Vortex rings are endlessly fascinating, and they appear throughout nature from dolphins to volcanoes and from splashes to falling drops. One way to form them is to inject a jet into a stationary fluid. Viscosity between the fast-moving jet and the quiescent surrounding fluid slows down fluid at the jet’s edge. That slower fluid slips to the rear, only to get sucked into the faster -moving flow and pushed forward again. The result is a spinning toroid, or ring. A similar method generates vortex rings by pushing a fluid out a round orifice. In this case, interaction between the fluid and the wall provides some of the force necessary to form the vortex ring. (Image credit: Irvine Lab, source)