jesus is my king

  riko (5′5″) moriyama and jean (i am ready for the sweet embrace of Death™) moreau

the foxes (boys)

the foxes (girls)

the trojans

Bad Musical Synopses


Phantom of the Opera: A speculative fiction about what would happen if Benedict Cumberbatch were a woman and his fans had access to a basement.

Hamilton: The best friend of an ambitious political dissident warns him repeatedly that his actions will end in tragedy. When that doesn’t actually happen, the best friend takes it upon himself to teach a valuable life lesson.

Jesus Christ Superstar: The best friend of an ambitious political dissident warns him repeatedly that his actions will end in tragedy. When that doesn’t actually happen, the best friend takes it upon himself to teach a valuable life lesson.

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat: Tim Gunn was sick today on Project Runway. Let’s see what happens!

Miss Saigon: White savior done fucked up. No one is surprised.

The Scarlet Pimpernel: Proto-superhero pretends to be gay. Wife is understandably miffed when she discovers she won’t be getting the D. Hilarity ensues.

The Lion King:  A Shakespearean look at a pride of liMAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSAAAAAWENYAAAAAAMAAKALAKIIIIIIIIIIIISSHUENOOONOOOOOOO

Chicago: He really did have it coming.

Cabaret: A Conservative Republican’s worst nightmare is set to music.

Cats: Furries provide a fun-filled look into an average night out.

Rent: All these people are going to die the minute you leave the theater.

Avenue Q: Today on Sesame Street, we learn an important lesson about the purpose of the internet. The word of the day is ANAL. 

Les Miserables: A man steals a loaf of bread and is chased across France by the most dedicated police officer on the force. Consequently, everyone dies.

My Fair Lady: A valuable life lesson is taught: if you want to make it in life, all you need to do is sacrifice everything, suffer torment from an obsessive linguistics major, and fake an upper-class English accent. Unless you’re a man, and then you just need to explain that you really need money for alcohol. In that case, someone will promptly die and will you their fortune.

How to Succeed In Business Without Really Trying: A young man attempts to push the boundaries of white male privilege. He soon finds there are none.

Sweeney Todd: A barber and his girlfriend take Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” a little too far.

Isaiah 43:2

When you pass through the waters,

I will be with you; 

and when you pass through the rivers,

they will not sweep over you. 

You were saved by grace. Grace came down and gave His life for you. Why oh why, would you ever abuse that grace by tainting it with sin. 

Grace is not an excuse to sin. 

Do you straighten your hair so you can go stand in the rain? Do you sweep the floor so you can walk muddy boots through? Do you pay to get your phone repaired so you can throw it against a wall?

Ephesians 2:8 “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith, and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God.” 

Grace is not an excuse to sin. It is the very reason that you can turn from your sin to righteousness. Don’t abuse it. Embrace it.

  • Sodapop: So I can either bake these cookies at 400 degrees for 10 minutes or 4,000 degrees for 1 minute.
  • Steve: That's not how cookies work.
  • Sodapop: FLOOR IT?
  • Steve: NO.
  • Sodapop: HOW ABOUT 4,000,000 DEGREES FOR 1 SECOND?
  • Steve: Sodapop, you're going to burn the house down
  • Sodapop: I’M GOING TO HARNESS THE POWER OF THE SUN
  • Steve: Sodapop, please

Psalm 24:10

10 Who is he, this King of glory?
   The Lord Almighty
   he is the King of glory.

3

The King and I, Back On Broadway: But he sure comes across when it really counts. “Shall We Dance?,” the number in which Anna teaches the King to trip the light, begins as a whimsical comic exercise. Then at a certain point, Mr. Watanabe’s eyes narrow, his voice deepens and he firmly clasps his co-star’s waist. Sex has entered the building.
Anna is only slightly startled by the arrival of genuine eroticism. As played by Ms. O’Hara, she’s a smart, scrappy, willful pragmatist who also happens to know that love is often as strange as it is undeniable. That knowledge infuses every note Ms. O’Hara sings, and it is something wonderful indeed. Ben Brantley