jerry james stone

theguardian.com
Etta James: 'I was like a punker … I'd spit in a minute'

Although consistently lauded by folk within the biz as one of the great black female singers, Etta is only just now emerging into the extreme sidelights of the great white wunnerful rock arena via a contract with Warner Brothers and her appearances on the current Rolling Stones tour of America.

“The Stones are great,” she says, slightly wistfully. “They are doing black music and they’ve got it. They got the direction and they know what the hell to do. They know how to pump plenty of sound, they know how to get real intense and get people so crazy that they don’t know what the heck’s happening to them. And that’s the way you gotta do it.

"I find myself going crazy about the Stones just like the kids are in the audience. Keith, he just stumbles over his own feet, blam, he falls down, he just lays there, blungablunga, he’s still there just like it’s part of the act. They kick each other and thump each other in the back of the head. Mick, if he forgets the damn words he just burbles and they go nuts. He forgets what part of the song he’s singing but who cares, y'know? Long as he’s there to holler something people just bump their heads on the wall, it’s great.

"But, you know, Mick told me: ‘I met you 15 years ago at a little club in Los Angeles. You were wearing a blonde wig and you had on a green dress and it had feathers …’ he named everything. He was right. And a lot of the stuff that I see him do on stage is stuff that I used to do. I mean when I was really jumping around an’ leaping an’ looking all crazy.

"I was originally like a punker, know what I mean, like the punks are today, I’d spit in a minute. And I notice Mick does that same facial expression that I see, so then I sit in the dressing room and I think it’s really weird how these guys have gotten over.

"The first night I worked with them I almost cried in my dressing room. I thought, God, here are these guys, they’re famous millionaires from doing this here and I’m still nowhere after all these years. What is happening here?

"Then I think, I don’t know, I wanna make money but I don’t probably never wanna be cool about it, you know what I mean? I would never be cool about it. I would never give a shit whether I worked Las Vegas or Lake Tahoe or not. I’m not a bourgeois person, never will be. I could work Dingwalls forever because I’m used to that kind of joint.

"Like the guys came to me last night and said, 'I’m sorry this is not like the Ritz.’ Well what the heck would I know? In 25 years I’ve never worked the Ritz; I’ve worked nothing but places that look like Dingwalls. And for those kind of people, that stand there and scream all night, and when you get through they’re mad because you don’t come back, that’s my kind of people.

"See, I don’t like places where people can’t dance – don’t like clubs or theatres where a bunch of bourgeois people sit around tip, tip, tipping their fingers.” [Read More]

2

Russian Tea Cookies from Jerry James Stone in DARK RYE’s Gather Issue

It may come as no surprise, but my fondest childhood memories are invariably tied to food; it’s borderline absurd. Interestingly enough, many of those happy moments coincide with holidays.

Maybe there’s just more food during those times? Thanksgiving always did a number on everyone’s waistline each year. Even Halloween, which seemed rather innocuous, was followed by a sugar-induced stupor. But Christmas was the real culprit as we celebrated with get-togethers (and too much food) from Christmas Eve all the way up to New Year’s Eve.

Russian tea cookies are a kind of jumble—a pastry common around England during the Middle Ages—and are known by a few different names: Mexican wedding cakes, butterballs and snowball cookies. They first appeared in Russia around the eighteenth century as a confection used in tea-sharing ceremonies but were common in the U.S. by the twentieth century…

3

Confession: I use these roasted tomatoes in everything—homemade marinara, or on grilled cheese sandwiches. They are so rich in flavor that you’ll be surprised at how easy they are to make. And once you make them, you’ll be even more surprised at how often you do.

Roasted Tomatoes

6 Tomatoes
4 cloves of garlic
1 sprig Rosemary, chopped
Olive Oil

1. Slice the tomatoes so they are about ¼ inch thick. I find the meatier they are the better they turn out. What we are doing here is caramelizing the sugars and removing liquid to intensify the flavor. If they are too thin, they just become chewy.

2. On a parchment-lined baking sheet, spread the tomatoes out in a single layer and drizzle olive oil over them. Then sprinkle them with the chopped rosemary. Add the cloves of garlic to the sheet, leaving them peeled and in tact.

3. Roast the tomatoes for 6 hours at 200 degrees F. The meat of the tomato should shrivel but they will still be a bit liquidy.

Start using them in your favorite dish!

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.

