jewish symbols

characters like magneto, like wanda and pietro, who’s jewishness is so integral to who they are as characters, being stripped of it and not only that but being portrayed as nazis and as willing participants in nazi regimes is such a huge slap in the face like y’all it fucking hurts

also the fact that joss whedon thinks jews could “volunteer” as wanda and pietro supposedly did in his mind when jews were literally forcefully objected to experimentation, mutilation, and sterilization among the many other horrors of the nazi regime

that nick spencer thinks it’s subversive to make characters like captain america, created by jewish men as a symbol of hope, and magneto, a literal fucking holocaust survivor, faces of a nazi organization when since january alone there have been over 80 bomb threats against jewish centers and nazis are still out here doing their shit today

like this isn’t good writing, it’s not groundbreaking or new or fresh, it’s rehashing the antisemitism we see everywhere all the time and it’s fucking gross

The Left: No Muslim should be blamed, held accountable, or be forced to apologize for Daesh, Al Queda or any other terrorist group

Me: Hell yeah! Totally with y'all!

Also The Left: All Jews must instantly and vocally denounce Israel every 3.26 seconds or they are secret Mossad Cointelpro Zionists and none of those icky Jewish symbols at our marches because all Judaism Zionism makes us uncomfortable

Me:

I just found out that the dumbass Chicago Dyke March crew apparently kicked people out for flying a pride flag with the star of David on it because they are so ignorant and uneducated and unwilling to hold conversation that they didn’t realize it’s a symbol for Jewish people broadly, not the fucking official symbol for just Israel and Zionists. So fuck dykes, butches, and Jewish people showing pride in their being LGBT and Jewish I guess? What a horrible group of organizers.

if you think women and poc in comics are “forced” or “SJW shit”, then you completely missed the point of pretty much all of your beloved characters and what they have fought for since comics were a thing. 

a few people seriously unfollowed me for saying i won’t forfeit a thousand year old jewish symbol to a sixty-nine year old nation-state lmao you’ve gotta be fucking kidding me

antisemitism being glossed over and disguised as necessary action in “radical womens spaces” is nothing new no matter how much fresh packaging these shiksas put it in, it’s well documented since the very birth of american feminist and lesbian/bi movements and has been stinking up the place ever since. kicking Jewish lesbians out of pride marches based on speculated Zionism just for flying an ancient & universal Jewish religious symbol on flags will do nothing to free Palestine. it’ll instead fuel the fire that keeps many Jewish activists scared and distrustful to join pro Palestinian causes because of the antisemitism they receive from (most often non-Palestinian) organizers. get your shit together.

Stop saying Israel “appropriated” the Magen David as an argument for banning Jewish symbols at your events. First of all, that’s not what appropriation means. Jewish people can’t “appropriate” their own symbols. That would be like me saying the Muslim populace of Pakistan “appropriated” the Crescent and Star of Islam because I come from an anti-partition Indian family. Second of all, I don’t give a flying fuck what some country I’ve never lived in has on its flag, that’s my religious symbol and you don’t get to fucking define what it means for me. ISIS uses Arabic on its flag and I don’t go around telling my friends from Egypt and Saudi that they can’t speak their native language because it’s been “appropriated” by terrorists.

I swear to G-d I think some of y'all just want to make things as bad as possible for Jews so that we all flee to Israel, thus making us Zionists it’s ok for you to hate and eliminate. Never mind that that would be a disaster for everybody in the region, especially Palestinians. Stop and think long and hard about what your actual goals are here and what you want to achieve before wading into the deep-end of the anti-Semitism pool.

it’s very telling to me that, in all the news and commentary i’ve read about the Chicago D*ke March’s expulsion of Jewish marchers, the most nuanced and considerate opinions i’ve heard have primarily come from Jews. Jews have been doing the soul-searching, Jews have been debating each other about the true meaning of the event, Jews have been asking each other about what Zionism means and how it interferes with others, and depressingly, Jews have been asking each other how to exist in public spaces wearing Jewish symbols without infringing on anyone else’s feelings. actually, to be fair, i’ve only seen a single Palestinian comment on the event so far, but their statement was complex and nuanced. meanwhile, many other American goyim, non-Muslim and non-Jewish, are promoting an extremely black-and-white view, where you’re either anti-everything-about-Israel or you’re a “””Zionist””” monster. but that’s not how countries work!

