japanese motif

Part of the Japanese understanding of nonverbal communication comes from Zen Buddhism, which teaches the use of all five senses in receiving communication, and even states, “silence is communication.” In this tradition, Koichi Sato brings delicate color motifs and metaphysical forms to his quietly poetic designs.

Koichi Sato, Agamemnon, 1972, Offset lithography. 

(Spoiler Alert) Danganronpa Second Execution Torture

“I! SAID! WAAAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIT!!!!!!”

“Sorry, man…I couldn’t keep the promise we made…From one man to another.”

Game: Danganronpa - Trigger Happy Havoc

Executed: Mondo Owada

Title: Ultimate Biker Gang Leader

Execution: “The Cage Of Death”

Execution Motif: The Story Of The Little Black Sambo

Cause Of Death: Electrocution and G-Force Liquefaction

“P-Please, Peko! Don’t go! I need you! Don’t leave me!”

“Young…master? …Young master!”

Game: Danganronpa 2 - Goodbye Despair

Executed: Peko Pekoyama

Title: Ultimate Swordswoman

Execution: “One Woman Army”

Execution Motif: Traditional Japanese Art

Cause Of Death: Multiple Stab Wounds

“Run! Run, Kirumi!!!”

“Please ruuuun!!!”

“Run! Please hurry!”

“Hurry! Run!”

“I WILL NOT DIIIIIIIIIIE!!!”

Game: Danganronpa V3 - Killing Harmony

Executed: Kirumi Tojo

Title: Ultimate Maid

Execution: “Strand Thread Of Agony”

Execution Motif: Politics and the Indian Rope Trick

Cause Of Death: Multiple Laceration Wounds and Fatal Impact Fall


First Murder: Sayaka Maizono, Ultimate Imposter, Rantaro Amami

First Execution: Leon Kuwata, Teruteru Hanamura, Kaede Akamatsu

Second Murder: Chihiro Fujisaki, Mahiru Koizumi, Ryoma Hoshi

Second Execution: Mondo Owada, Peko Pekoyama, Kirumi Tojo (Here)

Third Murder: Kiyotaka Ishimaru and Hifumi Yamada, Ibuki Mioda and Hiyoko Saionji, Angie Yonaga and Tenko Chabashira

Third Execution: Celestia Ludenberg, Mikan Tsumiki, Korekiyo Shinguji

Fourth Murder: Sakura Ogami, Nekomaru Nidai, Miu Iruma

Fourth Execution: To be listed

Fifth Murder: Mukuro Ikusaba, Nagito Komaeda, Kokichi Oma

Fifth Execution: To be listed

Final Execution: To be listed

Top 10 jokes I Thought of About "The White Wizard Zeref"

10. Wow, Sosuke Aizen started a fashion trend

9. Odd, I remember Asakura Hao having a Japanese motif

8. Irene Belserion called said you look impractical

7. Who knew Zeref was a member of the Otsutsuki clan

6. In this form even Heaven Ascension Dio is telling you to tone it down a little

5. I’ve heard of white washing but isn’t this a little extreme?

4. Looks like we found the real white Dragneel

3. I think Rukh Sinbad is gonna to sue somebody

2. Did you just kill Larcade to raid his wardrobe?

1. Well now we know why Sting never uses White drive anymore, it’s ‘cause Zeref swagger jacked it

okay i know this is like…probably a really insignificant nitpick but did they really have to make connie do this weird anime-esque style when drawing aquamarine?? why is the crew so fixated on making this indian girl a weeaboo? first she says itadakimasu with no context at all in winter forecast and now we get this. if anything that anime style would have fit steven far better. im just really frustrated how connie gets all these japanese motifs for no reason but her own cultural background is just straight-up ignored or, in that one instance where priyanka’s photo is shown in her house, used as a barely noticeable prop for brownie points if a dedicated fan just happens to notice and zoom in on it.

(Spoiler Alert) Danganronpa Third Execution Headshots

“Well then…take care, everyone. Perhaps, we’ll meet again, in another life.”

