jack thornell

USA. Mississippi. Hernando. Summer of 1966. Civil rights activist James Meredith grimaces in pain as he pulls himself across Highway 51 after being shot. Meredith was leading the March Against Fear to encourage African Americans to vote when he was shot. He completed the march from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi, after his wounds were treated. 

This picture won the Pulitzer Prize for Photography in 1967.

Photograph: Jack Thornell

Jack Thornell. James Meredith, wounded by a shotgun blast, sprawled on a highway near Hernando, Mississippi, June 6, 1966.

26-year-old Associated Press photographer Jack Thornell famously captured this Pulitzer Prize-winning image of James Meredith, the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi, after he was wounded by a sniper while leading a march to encourage African Americans to vote. When the attack happened, Thornell was sitting in his car waiting for a photographer from 

Life to bring him a Coke; he took two rolls of pictures of Meredith, but never put down his camera to offer his wounded subject help.

Jack Thornell. James Meredith, wounded by a shotgun blast, sprawled on a highway near Hernando, Mississippi, June 6, 1966.

26-year-old Associated Press photographer Jack Thornell famously captured this Pulitzer Prize-winning image of James Meredith, the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi, after he was wounded by a sniper while leading a march to encourage African Americans to vote. When the attack happened, Thornell was sitting in hid car waiting for a photographer from Life to bring him a Coke; he took two rolls of pictures of Meredith, but never put down his camera to offer his wounded subject help.

Last night, in the 21st hour, I posted a photograph taken by Jack Thornell, a photo-journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize for capturing the image of James Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the segregated University of Mississippi being shot by a “sniper.” This photograph seemed to have raised some very important issues for many regarding racism and job responsibility.


The same photograph has also reignited a harsh undertone in light of  several recent incidents from around the world (more recently in our very own backyard) that straddle the line of personal afflictions and the bigger picture. Many teeter the line and fall unto the side of the fence that they feel most comfortable without really thinking of the logistics of right versus wrong. However, regardless as to which side of the fence you may fall, the biggest concern is the lack of human compassion, no matter the skin color or the bylaws set forth by a professional occupation.

Humanity. We are human before we are black or white and rich or poor. And yes, this comes from a woman that proudly accepts her culture, displaying it vividly and in living color on her blog but it is not without compassion for those around her. 

This incident happened in 1966 and here we are in 2012. It is time to get back to the basics or we will forever remain a world divided.

With the commentary that I’ve been reading, I can see that this has caused a bit of a ruckus since last night but I think my job is just beginning….. 

#History