many Jews have complicated feelings about Israel, and condemn the violence toward innocent Palestinians while still supporting the general existence of a Jewish nation. some of these Jews call themselves Zionists, some do not. but all the goyim i’ve seen speaking about Israel in light of this event assume that to be Zionist is to support the Israeli government in all its actions. i wish everyone would stop using the language of “pro-Israel/Zionist” and “pro-Palestine/antiZionist” to refer to the debate–there should be no such thing as “pro-Israel” in the same way there is no such thing as “pro-France” or “pro-Nigeria” or “pro-Brazil”. using the term “pro-Israel” paints the poisonously false picture that if you are glad that a Jewish state exists at ALL, you automatically agree with the government. for every other nation around the world, people generally accept that you can disagree with the actions of the nation’s government without wanting that nation to be disintegrated. 

we’ve been talking a lot about how kicking Jews out of the march for carrying a flag with a Jewish star on it is antisemitic, but it’s eclipsed an even more fundamental conversation about how, alone of all the nations, people are not supposed to have a nuanced view of Israel’s actions separate from its existence. 

my point is twofold: if i were a Protestant, you would not ask me if i’m “pro-Germany” or “pro-England”. i am an American Jew. don’t ask me if i’m “pro-Israel” or “Zionist”. 1) it’s antisemitic to single out Jews for that kind of question, and 2) “pro-Israel” is a “gotcha” that doesn’t mean a goddamn thing. have more respect for the ability of Jews to hold nuanced, complex opinions. it’s basically our entire culture. believe me, if you want internal debate and soul-searching, the Jews have got you covered.

hey, so this is a genuine question being asked in good faith, and i’m just posting it here bc i have no idea where i would direct it. 

basically i recently heard it implied that jews shouldn’t wear magen davids, like as jewelry or w/e, bc it would be triggering/seen as threatening to palestinians. i am pro palestinian and know that i absolutely have a lot of work to do re: intersectionality in that area. but i can’t get past the idea that it is fundamentally antisemitic to police jewish symbols and automatically associate them with israel… does anyone have any experience or input on this?

Words by Hiba Krisht. Hiba is Lebanese and Palestinian, as well as a scholar and brilliant writer, so when she talks about Palestinian welfare and discourse about Palestine, everyone should listen.

“I’m at the point where I can’t see how focus on the Israel Palestine question re: Chicago Dyke March is anything other than derailment.
I’d also like to say that perception that pro-Palestine sentiment here is being silenced *as a general trend* very much does not sit well with me because I believe the silencing to be happening the other way around, and think this is in fact a longstanding destructive feature of discourse surrounding the Palestinian cause. Also, I believe most of those engaging in defense of a pro-Palestinian liberation stance right now mean well but do not understand how much its framing decenters actual Palestinian welfare.

I will elaborate on both counts. I’m agitated from all sides about this and I can’t do brevity so bear with me I guess.

First, the derailment. It’s of particularly troubling sort because it falls into a larger pattern of whataboutism where what *should be* a case of clearcut antisemitism cannot ever be identified and unilaterally condemned by the left without also being hashed and rehashed in exculpatory ways "because Israel.”

This is ESPECIALLY troubling when:
- There is a persistent phenomenon that’s almost like a lefty inversion of the concept Israeli exceptionalism. Like a reverse- exceptionalism, whereby discussion of Israel’s transgressions are held to singular standards of scrutiny to the exception of other nations/populations with comparable and/or far more deplorable histories and actions and crises. And in that I am including all the unspeakable injustice and destruction the larger MENA region has wrought to Palestinians, and how accountability seems no concern there, in part *because* of eternal return to obsessive, unilateral focus on Israel as the central Palestinian issue.

- Cases of anti Muslim bigotry aren’t held to the same scrutiny. The fact that people will demur about antisemitism but not anti-Muslim bigotry betrays a terrible lack of self awareness re: double standards. I mean, if you want to go ‘head and make weak arguments about how religious symbols are politically wielded, I’m going to have to start wondering why you aren’t referencing the much more appalling and deadly scope of human rights abuses committed under Muslim banners whenever the question of banning Muslim symbols comes up. Which would be a clearly terrible argument, but maybe it’s worth reflecting why the same argument suddenly makes sense when it comes to Jewish symbols.

