jason stockley

On Jason Stockley’s Acquittal

Here are a couple couple modest observations I made regarding the recent acquittal of white police officer killing a black man in St. Louis after reading the judge’s opinion:

TL;DR: Stockely could have easily been convicted of murder.

1) Jason Stockley probably shouldn’t have been an officer to begin with.

Stockley carried an AK-47 in violation of department policy, and knew it was violation of policy. He kept the weapon as a “deterrant” to those who might do him harm while on duty, but of course he was already provided a weapon. If someone is going to be so scared of their duty that they’ll violate policy, they shouldn’t put on the badge.

2) Anthony Smith posed a real threat to others.

When Smith was approached by Stockley and Bianchi, Stockley’s partner, Smith drove into Stockley’s police car, another vehicle, and sped off at speeds close to 90 mph. Bianchi says that he saw a gun at the time Smith drove off. In those circumstances, Stockley’s decision to prepare for lethal force is justified by established criminal procedure and civil rights law, but…

3) That being said, Stockley committed first degree murder.

State law provided that first degree murder had been committed when a person i) knowingly causes the death of another after ii) deliberation on the matter. Deliberation, being a period of cool reflection no matter how instantaneous. Once the police chase began Stockley is heard on tape saying “we’re killing this motherfucker, don’t you know.” Stockley had reflected after Smith drove off, and decided then and there that there would not be a peaceful solution to this encounter. This was not just an officer neutralizing a threat; Stockley decided Smith had to die and acted accordingly.

4) Stockley’s self-defense argument is bogus.

Stockley justifies shooting Smith five times on his subjectively reasonable view that Smith had a gun. A gun was found in Smith’s car, but it had no traces of Smith’s DNA. It seems abnormal for someone to own a gun, but leave absolutely no trace. The court opinion also provides no account for who owns the gun or registration, but notes that Stockley’s DNA was on the retrieved gun.

Stockley’s defense is that he commanded Smith to open the car door once the vehicle had been stopped, and then fired once Smith didn’t comply but instead reached for his gun. The defense focused on one of Smith’s bullet wounds being on his left side, and hence consistent with Smith reaching for a gun, but that’s also consistent with Smith merely sitting in the driver’s seat. Furthermore, the stop, commands, and shots all occurred within a mere 15 seconds! Smith’s car was stopped by Bianchi ramming into it with a police cruiser so forcefully that the airbags deployed. That is to say, Stockely expects us to believe that Smith had been hit on the highway, recovered from the shock, and was cognizant enough to obey Stockley’s commands from an armed officer all within a ¼ minute?

5) The judge was admittedly biased, and selectively weighed certain factors more than others.

Judge Wilson did believe Stockley though, but possibly for prejudicial reasons. The Judge makes great weight of the fact that no officers testified to Stockley planting a gun in Smith’s car, but of course this ignores the cultural problems of cover ups that police departments have had. Judge Wilson also recounts events from the video tapes as if he could see everything perfectly (”there was no bulge in any pocket indicating a gun within the pocket”), but cell phone and dash cam footage is far from pristine. Rather hypocritically, the Judge uses Bianchi’s judgment of seeing a gun to justify Stockely’s reaction, but ignore’s Bianchi’s perception that Smith wasn’t a threat.

Finally, the Judge finalizes his opinion with “The Court observes, based on its nearly thirty years on the bench, that an urban heroin dealer not in possession of a firearm would be an anomaly” to argue that Smith must have had a gun. Judges may make basic judicial observations based on commonplace knowledge, but to speculate that Smith must have had a gun because he was an “urban” (Read black?) drug dealer is pure prejudice and assumption. This admission is particularly dreadful given Judge Wilson speaks against speculation not one paragraph later.

Protest in STL (part 2/3)

What Happened:

1. The protest arrived at the Mayor’s house. It was still peaceful.

2. Some protestors went up to her door. They were trying to get her to come out. Specifically, instructions were: Were there any white, female allies willing to do this.

3. There was the sound of something breaking. Protestors continued to stand outside Mayor’s house.

4. One of the organizers (maybe) state that there, “might be a small chance that this is not the Mayor’s house.”

5. Shortly after the organizers say this, there’s a louder shattering sound. 

6. Everyone runs maybe half a block.

7. A few minutes pass and organizers start ushering everyone back to the main intersection and road.

8. As we arrived at the intersection, the first bus of SWAT arrived. Followed by several more.

Notes:

The media will probably say that this protest was not peaceful and something about ‘dangerous’ protestors.

