japanese german

you’re working in a field you genuinely enjoy. you have supportive, loving friends. you follow your passions, you’re fluent in your target languages. the 12 new books you ordered will arrive soon. your flat is cozy, decorated with plants and fairy lights. you’re happy. this might seem like some fantasty, but i know this will happen. i believe in you, and you should as well.

language learning made easy

I’ve summarized professor  Alexander Arguelles’ video, because I think this is crucial for language learning. 

There is no magic trick that will help you become fluent in 1 month, but there are very effective approaches to learning a new language and if you combine them, you will surely become fluent.

If you’re learning a new language, the most important thing you need to consider is – what type of language learner are you? 


1. If you:

  • have a more deductive approach, which means that you’re better at listening to and observing the language first and learning through that, rather than starting with plain grammar points from a textbook
  • have a fair degree of intuition
  • like to observe a phenomenon
  • feel somewhat comfortable with ambiguity for a while, until things become clear
  • are someone who can feel comfortable being corrected when they realize they were wrong, rather than getting confused and frustrated because they went down an initial path that turned out not to be correct (so you actually learn from being corrected and you don’t get confused by it)

then, these manuals are best suited for you: the Assimil Language Series, the Linguaphone Series, the Cortina Methods.


2. If you:

  • have a desire to have things explained to you beforehand in a nice and clear way
  • have a logical and analytical mind (which is usually the product of education in general)
  • have a need for a systematic approach (basically if you’re most comfortable with a book which is going to introduce the grammar according to an agreed set of methods or an organized plan)

then, you should try out some of these manuals: the Hugo Series, the Made Simple Series, the Teach Yourself Series, the Buske Series



3. PAY ATTENTION TO PATTERNS!!!

  • the most important part are the patterns of a language
  • no matter what type of language learner you are, I think it’s really clever to incorporate this method into you learning. 
  • a language is actually made up of patterns which constantly repeat themselves and that is THE KEY TO FLUENCY
  • repeating the patterns over and over again, until they become natural, until you no longer have to conjugate the verbs in your head before speaking
  • when you become really good with patterns, your sentences will come out naturally, and patterns are what will get you to fluency




I’ve provided the links, where you will find a review of the books, so that you can have an idea of what they look like. You can find most of these on amazon.

There is also an amazing blog on here, which provides free books, and I think that you can find half of these series for free there.  @lovelybluepanda

concept: I’m able to fluently express myself in a wide range of languages. The eyes of native speakers lighten up when they hear me speak their language, complimenting me on my skills. I have now access to culture and people in a way I never had before.

This summer if you have the time off maybe try picking up a completely new language! The challenge lasts for however long your summer break lasts and you;

1) pick a completely new language you’ve never studied before

2) make a realistic goal for what you want to achieve out of this time (e.g. reading a beginning book in your target language, maybe having a short conversation with a native/advanced speaker, finishing a Duolingo tree etc)

3) commit to practicing it for a allotted time everyday (it could be 20 minutes to 2hrs everyday what matters is that you stick w/ it!)

4) immerse yourself in that language; listen to music and podcasts, watch movies and tv in your target language, change your tech to the target language-really surround yourself w/ the language

If you decide to take on this challenge make an intro post describing;

  •  who you are
  •  your target language
  • why you are choosing that language
  • what your goal is
  • how long you have for break/summer
  • tag it with #summer language challenge

Then every week

  • post abt something related to your target language (e.g. good movie you watched, cool words, accomplishments you made, vocab you learned etc)
  • post something in your target language (it can be anything)
  • progress on your goal(s)
  • tag it with #summer language challenge

At the end of your break make a post abt how you did. Hopefully you’ll have exceeded your expectations and gotten a solid foundation in your target language while having a series of posts that document your journey!

The Nightmare Before Christmas: This is Halloween Multilingual

English

French

Spanish (LA)

Spanish (EUR)

Polish

Originally posted by disneyparks

Italian

Arabic

German

Russian

Hungarian

Originally posted by jack-skellington-motherfuckers

Portuguese (BR)

German

Japanese

Korean

Persian

Originally posted by horrorandhalloween

Thai

Dutch

Slovak

ASL

To everyone learning a language, who is getting frustrated and impatient and maybe even thinking of quitting: remember how far you have come (not how far you have to go), remember why you started and remember how fantastic the end product will be. Learning a language is difficult and the journey can be long but it is rewarding and it opens so many doors. You are capable of doing this, you can do this… don’t quit now

HOW TO STUDY/LEARN ANY LANGUAGE

Being a polyglot, I decided to make a post about how to study any language, Without further ado, here it is:

1) TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM ENGLISH

This is the most crucial step to studying/learning a new language. In order for your brain to pick up the new words and ideas, it needs to be more immersed in the language you’re learning. Now for most of us who are learning languages in school, that’s kind of hard, especially since most language classes do most of the work in English until you build a level of fluency. This is the primary reason why immersion programs or immersion schools are so much more successful in teaching a language: you’re forced to talk, write, speak, and think in the language you’re learning. Your brain makes connections faster and thus learns faster to understand and process the language. I would suggest that when you’re learning the language, whether it’s in class time or homework, try to work only in that language. Don’t automatically translate things into English because that’s only going to inhibit your process. Even if your knowledge of the language is limited, practicing thinking in the language, reading the language without translating, and speaking will greatly improve your progress. You’ll find yourself become more fluent and the language will flow rather than be halting because your brain is trying to translate things instead of thinking fluently.