- Casual antisemitism often manifests as (among other things) conflations between Jewish symbols or beliefs / various Zionist ones / various Israeli nationalist ones. We ALREADY know the Dyke March incident to be an iteration of this problem. Now think about how fucked up what happened next is: the ban of a Jewish symbol at a public event based on a bigoted conflation is called out as anti-Semitic. Then, as a kind of precondition for defense against or acknowledgement of such anti-Semitism, people on the left apparently see fit to hold Jewish people accountable, individually and as a group, for *the same bigoted conflations targeting them*, basically needing Jewish people to declare their politics and/or unilaterally renounce Zionism – essentially acting as gatekeepers despite being outsiders operating from apparently rather reductive and narrow presumptions of Zionist politics, since they somehow have the arrogance of assuming they understand and can judge what any given Jewish person’s Zionist adherence entails and means based on the label alone???
Who the fuck else does this? Who the fuck else has to go through this? Do we have to establish and approve of the political and ideological leanings of Muslims in order to defend them against anti-Muslim bigotry, or do we engage in whataboutism re: the scourge of political Islamism in the Middle East to determine if Muslims have the right to display their religious symbols in the west?

Now the Palestine thing. And necessary conversations. And silencing and whatnot.

Even points that are so reasonable and evident they may well be tautologies by now, like 'Palestinians are entitled to basic human rights’, bear a different weight when made in these contexts. They don’t exist in vacuum, but carry the shadow of a discourse that already has huge issues with privileging particularly anti-Zionist or anti-Israel Palestinian advocacy no matter how tangential to the conversation, and never mind what else is minimized and derailed in the process.

I am not doubting the sincerity and concern of my friends who are struggling to express pro-Palestine sentiment while being confused by hostility right now, but I would urge a more thorough consideration of the relative space taken up by the respective conversations thus far, and to not confuse long overdue push-back from folks who have every reason to be frustrated and sick of derailment and semantic squabbles over definitions of Zionism every time anti-semitism comes up.

If it seems like there is rejection from the left when you want to assert a pro-Palestinian stance here, it is less likely to be because people have a problem with pro-Palestinian politics as such, and more likely to be because there is a salient point regarding how cavalier antisemitism already is today and how these patterns of derailment every damn time end up gatekeeping attempts to counter an insidious kind of racism that can and must be discussed without forcing marginalized people to jump through the Israel Blame Game hoops to defend their humanity. The Israel Palestine thing needs to stop hijacking conversations about antisemitism. Palestinian welfare does not suffer if people refuse to derail conversations about anti-semitism, but conversations about anti-semitism certainly suffer when what-about-Palestine pops up.

And that’s all besides the fact that no matter how well-meaning, this Palestine-specific whataboutism does not contribute anything appreciable to Palestinian welfare and is so oblivious in some ways it’s kind of heartbreaking to try to navigate through. I firmly believe that the kneejerk way the Palestinian Cause is held up like a trump card whenever convenient and the infuriating reverse exceptionalism with which the conflict is treated has been a firm factor in prolonging the crisis and exacerbating Palestinian suffering. I’m struggling to find the words for why it troubles me so much to see all these conversations stuck on questions of whether anti Zionism is anti Semitism because don’t forget Israel and what about accountability for Palestine.

Please. Please. Please try to understand that an anti-Zionist pro-Palestine liberation stance is not one that needs championing in the left, that nobody fucking lets us forget Israel when we try to talk about Palestine, and nobody stops talking about Palestine when anyone mentions Israel, and it hasn’t done shit for diaspora or territory Palestinians except turn us into a handy slogan.
Establishing a stance of basic advocacy for the rights and welfare of the Palestinian people is not what the discourse lacks, it is what the discourse needs to *move past* already. Everybody is well-versed and comfortable with the Israel Blame Game– it drowns out and supersedes everything else, and it’s everything else that Palestinian advocacy desperately needs.

This is something that frustrates me to no end because it’s not reducible to something like Israeli conduct being dealt with disproportionate scrutiny in the left *as such*, but as a function of urgency and relative space. When Israel overshadows discourse about Palestinian welfare even though it is Arabs who are responsible for the most staggering and horrific ongoing Palestinian abuses, we have a problem. And it can never be talked about or addressed because only Israel’s actions are viewed with agency and significance, and attributing Palestinian suffering to anything else is instantly condemned as insidious detraction.