4

Guacamole Deviled Eggs

by Jerry James Stone for DARK RYE

By now, my obsession with avocados and eggs [LINK TO AVO FRIED EGG] is no secret. They are quite the pairing. I swear, if I had an avocado tree and a few chickens, I wouldn’t eat anything else. It is probably best that I do not have an avocado tree and a few chickens. That said, here is one more way to enjoy avocados and eggs. I had been meaning to hack the classic deviled egg dish for quite some time, and the avocado seemed like my perfect accomplice. Enjoy!

6 organic farm eggs
1 avocado
1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped (more for garnish)
1 teaspoon serrano chile, minced
1 teaspoon mustard seeds, finely ground
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon olive oil
New mexico chile powder (for garnish)

1. Carefully place the eggs in a sauce pan and fill the pan with enough water to cover the eggs by 1-inch.

2. Bring the water to a boil over a medium-high heat. Once it is boiling, turn of the heat and remove the eggs from the stove. Cover them and let them sit for about 20 minutes.

3. To stop the eggs from over cooking and turning the yolk gray (like I did because I got distracted by Hulu), empty the hot water and replace it with cold water.

4. Once the eggs are just cool enough to touch, crack each egg on each end by firmly tapping it on a hard surface. Placing the side of the egg on the counter, roll it with the palm of your hand while slightly applying pressure. The shell should crackle all over but be careful to not squish the egg. Place the egg in a bowl of warm water and the shell should slide right off.

5. Half the eggs, placing the cooked yolks into a mixing bowl. Add one tablespoon chopped cilantro, one teaspoon of minced serrano chile, one teaspoon of ground mustard seed, one tablespoon of lemon juice, ¼ teaspoon of salt, and ¼ teaspoon of olive oil. Mix it well.

6. Half the avocado, pit it and mash it in a separate mixing bowl.

7. Fold together the egg mixture and the mashed avocado. I like the yellow and green contrast so I suggest not overdoing it here. The marbled effect is quite pleasing to the eye.

8. Scoop heaping spoonfuls of the mixture into the halved eggs. You can use a pastry bag if you want it to be all pretty and stuff, but ain’t nobody got time for that! I like the messier look and plus I want to get to eating these eggs! Top with some chile powder and cilantro. Enjoy!

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.
5

You are probably thinking, why are these deviled eggs pink, right? Well, this recipe is sorta like a martini deviled egg. The eggs are pickled (using a beet-based brine) and then vodka is added to the filling. Are you drooling yet?

They’re the perfect deviled egg really, and they’re easier to make than they look! I promise. The brine is quite simple and once you make it, you just have to store some eggs in it. After the eggs pickle, it is business as usual…except with more vodka!

Spiked Deviled Eggs

Yields 12 spiked deviled eggs

6 Eggs
3 Cups Water
1 Beet, peeled and sliced
1 Garlic clove
2 Tablespoons Brown Sugar
4 Sprigs of thyme
1 Bay Leaf
1 Tablespoon whole peppercorns
1 Cup apple cider vinegar
1 1/8 Teaspoons Salt
¼ Teaspoon dried anise seed
1 Tablespoon Mayonnaise
1 Teaspoon Vinegar
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
2 Tablespoons Vodka
1 Tablespoon dijon mustard
Rosemary
1 Serrano Pepper, sliced

1. Bring 3 cups water, 1 peeled beet, a clove of garlic, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, a bay leaf, tablespoon peppercorns, 1 cup vinegar, ¼ teaspoon anise seed and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil, then simmer covered for about 20 minutes until the beet is tender. Let mixture cool completely.

2. At the same time the brine is cooking, carefully place the eggs in another sauce pan and fill the pan with enough water to cover the eggs by 1-inch.

3. Bring the water to a boil over a medium-high heat. Once it is boiling, turn off the heat and remove the eggs from the stove. Cover them and let them sit for about 20 minutes.

4. To stop the eggs from over cooking and turning the yolk gray, empty the hot water and replace it with cold water. You can even add ice.

5. Once the eggs are cool enough to touch, crack each egg on each end by firmly tapping it on a hard surface. Placing the side of the egg on the counter, roll it with the palm of your hand while slightly applying pressure. The shell should crackle all over but be careful to not squish the egg. Place the egg in a bowl of warm water and the shell should slide right off.

6. Place the eggs and brine in a container now adding the fresh thyme and serrano chiles, seal it and chill it in the refrigerator, stirring every few hours. Depending on how pickled (and pink) you want your eggs, let them sit for at least 10 hours.

7. When brining is finished, cut each egg in half and scoop out yolks. Place yolks in a medium-sized bowl, along with the tablespoon mustard, tablespoon mayonnaise, teaspoon vinegar, and 2 tablespoons olive oil. Mix/mash until smooth. Add the 1/8 teaspoon salt but salt to taste. Be careful here, it is really easy to over salt deviled eggs. I would work the salt in portions at a time and taste as you go.

8. Add in ¼ of the vodka and mix well. The key here is to make them super boozy but not liquify the yolk mixture. If the consistency holds, add in the remaining vodka, ¼ at a time. In fact, you can add more if your yolks allow it. This is variable because of the egg size.

9. Using a pastry bag or a plastic bag with the corner cut off, pipe the yolk mixture back into the pink eggs. Sprinkle with chopped rosemary and chill. Enjoy!

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.

3

I admit, as a home chef, one of my favorite things to do is substitution. And one of my favorite things to substitute for is the tomato. Don’t get me wrong, I am an avid fan of tomatoes. Love them, really.

But they are so ubiquitous that replacing them with something else is always an interesting challenge. That is where the inspiration came from for this caprese salad. I still wanted to use a fruit–like the tomato–but I wanted something a bit unexpected.

Mango was the perfect choice. Like the tomato, though sweet, it has earthier notes to it that allow it to be used in a variety of ways. I decided to grill it to showcase those flavors even more. And boy did it work! This salad is as tasty as it is gorgeous! Enjoy.

This salad recipe uses my Marinated Mozzarella Cheese, which is bursting with lime, cilantro and basil—yum! It goes so well with the grilled mangos that it is bound to be a favorite.

Caprese Mango Salad

yields 3 servings

2 Mangos
½ Pound Fresh Mozzarella Marinated in Basil & Lime
10 fresh basil leaves
Olive Oil  

1. Okay, if you haven’t made my marinated mozzarella cheese recipe, get at it! It is super tasty. You don’t need use that for this recipe…you can use plain cheese. But why would you do that?

2. Now you need to slice those mangos. Instead of cutting it into chunks, I just did strips. Easy breezy!

3. Grill the mangos such that they have these lovely grill marks on each side. Man, they are so good this way. It was difficult to not eat them all up fresh off the grill.

4. Now serve it up, layering the basil, grilled mangos and mozzarella cheese. Drizzle olive oil over it and chill it in the fridge for about 20 minutes before serving.

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.

2

Had about enough of dinner plates that weigh ten pounds? Lighten up with a summertime-like dinner party in January. Salads, thai rolls, rice noodles, avocado, fresh mint. Jerry’s got you covered. Start here:

Watermelon Gazpacho by Jerry James Stone in DARK RYE’s Home Issue

“A good chilled soup is the perfect first course.”

It not only keeps the kitchen cool, but if you want to wander about, it can easily be served in any glassware. This watermelon gazpacho is the perfect summer soup!

You’ll need 1 cucumber, 2 tomatoes, 14 cup cilantro, loosely chopped, 14 cup basil, loosely chopped, 1 serrano chile, 6 cups of cubed watermelon, 1 lime, 1 teaspoon sugar and a pinch of salt.

Peel and seed the cucumber, then cut it into equal parts. Quarter the tomatoes, removing the seeds. Run the cilantro, basil and serrano chile through the food processor until the herbs are finely chopped, then transfer them to a large pitcher. Purée the watermelon, tomatoes and cucumbers in batches, then add them to the pitcher by running them through a sieve to remove any of the larger chunks (this is optional of course). Juice the lime and add it to the pitcher, along with the sugar and the salt, mixing well. After chilling it for an hour, the soup can easily be poured into any cup or bowl.

3

Healthy Breakfast Crème Brûlée

Too much work is often the excuse for eating poorly or just eating out a lot. But regardless of how much work you have to get done, you can still eat well. You can even eat fabulously well!

This breakfast dish is the perfect example. It’s quick to make, healthy, visually divine and oh so tasty. Who knew oatmeal could look so good?

I call it Breakfast Crème Brûlée mostly because of the experience in eating it. There is no cream, in fact it is vegan. But with the brûléed topping and served in a ramekin, how can you not call it that?