2) LEARN AS MUCH VOCABULARY AS YOU CAN

Vocab is one of, if not the, most important aspect of learning a language. I would even go as far as saying it’s about 70-80% of effectively knowing a language. Think about it this way, if you’re at a restaurant and you’re asked to read the menu or if you’re out and you’re reading signs and advertisements, will knowing hundreds of verbs and their conjugations help you get by? Most likely not. Vocab on the other hand will make the difference between understanding and being totally clueless. If that example didn’t do it for you here’s another one: when you’re speaking to someone how can you express yourself if you don’t know the words? Chances are even if you know no grammar but know key words in the language someone will understand you. Most people don’t pay that much attention to grammar anyway when you’re speaking. As long as you have a basic understanding of it, you’ll be understood. I’m not saying that grammar isn’t important, far from it, but so many people underestimate vocab and focus on grammar and that hinders your learning. Try to learn as much vocab as you can because it will bring you one more step to being fluent. The key to knowing a language is to understand it to a high degree. You can’t understand if you don’t know the words. Find a list with the most common words in the language you’re learning and try to learn them all. Have a goal to learn 10-20 new words per day and you’ll go a long way. If you’re trying to learn vocab I would recommend to have a sheet with all the words you’re trying to learn and their definitions. Hide the words and try to write the vocab by seeing only the definitions. Writing down helps you remember and this method is foolproof. I’ve used it for 6+ years in French and it’s never failed me.

3) LEARN BASIC GRAMMAR

When I say basic grammar, I mean the typical verb tenses and some basic structures. This doesn’t mean learning every single verb conjugated in every single tense, but rather learning the patterns of grammar and how to apply them. Work smarter not harder. Learning the patterns makes it easier to recognize them when you’re reading and remember them when you’re writing. In my opinion, one fault with the way languages are taught in school is the way they teach grammar and how much time they spend on it. Most native speakers don’t worry as much about grammar as non-native speakers do. Again, I’m not saying grammar isn’t important because it is and  you have to know it, but the way it’s taught ruins it. Try to make a chart with all the verb tenses and the patterns that go with the different types of verbs and then a list with the irregular verbs/exceptions. This should be enough to help you gain a basic mastery of grammar. If you know the basic rules, it will become second nature as you speak, write, and read more.

4) READ, LISTEN, AND SPEAK

The language you learn at school is very very different from the language actually spoken in its native country. Most of the language you learn is very formal while in real life, formality is disregarded to a degree and slang is prevalent. In order to build a fluency, you need to read and listen to the language in its natural form to pick up the slang and words that are actually used and not the archaic words that nobody ever says. Listen to music from that language, watch the news in that language, read a book or magazine in that language etc. This will again help your brain learn and process the language better. It will also help with vocabulary and general understanding. Children’s books are the best when you’re starting out. The language is simple and the grammar isn’t to complicated. Start with children’s books and then work your way up to novels and other forms of literature. Listening to the language is also crucial. Try to find mediums where the language is spoken and just listen. Don’t translate or stress yourself out trying to understand it all because you won’t the first couple of times. Just let it sink in. Gradually, you’ll find yourself understanding more and more and you’ll improve. With the speaking aspect, speak as much as you can. Don’t be embarrassed if you stumble, can’t express yourself as much as you would like, or have an accent. I also find that watching/reading/listening to translated works is helpful. Find your favorite book and read it in the language you’re learning, it will help you understand and learn more because you already know what’s going on and can focus on the vocab and grammar. Find your favorite movie and watch it in the language you’re learning. Again, it will help you learn more vocab. The more you practice the better it will get. If you distance yourself from speaking you’ll never improve. Balancing reading, listening, and speaking is the key to being successful.

5) DON’T BE AFRAID TO MESS UP

Nobody becomes fluent over night. Cliche but true. Don’t expect to instantly know everything. It’s normal to struggle and have trouble. Failing is part of the learning process and if you stop practicing because you’re afraid, you’re never going to learn anything. Let go of your fears and insecurities and go for it. If you fall down, pick yourself up and start again. Don’t be embarrassed if you mess up but rather learn from your mistakes and grow. The things we remember most are usually the things where we’ve messed up or had a negative experience with. So use the hiccups as a learning experience and your language skills will improve. 

If you follow these steps, I’m confided that you’ll be better in no time :) The key is to enjoy what you do and have fun! Good luck!

Top 5 Favorite songs in different languages

Here are some of my favorite songs in some languages I love, let me know about yours!