As far as I could tell, this protest was peaceful right up until a few assholes threw rocks at the Mayor’s window.

I didn’t see this, but apparently teargas was used and bricks were thrown at police officers afterwards. 

But again, and I want to stress this, 99% of the protestors were peaceful. More than 99%. It was the few assholes that put people in danger.

Part 1, Part 3

Why are we ghosting on St. Louis right now?!

The police got away with stated, premeditated murder and are now actively provoking protesters and outright lying about protester violence. They are on video breaking windows! They are seen collecting bottles and rocks that were not thrown! They are doxxing protesters, and purposefully overcharging. They are attacking peaceful protesters and then charging them.

They murder a person and are now stocking hostilities. Why are we being silent?! Why aren’t we spreading anything?!

Protests erupt in St. Louis after ex-officer’s acquittal

Protesters chanting “free our people” gathered outside the jail in downtown St. Louis for more than two hours to show solidarity with those arrested during demonstrations that turned ugly over the weekend, but there was no new vandalism overnight.

Demonstrators outside the jail late Monday criticized authorities for keeping some of those arrested in jail for nearly 24 hours after they were taken into custody. Police said more than 120 people were arrested during Sunday’s protests over the acquittal of a white former police officer in the killing of a black suspect.

Some of those jailed were released Monday evening before organizers announced an end to the demonstration and told people to go home. Organizers said protests will resume Tuesday, but they gave no details.

Monday was the fourth day of protests.

Three days of peaceful protests and three nights of vandalism followed Friday’s announcement that a judge found ex-officer Jason Stockley not guilty in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith. (AP)

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Protesters stand outside of the St. Louis city jail on Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The protesters chanted “free our people” outside the jail on Monday night to show solidarity with those who remain behind bars. Police said that more than 120 people were arrested during Sunday’s protests. Monday was the fourth day of protests over the acquittal of a white former police officer in the killing of a black suspect. (Photo: David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

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Police arrest a man as demonstrators march in response to a not guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, in St. Louis. Stockley was acquitted in the 2011 killing of a black man following a high-speed chase. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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People walk in downtown after a peaceful protest response to a not guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley turned violent Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, in St. Louis. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Police officers, ordering the last remaining protesters on the street to get on the ground, spray a chemical agent at those not complying, after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 17, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Police arrive as demonstrators march in response to a not guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, in St. Louis. Stockley was acquitted in the 2011 killing of a black man following a high-speed chase. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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A woman poses for a portrait as she protests the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 17, 2017. (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters)

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Police in riot gear and a protester stand near a burned U.S. flag after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 17, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Demonstrators protest outside the St. Louis Police Department headquarters in response to a not guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, in St. Louis. Stockley was acquitted on Friday in the 2011 killing of a black man following a high-speed chase. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Demonstrators protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley stage a die-in in front of police headquarters on Sept.17, 2017 in St. Louis, Missouri. This is the third day of protests in the city following the acquittal of Stockley, who had been charged with first-degree murder last year following the 2011 on-duty shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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A woman says a prayer next to a police officer during protests after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 17, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Police officers detain a demonstrator protesting the day after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters)

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A man is treated after being pepper sprayed as police tried to clear a violent crowd Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, in University City, Mo. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Police arrest demonstrators protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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A worker cleans up broken glass from a window smashed during a protest of the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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People march the day after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters)

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Demonstrators confront police while protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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A protester confront police during the second night of demonstrations after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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A protester is sprayed with mace by riot police after throwing a chair through a window of a business during the second night of demonstrations after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Paint thrown by a protestor runs down the shield of a Police officer during a demonstration to protest the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Demonstrators protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley march through University City on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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A man yells at police in riot gear just before a crowd turned violent Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, in University City, Mo. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Demonstrators protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley march through University City neighborhood on Sept. 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Police officers watch as people march the day after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters)

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Police arrest a man as they try to clear a violent crowd Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, in University City, Mo. Earlier, protesters marched peacefully in response to a not guilty verdict in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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A protester participates in a “Die-In” during a second day of demonstrations after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Demonstrators march through the West County Mall protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on September 16, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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People march through West County Mall a day after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 2017. (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters

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Law enforcement officers stand guard during a protest action following a not guilty verdict on Sept.15, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images)

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Protestors demonstrate during a protest action following a not guilty verdict on Sept.15, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images)

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Protesters march, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in St. Louis, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was fatally shot following a high-speed chase in 2011.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

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Police line up as protesters gather, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in St. Louis, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was fatally shot following a high-speed chase in 2011. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Protesters react after getting pepper sprayed by St. Louis Police Department officers after the not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Protesters gather, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in St. Louis, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was fatally shot following a high-speed chase in 2011. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Police arrest a protester as protesters gather, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in St. Louis, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was fatally shot following a high-speed chase in 2011. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Protestors take shelter in the Central Reform Jewish Congregation Center amid a protest action following a not guilty verdict oon Sept.15, 2017 in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo: Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images)

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St. Louis Police Department officers stand on the street in riot gear after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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A woman who was pushed down by police is helped by a protester while police try to desperse a crowd, after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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“The boxed us in and started peppy spraying us,” said Mackenzie Marks of St. Louis, who her eyes washed out after being pepper spray protesting the not guilty verdict in the killing of Anthony Lamar Smith by former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, near City Hall. (Photo: Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

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Protesters shield themselves from pepper spray by police in riot gear during a protest after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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Activists hold placards during a demonstation after a not guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

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People march downtown after the not guilty verdict was announced in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/Reuters)

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“It is our duty to fight for our freedom,” shouts LaShell Eikerenkoetter of Jennings, Mo., who protest the not guilty verdict in the killing of Anthony Lamar Smith by former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

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St. Louis police standoff with protesters after the not guilty verdict of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, on Tucker Blvd in downtown St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/Reuters)

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Chris Tomlin plays a sousaphone as protesters gather, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, in downtown St. Louis, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was fatally shot following a high-speed chase in 2011. (Photo: Jeff Roberson/AP)

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Members of National Park Service watch as protesters pass the Old Courthouse after the not guilty verdict was announced in the murder trial of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer, charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/Reuters)

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A sign hangs from barricades outside the courthouse during a police standoff with protesters after the not guilty verdict of Jason Stockley, a former St. Louis police officer charged with the 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, outside the courthouse in St.Louis, Mo., Sept. 15, 2017. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/Reuters)

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Jason Stockley, an ex-St.Louis police officer pictured in this police handout photo obtained by Reuters, Aug.10, 2017. (Photo: Harris County Sheriff’s Office/Handout via Reuters)

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This undated family photo supplied by Christina Wilson shows Anthony Lamar Smith holding his daughter Autumn Smith. Anthony Lamar Smith was killed in 2011 during a confrontation with police.(Family photo courtesy Christina Wilson via AP)

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information on the stockley case:
-in 2011, jason stockley, a white police officer, chased anthony lamar smith, a young unarmed black man, on alleged drug possession
-jason stockley had an illegal & unregistered ak-47 in the back of his police van, along with his issued police handgun
-jason stockley is recorded saying “i’m gonna kill this motherf*cker” in official police audio & video recordings, expressing intent to kill
-jason stockley shot mr smith 5 times with his handgun, killing him
-stockley then planted the gun on smith’s body as a scapegoat for his reason to kill
-stockley was recorded on his dash cam & by security cameras as to have gone back and forth from his vehicle to smith’s body after the murder
-stockley was charged with murder, but stayed on the police force for several years
-his trial was 6 years later on september 15 2017
-4 different sources of camera footage (with sound) of stockley committing this act were provided as evidence, as well as forensic swabs that proved that only stockley’s dna was on the gun and therefore smith could never have threatened him with it
-and yet. jason stockley was sentenced not guilty. he was acquitted.
-anthony lamar smith was 24 years old when he died. he left behind a young daughter and a girlfriend.

anonymous asked:

Hey, I feel like you have a big enough platform, could you let people know about the protests in STL about the acquittal of Jason Stockley? He murdered Anthony Lamar Smith and planted a weapon on him, with Stockley's DNA found inside the firearm, and was still found not guilty.

“To be specific, the firearm was an AK-47 which is, and was a personal weapon of Jason Stockley. He shot Anthony Lamar Smith five times point blank. We promised at least 30 days of unrest in the event of his acquittal until something is done.”