japan nuclear disaster

Many of the evacuees would have to contend with high radiation if they returned to their homes near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, but the government is forcing them to go back by withdrawing housing assistance – that’s tantamount to a crime. The government is playing down the effects of radiation exposure … Yet people who don’t return to places like Koriyama after this month will be left to fend for themselves. They will become internally displaced people. We feel like we’ve been abandoned by our government.
—  Noriko Matsumoto. 60,000 people initially fled from areas near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. As of February, 2017, almost 80,000 were still displaced.

Back in the Atomic Age, the Marshall Islands served as America’s nuclear playground, because you can only explode so much in your own backyard before there ain’t no backyard left to explode. In all, the Pacific Proving Ground hosted 67 nuclear blasts, which produced at least 110,000 cubic yards of lethal nuclear debris, as well as soil which could only be considered fertile if the crop you’re raising is Fallout bosses. Thankfully, the U.S. disposed of all that in a safe and conscientious manner.

Nope, we just left it right there on Enewetak Atoll, though we did have the common decency to cover it up with something that looks like a football stadium, as is the American way. The massive concrete cap is known as the Runit Dome, though the slightly irradiated locals more accurately refer to it as the Tomb.

This was only a stopgap measure, of course, meant to keep the problem out of sight and mind until a more permanent solution could be settled upon. The more permanent solution settled upon was “not caring anymore,” so we left.

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Fukushima mutant daisies: Deformed flowers spotted at Japan's disaster site

Photographs of deformed daisies are doing the rounds in cyberspace, four years after the deadly Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

The white flowers are claimed to be the latest in the long-list of victims, which have experienced deformation over nuclear disasters.

The images of the deformed flowers were posted by Twitter user @San_kaido from Nasushiobara city, located about 110kms from Fukushima.

The tweet the user posted read: “The right one grew up, split into 2 stems to have 2 flowers connected each other, having 4 stems of flower tied belt-like. The left one has 4 stems grew up to be tied to each other and it had the ring-shaped flower. The atmospheric dose is 0.5 μSv/h at 1m above the ground.”

According to gardening experts the abnormal growth that distorts the heads of daisies and other wildflowers is caused by hormonal imbalance. Called fasciation (or cresting) is a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in vascular plants. Fasciation may cause plant parts to increase in weight and volume.

In March 2011, there was a meltdown in three of Fukushima’s six nuclear reactors due to the devastating tsunami which struck the region. Japan continues to grapple with the scale of the disaster. Earlier, reports said some fruits and vegetables became mutated after the nuclear leak got mixed with ground water.

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