English:

Desert rose – Sting          
Hotel California – Eagles                              
Wind of change – Scorpions
Machines – Crown the empire
Surrender – Bruce Springsteen

French:

Caravane – Raphaël                        
J’ai demandé à la lune – Indochine          
Jeunesse lève-toi – Saez              
Les lumières dans la plaine – Mickey 3D                
J’temmène au vent – Louise Attaque

Spanish:

Despacito – Luis Fonsi
El mismo sol – Alvaro Soler
Reggaetón lento – CNCO              
Enamorate – Dvicio  
Subeme la radio – Enrique Iglesias

Portuguese:

Amar pelos dois – Salvador Sobral          
Ninguém é de ferro – Wesley Safadao  
Samba do Brasil – Bellini
Você partiu meu coração– Nego do Borel, Anitta            
Nao se passa nada - Piruka

Greek:

De fevgo – Michalis Hatzigiannis              
Kati Dynato - Michalis Hatzigiannis
Nihta ki alli nihta – Giorgos Sabanis        
Ligo akoma – Thanos Petrelis
Thelo na me nioseis – Nikos Vertis

Italian:

Con te partiro – Andrea Bocelli  
Vivo per lei – Andrea Bocelli      
Occidentali’s Karma – Francesco Gabbani            
Vietato Morire – Ermal Meta
Ti amo – Umberto Tozzi

A few other languages:

Japanese:          
We are - One ok rock    
I was king – One ok rock              

Korean:
Not today – Bangtan Boys           
Spring day – Bangtan Boys

Yemenite Arabic:            
Habib Galbi – A-WA

German:              
Feuerwerk – Wincent Weiss      
Nur ein Herzschlag entfernt – Wincent Weiss
Ist da jemand – Adel Tawil

Turkish:              
Küsme Aşka – Oğuzhan Koç

Spotify Playlists

Music is a great way to practice your target language, I listen to music a lot when working or translating; There have been times I study new vocab and get to recognize some words thanks to music. I wanted to share with you some of the playlists I listen to.

Now then, Lyrics are also a great help when learning a language, I suggest “Spotify Lyrics”, it’s free to download at syncs with Spotify;  lyrics won’t show up sometimes (It depends on how popular is the song you are playing)
Download: https://github.com/fr31/spotifylyrics

Spanish (Spain):

 https://open.spotify.com/user/1277540242/playlist/0SCnpfCXfOudgambwaToKb

Spanish (Latinoamerica):

 https://open.spotify.com/user/filtr.pt/playlist/0e51Q4fsXBCkI1wrZfCkKs

French:

 https://open.spotify.com/user/alexandrasavior_official/playlist/5fqG9yLtUHjmXEcUSrSw5Q

German: 

https://open.spotify.com/user/12147752347/playlist/5NUUIzrDVoZWbjDIrD9D5t

Japanese:

https://open.spotify.com/user/1280834311/playlist/4bhzKJQ77vmmrisepRGno5

Chinese: 
https://open.spotify.com/user/1280834311/playlist/5I2now82EEnkhWONQwo6q4

That’s it for me, please feel free to add your playlists so we can share new music and practice our target languages!!  

set small goals for yourself! you don’t need to be fluent right away, or graduate with straight As. it’s way better to have smaller goals, like “get an A on this test” or “use memrise every day for a month” - it’s so important not to overwhelm yourself, which can harm your motivation a lot. same goes for having a (study) blog, just set yourself some small milestones, instead of having one huge aspiration that seems impossible to achieve.

LANGUAGE LEARNING TIP

I have been watching television/listening to music in my target lang as part of my immersion™ and I have found that, instead of focusing really hard on hearing a couple of words I know, it’s better to just relax and let the words flow.

For me, it’s a really hard habit to break. But if you just try it, you will start to hear words and phrases that you know and you aren’t missing further info that you would have if you were still stuck trying to translate the word you recognise. You will find that as time passes, the words will translate almost automatically.

Don’t focus. Just watch/listen. Like you do in your native lang.

Using Buzzfeed for Reading Practice

I just recently found out that Buzzfeed has different websites for different countries, WHICH ALSO MEANS THAT THERE’S TONS OF READING MATERIAL IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES! This is really really good for reading practice, since the articles are short, the genre is familiar, and the topics are relevant and interesting. At the moment, there are only 6 languages available (including English).

Brazilian Portuguese

English (US) / English (UK) / English (AU) / English (CA)

French

German

Japanese

Spanish / Buzzfeed Spain / Spanish (Mexico)

HAVE FUN!

Since I’m a huge fan of both Disney and languages I thought that this sort of list is not only fun but also quite helpful and might be useful while learning :)

Cantonese

Croatian

Danish

Dutch

English (Auli'i Cravalho/Alessia Cara)

Finnish

French

German

Greek

Hebrew

Hungarian

Icelandic

Indonesian

Italian

Japanese

Korean

Malay

Mandarin (Mainland/Taiwan)

Norwegian

Polish

Portugese (Brazilian/Portugese)

Russian

Serbian

Spanish (Castillan/Latin)

Swedish

Thai

Vietnamese

Bonus: 24 languages version  that actually inspired me to make this post