Game: Danganronpa - Trigger Happy Havoc

Executed: Taeko Yasuhiro / Celestia Ludenberg

Title: Ultimate Gambler

Execution: “The Burning Of The Versailles Witch”

Execution Motif: Medieval Witch Trials

Cause Of Death: 1st Thermal Degree Burns and Vehicle Collision

“So it’s over. It’s really…Now I can go to my beloved who always forgives me…! I can finally see them! Please forgive me, the one who’s going to die with the hope of finally seeing you!”

Game: Danganronpa 2 - Goodbye Despair

Executed: Mikan Tsumiki

Title: Ultimate Nurse

Execution: “Bye Bye Ouchies”

Execution Motif: Real Life Capital Punishment - Lethal Injection

Cause Of Death: Lethal Injection Overdose and Space Exposure

“I will watch you in the afterlife…..”

Game: Danganronpa V3 - Killing Harmony

Executed: Korekiyo Shinguji

Title: Ultimate Anthropologist

Execution: “Picture Scrolls Of Punishment Past And Present”

Execution Motif: Japanese History

Cause Of Death: Severe Thermal 3rd Degree Burns and Spiritual Banishment


First Murder: Sayaka Maizono, Ultimate Imposter, Rantaro Amami

First Execution: Leon Kuwata, Teruteru Hanamura, Kaede Akamatsu

Second Murder: Chihiro Fujisaki, Mahiru Koizumi, Ryoma Hoshi

Second Execution: Mondo Owada, Peko Pekoyama, Kirumi Tojo

Third Murder: Kiyotaka Ishimaru and Hifumi Yamada, Ibuki Mioda and Hiyoko Saionji, Angie Yonaga and Tenko Chabashira

Third Execution: Celestia Ludenberg, Mikan Tsumiki, Korekiyo Shinguji (Here)

Fourth Murder: Sakura Ogami, Nekomaru Nidai, Miu Iruma

Fourth Execution: To be listed

Fifth Murder: Mukuro Ikusaba, Nagito Komaeda, Kokichi Oma

Fifth Execution: To be listed

Final Execution: To be listed


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Danganronpa Murders from 1st to 3rd

flickr

Shi-Shi and Peony Kimono 1930s by Blue Ruin 1

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />Maiko (apprentice geisha) Fukiko wearing a fabulous shibori (tie-dyed) kimono decorated with applique and embroidery in the form of shi-shi (lion dogs) playing amid botan (tree peonies). 

Although it is not obvious from this postcard, another image shows that Fukiko has her hair dressed in the sakkou hairstyle, indicating that she is in the final stage of her apprenticeship and will become a geiko (geisha) in the next few weeks.

Oh, I wish you could swim

Like dolphins, like dolphins can swim

Did you ever wonder why exactly David Bowie has a dolphin tattooed to his calf?

Okay, even if you didn’t, here’s some educational stuff that I read and found beyond interesting and romantic. As it turns out, David Bowie read the short-story that’s pictured above back in the Seventies. In 2001, he wrote:

I thought it a magical and beautiful love story and in part had inspired my song “Heroes”. It tells of a twenty-two-year-old Italian boy, Camara, who has been stationed on the coast of Somalia at the end of the Second World War. One sweltering night brings the exhausted and beaten beauty Shambowa to his hut. She has escaped capture from a group of raiders who had intended to offer her to the slave-markets beyond the sea. Camara tends to her cuts and bruises and they quickly fall in love. At night, after making love, they would swim by the light of the moon, then, once again, lie together on the beach.

Shambowa reveals that she swims as if born and nurtured in the sea, catching fish withh her hands. She swims with the sharks yet does not get torn to pieces. She slyly jokes that the sharks are her “uncles”. One night a dolphin joins their swim, Shambowa excitedly claiming it to be a childhood companion whom she has not seen for many years.

Over the days and weeks that follow, the dolphin appears regularly to play and swim with Shambowa, sometimes even following the little dinghy that the boy uses for fishing. Then, seemingly from nowhere, Shambowa becomes ill with fever. There is little that the Italian boy can do in this isolated place and he has not the slightest doubt that Shambowa is dying. In the late evening, she passes away. That night, she appears in his dreams, shouting and clapping her hands so loudly that he awakes with a start.

