin
“Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” – Music & Lyrics: Dave Malloy

Best Revival of a Play

“August Wilson’s Jitney” *WINNER*
“Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
“Present Laughter”
“Six Degrees of Separation”

Best Revival of a Musical

“Falsettos”
“Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
“Miss Saigon”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Denis Arndt, “Heisenberg”
Chris Cooper, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Corey Hawkins, “Six Degrees of Separation”
Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter” *WINNER*
Jefferson Mays, “Oslo”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Cate Blanchett, “The Present”
Jennifer Ehle, “Oslo”
Sally Field, “The Glass Menagerie”
Laura Linney, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Laurie Metcalf, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Christian Borle, “Falsettos”
Josh Groban, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Andy Karl, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
David Hyde Pierce, “Hello, Dolly!”
Ben Platt, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Denee Benton, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Christine Ebersole, “War Paint”
Patti LuPone, “War Paint”
Bette Midler, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Eva Noblezada, “Miss Saigon”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Michael Aronov, “Oslo” *WINNER*
Danny DeVito, “Arthur Miller’s The Price”
Nathan Lane, “The Front Page”
Richard Thomas, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
John Douglas Thompson, “August Wilson’s Jitney”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Johanna Day, “Sweat”
Jayne Houdyshell, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Cynthia Nixon, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” *WINNER*
Condola Rashad, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Michelle Wilson, “Sweat”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Gavin Creel, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Mike Faist, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Andrew Rannells, “Falsettos”
Lucas Steele, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Brandon Uranowitz, “Falsettos”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Kate Baldwin, “Hello, Dolly!”
Stephanie J. Block, “Falsettos”
Jenn Colella, “Come From Away”
Rachel Bay Jones, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
Mary Beth Peil, “Anastasia”

Best Scenic Design of a Play

David Gallo, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong” *WINNER*
Douglas W. Schmidt, “The Front Page”
Michael Yeargan, “Oslo”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Rob Howell, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
David Korins, “War Paint”
Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812” *WINNER*
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!”

Best Costume Design of a Play

Jane Greenwood, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” *WINNER*
Susan Hilferty, “Present Laughter”
Toni-Leslie James, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
David Zinn, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Linda Cho, “Anastasia”
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!” *WINNER*
Paloma Young, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Catherine Zuber, “War Paint”

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Christopher Akerlind, “Indecent”
Jane Cox, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Donald Holder, “Oslo”
Jennifer Tipton, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Howell Binkley, “Come From Away”
Natasha Katz, “Hello, Dolly!”
Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Japhy Weideman, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Best Direction of a Play

Sam Gold, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Bartlett Sher, “Oslo”
Daniel Sullivan, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Rebecca Taichman, “Indecent” *WINNER*

Best Direction of a Musical

Christopher Ashley, “Come From Away” *WINNER*
Rachel Chavkin, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”
Michael Greif, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Matthew Warchus, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
Jerry Zaks, “Hello, Dolly!”

Best Choreography

Andy Blankenbuehler, “Bandstand” *WINNER*
Peter Darling and Ellen Kane, “Groundhog Day The Musical”
Kelly Devine, “Come From Away”
Denis Jones, “Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical”
Sam Pinkleton, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”

Best Orchestrations

Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen, “Bandstand”
Larry Hochman, “Hello, Dolly!”
Alex Lacamoire, “Dear Evan Hansen” *WINNER*
Dave Malloy, “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812”