So you can see how it is frustrating to go through the whole 'is pro-palestinian anti-zionism anti-semitic’ rigmarole when it is so often a distraction from more functional questions of Palestinian welfare.

Fact: There are kinds of anti-Zionism that are pro-Palestinian rights and that are also anti-Semitic. Fact: There are kinds of anti-Zionism that are pro-Palestinian rights and that are not anti-Semitic. Fact: There are kinds of Zionism that are consistent with upholding the rights and freedoms of Palestinian Arabs, and, fact: there are kinds that are categorically not.

Educated opinion: Not only is anti-Zionism the established and normative stance across most of the Middle East, but, if we’re being honest, probably the most prevalent and established type of anti-Zionism in the discourse is that which engages in solid pro-Palestinian advocacy while also falling into both gross and casual anti-Semitism. This is definitely the case in the broader discourse on the issue in the Middle East, and what’s more, there is next to no self-awareness of the anti-Semitic assumptions, myths, and bigotries, not to mention the historical revisionism, threading popular and political anti-Zionism in the MENA region and popular Palestinian and Lebanese culture as well. This is a problem, and one that will never be addressed as long as pro-Palestinianism and anti-Semitism are presumed to be wholly non-overlapping binaries by well-meaning leftists. It is both possible and necessary to acknowledge and mount critique of anti-semitic elements in pro-Palestine discourse while maintaining Palestinian advocacy. Acknowledging anti-Semitism in the discourse is not going to undermine the Palestinian cause. Again, people don’t need to be perfect moral agents to justify a defense of their humanity.

Educated opinion: Leftist discourse centering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is overall entrenched in rigid, binary thinking and overwhelmingly leans pro-Palestine but in unfortunately too-basic, reductive ways. It already has an ideological rigidity problem. The discourse is such that to be pro-Palestine is to be above all transcendentally righteous: the lines of oppression and blame are clear and brook no further complexity; it is the cause no reasonable person can deny or fail to center in any conversation, and Palestinian advocacy is almost synonymous with condemnation for the Israeli crimes against the Palestinian people and aught else.

It is troubled with issues of allegiance and abstraction– maintaining certain principled stances re: the Cause is treated as an almost inviolable tenet for anybody who can claim to care about Palestine, despite the fact that the central narrative of the Cause pits the immediate welfare and prosperity of generations of living, breathing Palestinians against the memory of a Palestine that has not existed for decades and an abstract future promise of a right to return to a place that never again will be. The narrative may have once been in service of the people, but it has not been so in a long time. And it is only the narrative that is treated with sanctity by the most vocal champions of Palestine, and if it comes at the expense of Palestinian lives like in Yarmouk, so be it. Palestinian advocacy is more about condemning Israel than it is about supporting Palestine, and that is the problem.

It’s beginning to feel like despair, seeing how pro-Palestinian discourse is framed in terms of the questions of Zionism and anti-Zionism over and again, constantly centering and recentering the question of Palestinian welfare as a foil to Israeli aggression in broad nationalistic and/or existentialist terms, assuming unilateral causes, ascribing agency very selectively to regional actors, brooking no interrogation of Palestinian, Arab, or Muslim agency in the conflict, and obsessively resistant to moving past the past.

It’s been decades and Palestinians continue to suffer large-scale crises in basic resources, public health, trauma, and disenfranchisement, and they have largely been allowed to persist in the name *of* Palestine, at the hands of Arab regimes that shrug off all accountability in Israel’s direction, though for fifty years diaspora Palestinians in the larger Levant have been purely at the mercy of the Arab states housing them. We do not need to hear tired pro-liberation stances when it is those very stances that are used to justify keeping us holed up in Lebanese and Syrian refugee camps, stateless, in suspended animation, without civil rights or wealth or upwards mobility, dying slowly of poverty and deplorable living conditions and isolation if we’re lucky, and if we’re unlucky, until a guy like Assad comes along and murders, maims, starves, and makes refugees out of a whole city of us– and yet it is in the name of liberating Palestine that Assadist discourse proliferates, being anti-Israel, and Palestine’s catastrophe is only and ever subsumed into the crimes of Israel and not of those of Syria or Lebanon or Assad or Hamas or the PA or Fatah or the GCC states or anybody else.
When I want to talk about Palestinian advocacy, I want to talk about Assad and the nearly 200,000 Palestinians in Yarmouk camp that are now dead or gone or starving under siege and I want to talk about how the Lebanese state has made pariahs and a lost people out of *generations* of diaspora Palestinians practically quarantined in refugee camps because of petty sectarian concerns and I want to talk about the Palestinian political elite grievously frittering away resources and opportunities that could have prevented significant Palestinian suffering and death because of political feuds and a reckless privileging of a jihadi cause over popular welfare– but I cannot, because the justifications, distractions, conspiracy theories loop incessantly back to Israel. Which cements *my* concern that these conversations are not really *about* Palestinian welfare at all.“