He runs from his shack to the beach and finds the dolphin dragging its huge body onto the sand. Cut and bleeding, its dorsal fin in shreds, petrels and gulls are already swooping savagely for the daintest pieces. Though defending it as best he can, the poor creature dies halfway between the sea and the little shack. Camara digs a grave next to the one he had dug for Shambowa and buries the dolphin there, next to its lifelong friend, as though the dolphin’s destiny was somehow bound to Shambowa and the corpse could not just be thrown back into the sea.

While still living in Berlin, Bowie himself received the offering of portaying a young man in the film adaptation… of said story. Having read the piece and knowing that much of it consisted of Camara’s thought process, an adequate realization of the project seemed impossible.

For some years, he simply forgot about it.

Then, in the spring of 1991, Iman (who was living with Bowie since a few months at this point), received a script from her film agent.

“I’ve been asked to play, surprise, surprise, a Somali girl and they want you to play the European who falls in love with her. It’s the most beautiful story”, she said, “But not a movie, I don’t think.”

It was a screenplay, based on an obscure short story called “A Grave for a Dolphin”.

Things like that happen to us all the time. Incredible coincidences. Mystical, I bet.


In 1992, while being on tour in Japan, Bowie got the serenity prayer and a dolphin tattoed on the back of his lower leg, by a traditional Japanese tattoo artist. (The motif also contains a figure riding the dolphin and holding a frog in her hand, because according to Iman, David discovered that at every important event in their life as a couple, a frog was there.)

And, just for the fluff, here’s David Bowie being romantic a.f.

I’m glad our story doesn’t follow the one penned by the Duke. We love the dark velvet sky and the moon that throws streaks of gold onto the deep silver sea. We want to swim side by side for as long as we’ve been given, till one of us slips under the waves for the final time.

Antique kimono.  Yuzen-painted Kimono. Meiji period (1868-1911), Japan.  A silk hitoe (unlined) summer kimono featuring yuzen-dyed fan and shaded bamboo motifs. Red, yellow, green and blue fans are the predominant motif. The Japanese believe that the handle of the fan symbolizes the beginning of life and the bamboo ribs are for the roads of life going out in all directions. Moreover, the action of opening a fan is an auspicious omen for the ‘unfolding’ of the future. As for the bamboo motifs, their evergreen leaves connote 'constancy’, the evenly-spread nodes signify 'moderation’, and its bending in the wind implies 'moral resilience’. Additionally, there are subtle 'yabane’ (arrow feather) motifs that are embroidered at 45 degree angles: these motifs were created utilizing stiff and shiny metallic and black 'urushi’ (lacquered) threads. The design of this kimono is unusual: the dual-colored fans coming out at an angle from the narrow white line bamboo stalks – the total effect is striking, one that both respects tradition, as well as possessing a rather 'modern’ graphic design.  The Kimono Gallery

Click image for 1000 x 1305 size.

Coloured lithograph. 34,4 cm x 24,5 cm.

“Evenpoel’s posters combined the extreme details of Japanese art with French motifs.”

Scanned and quoted from the book “Art Nouveau” by Gabriele Fahr-Becker.

Henri-Jacques-Edouard Evenepoel (1872 - 1899) was a Belgian artist whose most important works are associated with Fauvism.

Henri Evenepoel, To the Marketplace, 1897.

Meisen Kimono.  Early Showa period (1927-1939), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. An unlined meisen silk summer kimono featuring repeating wave and thistle motifs. The thistle is a rare motif in Japanese art, and the it is uncertain whether its presence here was meant to be decorative or auspicious. The alternating blue and white wave motifs - the main theme on this summer kimono - are of a type halfway between abstract “sei-gai-ha” ones with their concentric semicircles, and the realistic ones such as created on the woodblock print “The Great wave of Kanagawa” by the artist Hokusai. of Waves and spray, called “araumi”. are accomplished here in the simplest of ways. The wave has been a favorite motif among Japanese artists for centuries, perhaps because the island of Japan in a huge sea, and because of the Japanese love of nature and the forces within it.