jane is so tired and lisbon knows it

8

Today’s rewatch episode is a special one for me and stands out as one of my most favorite Jisbon-centric episodes in a Jisbon-centric season. I loved it instantly when I watched it, from beginning to end.

I enjoy Lisbon and Jane planning things together, sharing the same space every day both at work and in their lovetruck – and never getting tired of each other’s company, quite on the contrary, they are genuinely enjoying every minute together. And them sharing such a cramped place as the Airstream is a vivid illustration, they need this closeness.

And it is paralleled by how much closer they are becoming every time as they share things that have been with them for years, voicing something so deeply personal because they feel the comfort to do so, their trust to each other is superior to any fears. When Lisbon gives Jane his cup, she lets him know at once that she never in her mind moved on, though she was forcing herself to move on with another man. That she kept the cup for two years having no hope of seeing Jane again, that she was attached to it as a reminder of him because it kept his warmth, and that she wanted it put together again because seeing it broken had probably meant feeling that Jane was broken too, beyond repair, hopeless, and she didn’t want that for him. Putting the pieces back together was for her a gesture of hope, of a possibility for both of them to be mended somehow. And keeping the cup was having part of what they’d shared with her, and also a symbol of her care, deep worry for him and unconditional love. Giving it back to him, she lets him know about all of that. And there is a picture on the box, and I can see not only a heart but also two swans, symbolic for them. It’s a profound manifestation of love and it’s plain to see how the understanding of it washes over Jane like a wave, and he’s surprised, he’s touched and moved so deeply, it’s hard for him to speak.

And in admitting that he has no idea what the gift is, Jane also opens up a bit more to Lisbon, lets her know that he can be at a loss when trying to read her, that his psychic skills don’t work with her and that she disempowers him and, what is very important, it’s okay for him. He likes being surprised by her, he enjoys the thrill of waiting, he doesn’t want to know what’s next or have a rational plan or know what lies ten moves ahead. And he values her sincerity. His “thank you” embraces everything, the times he wanted to tell Teresa how grateful he was but couldn’t or didn’t, a simple expression of something profound and overwhelming and also something that gives them both confidence.