First You Came for the Trans Women: An Open Letter to the Chicago Dyke March Collective

Core Members of the Chicago Dyke March Collective (CDMC),

I am a Jew. I am also the first trans woman to have been a member of your collective. I am writing in regards to your collective’s decision to ask three women carrying Jewish pride flags to leave the 2017 Chicago Dyke March.

My interest in questions regarding inclusion at the Chicago Dyke March goes at least as far back as 2009, the year when I became a core member of your collective. Almost immediately I became concerned when another core member violated a trans woman’s privacy in such a way that, had it happened to me, I would have considered it a violation of my sexual boundaries. In the backlash that ensued after I voiced my complaint other core members put their feelings before trans women’s need for safety and scapegoated me. It was only after the aforementioned core member of your collective violated my sexual boundaries, demonstrating even to the most loyal member of your collective that my concerns were justified, that the verbal abuse subsided. But still no justice. It was nearly two years before representatives of your collective met with me to talk about what had happened. Your collective made four promises to me and to Chicago’s queer and trans community. It immediately kept the only promise that required it to do nothing substantial—the promise to publicly apologize. To this day it has not kept its other three promises. But it has found new ways to hurt me, including publishing personal correspondence that had the potential to out me. The last time I asked CDMC about its cascading failure, it gave me no collective answer, but in 2012 one of its members responded in a way that now seems like eerie foreshadowing: She said that your collective owed me nothing because I had already gotten my “pound of flesh”, thus drawing a connection between me and an antisemitic caricature.

I am hardly the only one who wants answers from your collective. Many people are now asking, “Was the Chicago Dyke March Collective’s decision to ask three Jewish women to leave the march antisemitic?” It is a fair question. The political right likes to use divide-and-conquer schemes to keep us from uniting to confront oppression. As April Rosenblum argued in The Past Didn’t Go Anywhere, one of the most successful instances of this scheme has been the scapegoating of Jewish people to keep us from focusing on our real oppressors. Blaming diasporic Jewish people for the actions of the State of Israel is the latest variation on a theme at least as old as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Of course not all fair questions have “yes” as an answer. To find out if your collective’s actions play into systemic bias against Jewish people we need to look at the facts. I was not at the march, so I will charitably assume the account your collective gave in its statement is true. You wrote, “We have since learned that at least one of these individuals is a regional director for A Wider Bridge” (emphasis mine). Does it need to be said that what you learned about one of the Jewish women after you asked her to leave the march could not have been the reason you asked the women to leave the march? You also wrote that the women were “carrying Israeli flags superimposed on rainbow flags”. If the flags you were referring to were like the one seen in a photograph published to the web site of the Windy City Times on Saturday, there was nothing superimposed on them besides Stars of David, making them no different from the Jewish pride flags I first saw at Dyke March in 2005 (five years before A Wider Bridge was founded). The Star of David is a symbol of Judaism and my people, the Jewish people, and there is nothing inherently Zionist about it. It is evident to me that your collective has put some people’s feelings before Jewish queer women’s need for queer community.

I find no comfort in your assurance that “anti-Zionist Jewish volunteers and supporters are welcome at Dyke March and were involved in conversations with the individuals who were asked to leave”. For one thing, Jewish people, including those of us who express our pride through the use of Jewish symbolism, should not have to be extensively educated on all political viewpoints before we can participate in an event that is purportedly for all “dyke, queer, and trans” people. For another, all too often Jewish people are subjected to a political litmus test that non-Jewish people are not. (Nobody asked me what my views on Palestine were before they found out I had Jewish ancestry. Such selective outspokenness on Palestine does a disservice to both Jews and Palestinians.) Finally, it reminds me of the reassurances I heard after your collective violated me—that there were trans people who nevertheless stood among you. The goal of solidarity is not to collect oppressed people to insulate yourself from criticism even while you crush us. Rather, the goal of solidarity is to stand with all who are being crushed throughout our struggles even while we resist internalized oppression. In 2010 your collective’s insistence that I was “welcome” to participate in a march with people who had hurt me did not stop your collective from violating me again. And in 2017 your collective’s insistence that the Jewish people you approve of are “welcome” to participate in a march where my people have been harassed does not make your collective any less antisemitic.

L’shalom,
Veronika Boundless

  Can people start getting upset that white supremacists and neo-nazis keep stealing symbols from Asatru? A religion that has nothing to do with white supremacy and is a MODERN religion still practiced today? Hell, it’s one of the most progressive religions in existence and the Icelandic branch even fought for marriage equality, separation of church and state, and even stated:

  “ We strongly oppose any attempt by individuals to use their association with the Ásatrúarfélagið of Iceland to promote attitudes, ideologies and practices rejected by the leadership of the Ásatrúarfélagið. We particularly reject the use of Ásatrú as a justification for supremacy ideology, militarism and animal sacrifice. “

  So why do people just willingly let nazis steal symbols that are a part of these Nordic country’s history and culture, just to turn them into images of fear and hate? There are still many many people that practice Asatru paganism that have absolutely NOTHING to do with these hate groups and their religion is getting taken away from them. If you would be outraged by hate groups taking Christian/Muslim/Budist/Jewish symbols and making them the face of evil, please extend your outrage to help the overlooked people of the Asatru faith.

  I know a lot of people probably don’t even know about Asatru, but please be aware that not everyone with Nordic symbols is a hate-fueled white supremacist. It pains me to see so many people be ignorant on the subject, so I’d like to just spread awareness. 

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Ketubbah from Kerala in Kochi, India.

This ketubbah blends visual motifs found across the Jewish Diaspora—a crown, symbolizing the Torah, and the rampant lions of Judah—with the depiction of ten parrots, birds celebrated in southern Indian poetry and folklore.

Erasure of Jewish Identity and Culture in Marvel

(Not including X-Men films: I’m not up to discussing the tragedy of the X-Men movies and the complete erasure of all Jewish characters besides Magneto, the villain, today.)


Honestly, as a Jewish person in America this ongoing erasure of Jewish identity and culture Marvel is committing doesn’t even surprise me. This sort of subtle anti-Semitism that Marvel is participating in is par for the course. The erasure of Jewish identity and culture is so common most people don’t even pause to consider it, and if they do they don’t consider it anti-Semitic. After all, they don’t hate Jews, they don’t insult Jews, they don’t attack Jews, they don’t think Jews are bad or evil, so OF COURSE it isn’t anti-Semitism if you just pretend that Jews don’t exist and destroy Jewish character’s identities. It’s just a change of backstory, after all!


The erasure of Jewish characters and the destruction of characters created by Jews is not a change of backstory, Marvel, it is anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism is defined as hostility, prejudice or discrimination against Jews. By erasing Jewish characters you are discriminating, or participating in unjust treatment, against them on account of their religion. By ignoring the huge contributions of Jewish writers and artists who gave life to so many comics characters you are being prejudiced. Your hostility, or unfriendliness and opposition, to the inclusion of Jewish characters and the defamation of characters created as allegories by Jews are anti-Semitism, Marvel.


Ignoring, or ret-conning, the fact that Wanda and Pietro Maximoff are ethnically half Jewish and Roma, and always have been, is anti-Semitic and racist. Their heritage may not have played a significant plot point, but it certainly influenced their decisions and motivations. Turning Jewish-Roma Wanda and Pietro Maximoff into volunteers for the fascist-Hydra organization headed by von Strucker, a Nazi, to conduct illegal medical experiments on, is wrong.



Turning Steve Rogers, who has always stood as an allegorical shield for the Jewish people against the Nazi’s and fascism in general, into a fascist Hydra member, is disgusting. Turning Steve Rogers’ who served as Erskine’s (a Jewish scientist’s) golem, his creation and stand-in, to defeat the Nazi’s into a member of Hydra, is revolting.


Fun fact: Captain America’s iconic shield is an allegory in and of itself. What in English is called the Jewish Star or Star of David, one of the most recognizable Jewish symbols in the world, is in Hebrew called the Magen David (Yiddish the Mogein Dovid) which translates to the Shield of David. Steve’s shield with the star on it, used to protect him as he fought Hitler and the Nazi’s in the early comics, was an allegory to a powerful and well known Jewish symbol that the Nazi’s were corrupting. It was a ‘spit in your eye, fuck you’ to the Nazi’s and Jack Kirby and Joe Simon knew that their Jewish readers, desperate for news that the Nazi’s would be stopped and their families were safe, would recognize it.



I’ve seen comments on the Jewish actors in the MCU not being allowed to play Jewish characters. I feel that if in canon the characters are actively shown not to be Jewish, or it’s heavily implied at least, then it’s appropriate for the Jewish actors to portray that character as Christian or Muslim or Hindu or Atheist, or whatever that character religiously identifies as. However, for a character like Darcy Lewis, who is not a canon character in the comics at all, how hard would it be to have her say a throwaway line about her Bat Mitzvah? Or to have Jane Foster (whose religion is never mentioned in the comics) mention her Bubbe (grandmother) in a ‘my Bubbe always said’ way?


I have to wonder what would happen if Marvel suddenly decided that Sam Wilson wasn’t black? What if they thought Wakanda would be better served as a European nation? What if Kamala Khan was found to support a fascist regime? Why is it okay to erase and ignore Jews as both characters and creators? Why are Marvel’s actions not being called out as the anti-Semitism it is?



It doesn’t matter what reason Marvel gives for their choice to make Steve Rogers’ a fascist, a Nazi. It doesn’t matter if it’s a plot twist, a time-change, a clone, a triple agent or a cry for attention. Marvel has taken a character that has stood for freedom and doing the right thing, a hero and a symbol of hope not only to Jews but to people around the world that there are people who have the courage to fight back against oppression, and they have destroyed him. They can never take this back, there is no ‘oops’ here. Even if they retcon this arc in the future, like they did with William Burnside, they have destroyed the legacy of Captain America.


Wasn’t it enough to erase Wanda and Pietro Maximoff’s past? Why do you have to ruin Captain America too?


Jack Kirby and Joe Simon received death threats for creating Steve Rogers, Captain America, in a time when many Americans were either Nazi sympathizers or content to keep their head in the sand. It was a time when Jewish families checked their mailboxes every day praying for a letter from their parents, siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins still in Europe. It was a time when the US turned away boatloads of Jewish refugees fleeing Europe.  It was a time when the Third Reich steadily gained more and more land and more and more power, and while many European nations fought back against the rise of fascism the US refused to involve itself in Europe’s war despite knowing the threat Hitler posed. Kirby and Simon were surrounded by this environment of fear, because no one knew what was truly happening in Europe, but knew they had to do something about it. It is an insult to the memories of Jack Kirby and Joe Simon.  It is morally repugnant to make Captain America into a Nazi.



Marvel has erased Jewish identities of characters in both the comics and the films. That was bad enough. But now? Marvel has taken a hero I love, and have loved since I was a child, and perverted it. They have taken Captain America and twisted him around into a parody of all that he has ever stood for. They have taken a character that was literally created by two Jews to stand against the Nazi’s and say ‘screw you’ to Hitler for all the Jews who couldn’t, and made him into a Nazi. As a Jew and a fan of comics for most of my life I feel like I have been spat on and kicked while I’m down. 

The Star of David is allied with Jewish mysticism and still holds to the original representation of the star tetrahedron also known as the Merkaba.  

The upward pointing star represents the sun, fire and masculine energy.  The downward pointing star represents the moon, water and feminine energy.  As always, when the symbol is placed within a circle we see the trinity.

In the Kabbalistic tradition the hexagon symbolizes the six directions of space, the divine union of male and female and the four elements.

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According to Jewish folklore, Lilith was the first wife of Adam. She was banished from the Garden of Eden when she refused to make herself subservient to Adam. When she was cast out, she was made into a demon figure, and Adam was given a second wife, Eve, who was fashioned from his rib to ensure her obedience to her man. Lilith would not return to the Garden of Eden after she had coupled with the archangel Samael, and with him she created a host of demon children.
Other folktales describe of how Lilith captured Jewish babies in the night and ate them, and how she led young girls and young husbands astray. Although Lilith was demonised by early Jewish culture as a symbol of promiscuity and disobedience, many modern Jewish feminists see Lilith as a positive figure, a model of woman as equal to man in the creation story.

anonymous asked:

i don't know a lot about judaism. if you're comfortable with it, could you explain why you're against messianics? just from an outside perspective i don't really understand.

it’s all good, anon! 

so messianic “judaism” is actually just a form of evangelical x-ianity that was formed in order to try and convert jews to x-ianity by telling them that they could still do their jewish rituals while also believing as an x-ian believes

messianic “judaism” is a form of x-ianity that steals jewish ritual and jewish symbols, and many believe that they are entitled to jewish things because jesus was jewish and therefore they deserve to blend their x-ianity with judaism

basically, while some messianics are ethnically jewish (i.e. have jewish heritage), messianic “judaism” is not judaism, if that makes sense

idk if i answered your question to your liking, so if you need to know more, i’ll do my best with it

anonymous asked:

I saw this disgusting image of Cap being used as neo-nazi propaganda so do you have any that focus on anti-fascist steve?

oh boy. I always wonder with images like that, like do they have any idea that cap was created by two jewish man, packed with jewish symbolism with the goal of being extremely anti fascist? Like are they willfully ignoring every single thing about steve other than that hes a white boy? and thirdly what the fucking hell are they doing being so full of hate? Where do they get off being such disgusting examples of humans?

Anyways

Enjoy anfi-fascist Steve

A Historical Relic and a History Professor Walk into a Bar- (series) by thecommodore_squid

Steve narrowed his eyes. “I’m beginning to suspect I’ve been set up.”

“I would never,” Natasha said, feigning shock.

Steve sighed.

“God fucking dammit,” he heard someone say and looked up.

AKA
An AU in which Steve is still Captain America and Bucky is the unfortunate history professor selected to help him understand those references.

All The Angels and The Saints by Speranza

In which Steve Rogers loses God and finds God and loses God, and also: Bucky.

Anti-Fascist Avengers by edgarallanrose

Unapologetic anti-Trump fic. Less a linear story, and more a series of vignettes featuring the Avengers reacting to the political situation in America and standing up for our rights. To be updated whenever more shit goes down in this country (that is to say, frequently).

Are These The Men With Which I Am To Defend America? by Gothams_Only_Wolf

Steve Rogers knows the signs. It starts off quiet, it starts off with thunderous applause.

If he gets to punch Hitler, he gets to punch other fascists too.

family means no one gets left behind or forgotten by cosmicocean

“Why did you think I wouldn’t like you for being gay?” Steve asks gently.

“You’re Captain America.” Eli’s got his teeth clenched and is resolutely looking ahead. “You stand for truth and justice and the American way. You stand for American morals. You stand for…” he shrugs awkwardly. “Not people like me.”

Steve blows the air out of his cheeks slowly, trying to figure out how to keep the anger out of his voice so Eli doesn’t think it’s at him.

Or, Steve comes to terms with his new world, and gains some children in the process.

Not Easily Conquered-series by  dropdeaddream, WhatAreFears 

In 1945, Steve Rogers jumps from a nosediving plane and swims through miles of Arctic Ocean to a frozen shore.
In 1947, Steve Rogers marries Peggy Carter.
In 1966, the New York Times finds the lost letters of Sergeant James Buchanan Barnes.

Steve Rogers: PR Disaster by idiopathicsmile

“Wait,” says Sam, “you had a publicist?”
“For my first five months at S.H.I.E.L.D,” says Steve. “Then she quit. Uh, decisively.”
The Story of Steve “Walking PR Nightmare” Rogers, and How For a Short While He Single-Handedly Destroyed the Emotional Health of Eva Laura Ortiz, His Now Ex-Publicist

To The End, Against Odds Uncounted by RosaLui

Sarah Rogers was three months pregnant when she donned trousers and stood on a cold Manhattan sidewalk with a sign that read Mr. President, Give Women the Vote! while street urchins threw pebbles at her to the encouragement of the police.
Or: Steve is familiar with the concept of rebellion.