jessica-dimmock

Kristen Stewart, Gabourey Sidibe to direct short films for Refinery29

Actresses Kristen Stewart and Gabourey Sidibe will both make their narrative directing debuts with short films for Refinery29, the fashion and lifestyle media company announced Monday at its NewFronts presentation in New York.

The Cafe Society star and the Empire cast member are are among a dozen female filmmakers who will explore the dynamics of power via the short-form ShatterBox Anthology, which will begin running on the Refinery29 website this summer.

Details have yet to be revealed for the shorts, except that Stewart’s is titled Water and Sidibe’s is titled A Tale of Four Women. Also participating in the anthology are Jessica Sanders, Meera Menon, Tiffany Shlain, Courtney Hoffman, Jessica Dimmock, Robin Cloud, Roja Gashtili, Julia Lerman, Anu Valia, and the previously announced Chloë Sevigny.

Sevigny’s contribution, Kitty, marks her own directorial debut and is set to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival next month.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Sidibe said on stage at the presentation, “Everything I do, my image and who I am and what I feel represents me is in the hands of a man, usually a white man. … I realized very recently that I want to be the one that decides what image I show the public.”

Stewart previously directed a music video for the country-rock band Sage and the Saints in 2014. She told Rolling Stone at the time, “I’ve been saying I want to direct movies since I was 10 years old.”

Additional programming announced by Refinery29 includes two projects being executive-produced by America Ferrera (a multimedia project called Behind the Headlines and a docu-series called Only Girl); Brawlers, a YouTube channel celebrating women in sports; andChasing Daylight, a Facebook Live series streaming intimate daily conversations with international tastemakers.

Source: EW

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In 2006 in Milan young American photographer Jessica Dimmock (b. 1978) won the first F Award for socially-engaged photography for her series entitled The Ninth Floor. This disturbing portrait features a group of young heroin addicts living in a ninth-floor apartment in Manhattan, New York. Dimmock takes a disconcertingly close view of her subject, at the same time sympathetic and ruthless. The result is a series that centres on human emotions, in which despair makes way for anger, reconciliation and then bliss in quick tempo.