    1 cup old-fashioned oats
    2 cups of water
    1 cup unsweetened berries
    ¼ cup nuts, chopped
    ½ cup dried berries
    ½ teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    ¼ cup maple syrup (optional)

1. Bring the water to a boil and add in the oats and salt. Reduce to a low simmer and cook for five minutes. Remove from the heat and let sit covered for two minutes.

2. Divide the berries (I used frozen as fresh are not in season yet here), nuts, and dried berries along with the oatmeal between two ramekins.

3. Top with the brown sugar. If you want to add in maple syrup, do it before adding the brown sugar.

4. Place the ramekins on a baking sheet and in the broiler on high for about 5 minutes, making sure it doesn’t burn.

Serve warm and enjoy!

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.

Our main bud Jerry James Stone’s got Three Loaves movement underway. Why? To “kick hunger’s ass”, for starters. Join him:

Join Three Loaves.

ONE LOAF FOR YOU.
ONE LOAF FOR A FRIEND.
ONE FOR SOMEONE IN NEED.

Join the Three Loaves movement and help kick hunger’s ass. Each month, we’ll email you a fresh, seasonal recipe. You’ll make three loaves: one for you, one for a friend, and one for someone in need.

No more BPA-laced cans of food! Because, if you won’t eat it, why should anyone else?

Real food for real people, using seasonal, whole food ingredients…

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Lynmar Estate: Sustainable Winery Teaches Kids to Cook While Feeding Those In Need

~ Jerry James Stone

Tucked away in Wine Country’s picturesque Russian River Valley–some 50 miles north of San Francisco–is Lynmar Estate, a sustainable vineyard and winery, and almost virtual garden of eden. With 40-something acres of grapevines, nine of which are over 40 years old, the ranch is a wooly mix of ornamental and edible fruits and vegetables, which literally grow up together side-by-side. But it’s not their philosophy on farming or their amazing wine that makes Lynmar Estate so special, it’s their partnership with The Ceres Community Project that does.

Fruits and vegetables that are sustainably grown at the vineyard are then donated to Ceres where the yield is then used to teach teenagers how to cook; the prepared food is then delivered to cancer and AIDS patients within the community.

“Cooking for someone who is sick is really nice,” says 14-year-old Candler Weinberg. “I can walk out of here every week feeling like I helped change someone’s life.” And she has! Every year, Ceres–aptly named after the Roman goddess of agriculture–delivers some 30,000 meals to those in need. That’s a pretty impressive number considering only about 50 or so teenagers participate in the project.

I cannot even begin to explain how much this warms my heart. For example, fewer than 10-percent of U.S. teenagers eat their recommended five fresh fruits and veggies every day. But through the sustainable practices of Lynmar Estate and community actions by Ceres, teenagers are eating better, learning to cook, and feeding those in need. How is that for a warm fuzzy feeling?

Rob Hogencamp, the project’s chef, recalled his shock the day the kids first made caramelized Brussels sprouts,”I literally had to ask [the kids] to stop eating the Brussels sprouts!” Brussels are a cruciferous vegetable that contains potent cancer risk-reducing chemicals. It’s also worth noting that parents are usually begging kids to eat them, not the other way around.

If you are looking for a new way to enjoy brussels, try my Brussels Sprout & Tangerine Couscous Salad.

Typically, Ceres provides about four meals a week to patients and their families. Luckily, Lynmar Estate has enough to go around. Tomatoes, tomatillos, leeks, fennel, carrots, lettuces, and red kale are just a few of the crops they grow. And they even pay close attention to crop rotation so that the same vegetables are never planted in the same beds over and over.

Eytan Navah, Lynmar’s head gardener, goes on to explain, “You’ll see we got a lot of different things growing together. Nothing is in blocks, like a block of broccoli here, a block of chard there, etc. We’re not doing any kind of monoculture farming. We’ve created an ecosystem where we’re planting lots of different flowers along with our edible plants, creating more of a harmonious environment for the plants, and for the creatures that are living in this ecosystem.”

Not that it takes much convincing for me to partake in wine from Lynmar Estate, but now I have a few more reasons to visit. Their collaboration with Ceres the perfect partnership if there ever was one. And, if you make your way to the vineyard, try their Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, as it is a particular favorite of mine. There’s probably a good chance you’ll run into me there.

Jerry James Stone has been eating and drinking his veggie way through San Francisco for the past four years where he focuses on sustainability and local as well as large-scale food issues.