jack-schmitt

Apollo 17 Enters Lunar Orbit (10 Dec. 1972) — The crescent Earth rises above the lunar horizon in this photograph taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar orbit during National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “America” in lunar orbit.

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Apollo 17 Re-Docks with the Command Module (14 Dec. 1972) — In this view, taken from the Lunar Module (LM), the Command and Service Module (CSM) are seen preparing to rendezvous with the LM. Note the reflection of the lunar surface on the CSM. The CSM, is piloted by Ronald E. Evans; while astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander; and Harrison W. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, are onboard the LM, following their extravehicular activities (EVA) on the moon’s surface. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the LM “Challenger” to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon, astronaut Evans remained with the CSM “America” in lunar orbit.

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Adrien Brody at the 75th Academy Awards, 2003.

Surprise, surprise! Adrien Brody who was kind of the underdog that year won the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance in Roman Polanski’s The Pianist (2002), beating out runner-ups Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York) and Jack Nicholson (About Schmitt).

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Humanity’s first era of Lunar exploration came to a close on this day in 1972, as the crew of Apollo 17 blasted off from the lunar surface. The crew would return to Earth on December 19. 

Spending nearly three days in the Taurus-Littrow valley, Jack Schmitt and Gene Cernan collected 264 pounds of rocks and soil over 22 hours of moonwalking. 

Schmitt, as Lunar Module Pilot, was the only professional scientist to walk on the Moon, whereas all other Apollo astronauts were pilots with geology training.

Seen in the third image above, Schmitt photographed the landing site shortly before closing the hatch on the Lunar module prior to takeoff. 

Many of the Lunar Rover’s tracks can be clearly identified with the orbital imagery taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter more than 40 years later in 2009.

P/C: NASA. Gifs: Age of Destruction.

(13 Dec. 1972) — The Apollo 17 Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is photographed near a large lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. About half of the boulder is captured in this scene, photographed by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander. While astronauts Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” to explore the lunar surface, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.