j. paul getty trust

Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946-1989)
Lisa Lyon
1981
Gelatin silver print
45.1 x 35 cm (17 ¾ x 13 ¾ in.)
Promised Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

The Leatoli Footprints and Early Human Ancestors

In 1978 a team led by British paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey found trace fossils of animal footprints left in ash several million years old.  Searching further, Leakey’s team found the oldest trace fossils of early hominids in Leatoli, about 30 miles south of the famed Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania.  The footprints are though to come from three individuals from the australopithecus afarensis family.  Like the pithecanthropus (see recent post here), the australopithecus was named under the assumption that it represented a missing link between humans and primates.  The name australopithecus comes from the Latin word australis meaning south and the Ancient Greek word pithekos meaning ape.  The name was given that same year by Donald Wilson and Tim White, who found fragments two thousand miles north of the Leatoli site in the Afar region of Ethiopia, hence afarensis.

Happy Birthday, Mary Leakey, born on this day, February 6, 1913.

Shout out to my little man, Rowan, another Ethiopian treasure!

Photo via J. Paul Getty Trust, copyright 1995.

4

“Maria Frederike van Reede-Athlone at seven”, 1755-56, Jean-Étienne Liotard, The J. Paul Getty Trust.

When I was young (about 12 or 13 years old) the only art medium I actually liked to use was pastel, it was hard as hell and anything could fuck up your weeks work, but I loved it; so you can understand that Degas and Liotard were my gods and masters. Now my shit is watercolour and ink, but pastel has always been near my heart (you don’t know how long I’ve stood in front Degas’ pastels in the Met, hint: A LOT).

But Liotard is something else. His level of mastership with pastel is marvelous (it’s almost disturbing that level of skill), even though it is very hard (and subtle and delicate and very easy to fuck up) it was his prefered medium for drawing children portraits (remember his portraits of Marie Antoinette and her siblings?) because he could draw quick, could interrupt as many times as was needed and had no odor.

Maria Frederike was the daughter of an aristocratic Dutch family and in the 18th century the demand of children portraits increased thanks to the rise of the middle class. And, let me tell you, WHAT A PORTRAIT HE MADE: you can almost touch the velvet of her cape, the ermine fur, her very well brushed hair, the stiff silk ribbon bow on her hair, the white lace and the black soft dog. OMFG THE DOG.

The Leatoli Footprints and Early Human Ancestors

In 1978 a team led by British paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey found trace fossils of animal footprints left in ash several million years old.  Searching further, Leakey’s team found the oldest trace fossils of early hominids in Leatoli, about 30 miles south of the famed Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania.  The footprints are though to come from three individuals from the australopithecus afarensis family.  Like the pithecanthropus (see recent post here), the australopithecus was named under the assumption that it represented a missing link between humans and primates.  The name australopithecus comes from the Latin word australis meaning south and the Ancient Greek word pithekos meaning ape.  The name was given that same year by Donald Wilson and Tim White, who found fragments two thousand miles north of the Leatoli site in the Afar region of Ethiopia, hence afarensis

Happy Birthday, Mary Leakey, born on this day, February 6, 1913.

Shout out to my little man, Rowan, another Ethiopian treasure! 

Photo via J. Paul Getty Trust, copyright 1995.

artnt.cm
At MoMA, Yves Klein's Other Leaps? - artnet News
THE DAILY PIC: Photographers Shunk-Kender shot many versions of Klein's fake jump.

Happy Leap Day! Learn how artist Yves Klein worked with photographers Harry Shunk and János Kender to stage his infamous photo Leap into the Void.

[Yves Klein with Harry Shunk, János Kender. Leap into the Void. 1960. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Photograph: Shunk-Kender © J. Paul Getty Trust. The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles]