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We’re thrilled to reveal the first of this year’s Webby Sessions taking place at Internet Week New York! 

The Webby Sessions are a series of panels and discussions touching on the latest Internet trends and inspirations specially curated by us. Each day, we will bring you thought-provoking content and leaders representing the very best of the web.

The first Webby Session is taking place on Monday, May 20 at 11am and will feature the incredibly popular, engaging, uplifting, and Webby Winning photo blog Humans of New York.

Photographer Brandon Stanton will join Webby Executive Director, David-Michel Davies to discuss the Internet’s ability to foster altruism and build supportive community along with sharing the meteoric rise of his blog over the past couple of years. 

We look forward to sharing ideas from some of our most inspiring Webby winners, judges, and friends. 

Join us at Internet Week HQ. Tickets are on sale now

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The official video of Lee’s interview at Internet Week New York is out now. :O)

Watch on tumblr.webbyawards.com

Grace Helbig joined us for this year’s Webby Sessions at Internet Week.

Watch her chat with our Executive Director David-Michel Davies, where she shared the inside scoop on what it’s like to be one of YouTube’s biggest personalities

In case you missed the livestream and wanted to watch just the part with Grace Helbig. Michael Buckley, and Hannah Hart, I put it up on my dropbox.

EDIT 2012-05-17: The clip is finally up on YouTube on What’s Trending’s page here.

A Few Quick Facts About Elio Motors

By Samantha Scott

Here at Internet Week, Elio Motors introduces what could be the new standard for American cars. Providing 84 miles to the gallon and boasting a $6800 price tag, the deal is almost too sweet. Made and manufactured in Shreveport, Louisiana, the company hopes to do their part in replenishing the American job market.

Interested? They’ll be here all week!  

Parsons Design + Technology Senior Thesis projects were on display earlier this month. Below are my favorites from the pieces on display at the Kellen Gallery.

Endangered Sounds
When I think of vignettes of the past being captured, my mind jumps to old photographs. But this project taps into a different sense by memorializing obsolete sounds.

Blime Light
Neat lamp designed from modeling audio of friends gathered in a living space.

The Love Competition
Check out the video of Stanford neuroscientists judging MRI scans of people in love. The thesis project models the brain activity of participants.

Project DesignED
An extra-curricular program to enable professional graphic designers to teach high schoolers the basics of design.

Urban Speed Bumps
“Sidewalk interventions” : guerrilla-style experiences encouraging people to take it easy.

Dontflushme
A network to inform residents about the state of the NYC sewer system. Alerts are sent through means such as Twitter or internet-enabled lightbulbs (white=good, red=bad).

Toloom
An iPad/web interface that mimics a hand loom. Creative Internetters can design realistic patterns to be made by traditional weavers.

Knitztape
Mashup of graphic design, Twitter, and music.

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On May 21st at 8pm JVTMcomedy is hosting, Watch, Reblog, Repeat - A Panel Discussion About Comedy Web Series’!

As a part of Internet Week New York, Johnny Velvet and the Moonbeams welcome producers of New York’s best online comedy content and will be discussing how they create material that people don’t just watch, but also share.

Panelists:
From CollegeHumor
Adam Conover, Paul Briganti

Morgan Evans
The Untitled Webseries That Morgan Evans Is Doing

From PERIODS. Films
Philip Quinaz, Giovanni P Autran, Charlie Porter

Jeremy Redleaf
OddJobNation.com

Nate Williams
Sweet Misery, Actualized, Planet Awesome

When companies know a lot about you, should you be concerned with how they use that information?

In general, I expect that companies offering free services will collect and use data about me. Designers and programmers, servers, those all cost $ - and the company is out to make a profit as well.

At a recent Internet Week panel, I heard confirmation of this sentiment. Laura Salant from About.com said that (to overgeneralize) there is a generational divide. For example, if a company gives a recommendation based on the type of shampoo I use:

  • For those under 40 - I will recognize where the company got this information about me and see how the recommendation is useful.
  • For those over 40 - I will find it creepy.

This didn’t surprise me when I heard it.  What did surprise me was my actual reaction to such an example a week later.

I was on my computer, looking up information about an old game app. On the Google Play webpage about this app, a little green box (shown in the screenshot above) informed me that the app would be compatible with all of my devices. Clicking on the box revealed a list of my devices, namely my tablet and phone:

I was creeped out.

Now why is this? I know that all of my devices are signed in to my Google account. In fact, the integration among my devices and Google services is one of the reasons why I’ve been a loyal Android user. This little green note is also quite useful. I have sometimes been frustrated by searching for an app that I have installed on my phone, but not being able to find it for my tablet.

So why this reaction? Logically, I would think that this shouldn’t bother me at all. Perhaps these sorts of data-driven hints aren’t as common yet (or at least, aren’t as overt when they are used), and it’s just a matter of getting more familiar with the practice.