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During an eclipse last year over the Pacific Ocean, an Alaska Airlines jet diverted its path slightly so that it would cross the eclipse path at totality. Here’s video from a passenger on that plane. And, lots of excited yelling. You do get to zoom in so that you can see some texture in the sun’s corona around the moon. 

Apparently the point where this frame starts to darken happens somewhere around when the eclipse is 90-95% - any less than that and the area around still seems like daylight, so remember that this week. 

I’m also told that from this perspective, a plane window, you can actually see the shadow coming, although that’s not 100% clear here. Check back in a few minutes for a better video of that, it’s queued up next. There will be several planes diverting their paths into the eclipse tomorrow and a few even traveling along with the eclipse to maximize the time they spend in the Moon’s shadow

So, let's talk about Taylor Swift. 🐍

With the release of the video for “Look What You Made Me Do”, people have been noticing some… Things.
It all started with people hinting that the albums release date for November 10th was a subtle reference to the anniversary of the passing of Kanye West’s mother, Donda West. Although Taylor’s publicists insist it’s all a coincidence, some fans aren’t buying it.
Later on at the VMA awards, Swift unveiled the video and publicly released it to YouTube, where more “coincidences” were quickly called out. The first being when Swift lies in a bathtub full of jewelry, admiring her ring while singing the line “I don’t like your perfect crime”, which many people thought was a nod towards Kim Kardashian’s 2016 robbery, where she was gagged, put in a bathtub, and held at gunpoint while her jewelry was stolen.
Although it’s supposed to be a reference to a quote from Swift, talking about her character in her last album who “jet sets around the world collecting men”, gets left, and sits “crying in a bathtub full of pearls”, many people still think it has a double meaning.
Soon after that scene, Taylor cuts in with a scene depicting a car crash, with the car door opening to reveal Swift lying back in her seat holding a Grammy award. This is almost unquestionably a reference to Kanye West’s violent 2002 car accident(the same year that he won a Grammy), where he nearly died, was put in the hospital with severe injuries, and had to have his jaw rewired. What’s more is that this scene is furthered by the fact that later in the video, the same car explodes as she walks away from it. I wonder if she’s telling Kanye to crash and burn?
Finally, Swift is seen in the video holding a chainsaw on top of the wing of a jet airliner. She saws off the wing, and it falls to the ground, where later the same jet is seen in full view behind her and her alter-egos. In that shot, it appears that the jet in the video is also the same as Kanye West’s private jet, just painted gold. Once again, she’s subtly sending the message that she wants Kanye to crash and burn.
Even though some people think he deserves the drag because of his video for “Famous”, in which he showed a nude figure of Taylor Swift in his bed, calling her “that bitch” and saying “I still might f*ck Taylor”, others think she’s gone a bit too far in response, especially because of the mention of the robbery and hinting towards the anniversary of the death of Donda West.
All of that aside, it’s hard to find the humour in someone mocking someone else’s near-death experience, violent robbery, and possibly someone’s mother’s death, as well as numerous fans speculating that she’s copying Beyoncé’s “Lemonade” and “Formation” in several scenes.
When you consider that her problem with the Kardashian/West family is over a speech interruption, video gone wrong(that she apparently knew about beforehand), and a lyrical disagreement, it becomes clear that she’s gone a bit too far in mocking their robbery, violent car accident that nearly resulted in death, and tragic death of Kanye’s mother post-surgery, all for a video.
But hey, she broke the Vevo record.

When Boeing’s 747 began flying the skies in 1970, airlines took full advantage of the roomy new giant - bars, piano lounges and other common areas for passengers to stretch out and relax were common.  Here is an inaugural flight of a 747 by SAS, featuring a center buffet island while the passengers are treated to dinners of lobster and racks of lamb.  It was a last hurrah for the golden age of jet travel.

Ten Things That Are 500% True About Dean Winchester and Classic Rock Radio Stations
  1. He can tell what part of the country he’s in by which bands get the most play.  Sam thought he was making it up until Dean actually showed him an article on FiveThirtyEight about it.  Sam didn’t even know Dean knew what FiveThirtyEight was.  (“Apparently it’s a tool for proving you wrong, Sammy.”)
  2. He will judge a station harshly for censoring Steve Miller Band’s “Jet Airliner.”  (”Funky kicks?  What the hell is that?”)
  3. He wonders sometimes if radio stations realize that they’re incriminating themselves when they play Rush’s “Spirit of Radio,” or if they’re idiots like people who play The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” at political rallies.  (”Or people who think R.E.M.’s ‘The One I Love’ is romantic.”  “What?”  “Nothing.”)
  4. He has almost zero patience for most morning radio “talent” because they never.  shut.  up.  (”If I wanted to listen to some douche talk shit all day I’d call Crowley.”)
  5. He understands why the original Springsteen version of “Blinded By The Light” never gets any airplay – it’s terrible – but he wonders what kind of deal Manfred Mann made to get the cover version played all the goddamn time.  Like, the dude is still alive, so it can’t be standard crossroads fare, but something is going on there.  Maybe he should ask Cas.
  6. He will also judge any DJ who mispronounces Led Zeppelin’s “D’yer Mak’er.” (”It’s supposed to be a joke, Sam!”  “I know.  You’ve told me, like, five hundred times.”)
  7. He has a soft spot for the trivia and/or “name that tune” type call-in contests.  He almost never gets to play them – he’s always just passing through – but one of the best meals he’s ever eaten was paid for with a win from a station in Nebraska.  (”That’d be ‘Wild Horses’ by The Rolling Stones…”)
  8. He wishes fervently that stations would play almost any Warren Zevon song that is not “Werewolves of London.”  It’s catchy.  We get it.  For fuck’s sake, at least throw us a “Lawyers, Guns, and Money,” or even “Excitable Boy” now and again.  (”Hey, you want Chinese?  I think I saw a place a couple miles back…”)
  9. He remembers when “We Will Rock You” didn’t automatically segue into “We Are The Champions" and misses it.  Yeah, they go together, but they’re also meaningful on their own. And yeah, he knows that a single came out the year before he was born with the two of them together, but come on.  (”Fucking digital libraries, man…”)
  10. He wonders if all these ads for tractor companies are actually selling any tractors, because that’s fucking wild.  Chainsaws he can see, sure, but large farm equipment?  He’s got no points of reference for that.  He wishes Bobby was still around.  Bobby’d probably know.  

Bonus Thing: There’s a “modern rock” (or whatever) station up in Montana called The Moose, and it’s awful.  Every time they catch a case up there, he gives Sam shit about it.  (”Hey Sammy, I think somebody found your iPod.”  “You realize that’d be more insulting if I didn’t like Pearl Jam, right?”)

10

     In 1953, Col. Scott Crossfield would don a flight suit, parachute and helmet, then be secured to an ejection seat inside the cramped cockpit of a Douglas D-558-II Skyrocket. After weeks of planning and preparation, a four chamber rocket engine would thrust Crossfield into the history books, making him the first human being to exceed twice the speed of sound. During that golden age of flight test, few could dream that we would one day sip Champagne and watch movies aboard a double sonic airliner. Concorde would make that dream a reality.

     The joint Aérospatiale / British Aircraft Corporation Concorde flew at Mach 2, allowing passengers to enjoy opulence and comfort as they traveled from New York to London in 3.5 hours, not the 8 hours of a conventional airliner. Concorde flew for more than three decades as the first supersonic transport. It truly made the world a smaller place.

     One of only 20 built, tail number F-BVFA was the first ship delivered to Air France. She would roll up 17,820 flight hours over the course of 6,966 flights, culminating in one last landing at Washington Dulles International Airport for permanent display at Smithsonian’s Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, as the first Concorde to be permanently displayed in the United States.