itooamharvard

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#ITooAmHarvard

#ITooAmHarvard is a project by Black students at Harvard to speak out about the racism that they experience in their daily lives as students. It will also be a play.

Pretty heartbreaking. These beautiful and bright students deserve so much better. Above I included some of the photographs (there’s many more) of Black women who are students there because I think it’s important to point out how racism is not only impacting Whites’ perception of their intelligence but also how White people approach their appearance as well, in gender-specific ways. This is heartbreaking to me albeit not surprising. The myth that working hard = happy payoff is a fairy tale. Racism is ubiquitous. 

I really wish them the best with their education and the ability to navigate these microaggressions and overt acts of racism. This stuff increases stereotype threat and impacts mental health and health which impacts performance. I want the best for them. Much love. ❤

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- @itooamharvard

Those voice above are only two of the many voices that need to be heard. A group of students at Harvard are fed up with the institutional racism they say they have experienced, and are speaking out against it through a commanding photography project here on tumblr : itooamharvard.tumblr.com, both amazing and inspirational and definitely worth a reblog or share. Check them out!

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In the Pittsburgh Public School system, CAS stands for Center for Advanced Studies. In CAS classes students of color are often the minority. As a student of color in CAS, I know that the issue of diversity is rarely addressed and our input to the conversation on race is often unheard. For my long term project this year I decided to start a dialogue about race, and give fellow students of color a way to share their experiences and voice their opinions. This is the Pittsburgh Public High Schools’ expansion of Kimiko Matsuda-Lawrence’s photo campaign I, Too, Am Harvard to show that We, Too, Are CAS.

Huge thanks to everyone who participated!

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#ITooAmOxford

Inspired by the truth and power of #ITooAmHarvard, people of colour who are students at University of Oxford in the U.K. created #ITooAmOxford to speak of their experiences with racism on campus. The photographs are diverse (there’s more on their site) and here I included some of the ones of Black women/women of African descent (my apologies if I misread any genders) as I did when I posted my now viral post on I Too Am Harvard because again it reveals the racist assumptions about both their intelligence and appearance, something I dealt with as a Black woman when I was younger and in undergrad/grad. I also noticed the sense of “place” and nationality that impacts the stereotypes that they face. 

This is a point for the lies about racism being uniquely American to stop. Now. Today. I am tired of weekly emails from Whites ahistorically announcing how racism does not exist in the U.K. It is not their place to make that determination anyway; only Black and other people of colour can. The person who experiences the oppression, not the oppressor, the oppressed, not the privileged, speak truth to the experiences.

These students are speaking their truths. Do not ignore them. Their lives matter. They deserve better than the stress and even physical/mental health issues that dealing with racism can cause. Stereotype threat is real and impacts academic performance and health. 

I wish these students the best. Much love. ❤

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The things that come on my Facebook feed…

How heartbreaking is it now that black students that work their ass off to EARN acceptances into their dream schools are now BLAMED for the isolation and racism they endure?!

I expected all types of backlash for this movement, but not like this…

The complexities and struggle of the black identity is far greater than y’all realize.

Thoughts?

fourscythe  asked:

Have you guys ever heard of I, Too, Am Harvard? It's a campaign highlighting non white people in Harvard, and the things said to them.

I’m the mod who goes to Harvard, so at least one of us has (and has friends/acquaintances participating.) It’s a really amazing and informative campaign that I hope will bring about important dialogue and change.  I’m really glad they’ve gotten so much media attention. 

buzzfeed.com
63 Black Harvard Students Share Their Experiences In A Powerful Photo Project

The “I, Too, Am Harvard” photo campaign explores the diverse experience that black students at Harvard have to face. Here are 21 of the images.

Check out the Tumblr here: http://itooamharvard.tumblr.com/

These are examples of microaggressions. They seem harmless (to the person saying them), but cumulatively, they really hurt!

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In the Pittsburgh Public School system, CAS stands for Center for Advanced Studies. In CAS classes students of color are often the minority. As a student of color in CAS, I know that the issue of diversity is rarely addressed and our input to the conversation on race is often unheard. For my long term project this year I decided to start a dialogue about race, and give fellow students of color a way to share their experiences and voice their opinions. This is the Pittsburgh Public High Schools’ expansion of Kimiko Matsuda-Lawrence’s photo campaign  I, Too, Am Harvard to show that We, Too, Are CAS.

Huge thanks to everyone who participated!

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THE MOST EPIC GOOGLE HANGOUT EVER* is happening TODAY with Dear White People writer/director Justin Simien, #ITooAmHarvard, #BBUM, and the UCLA Black Bruins! Colorlines is moderating and we’re talking all things race and the politics of higher education. 

Getting started at 4pm PST but you can join and start asking questions now: https://plus.google.com/events/coov4rmc6l2c7c33mvigbei87vg

*Still calculating epicness, but it’ll certainly be up there.

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Part PSA, part crowdsourced rebuke, part catalogue of everyday racism, #ITooAmHarvard is the newest social media conversation to pick up on the race dialogue happening around the country on college campuses. Tune into the Twitter conversation and scroll through the Tumblr for a quick tour of the stunning array of ignorant questions and statements these students have heard, as well as the retorts one assumes they’re regularly tempted to say in response. (x)

“There is a feeling a lot of black students share, which is that even though you got a letter of acceptance, you’re never fully accepted on this campus,” Matsuda-Lawrence said.

She added that throughout her 40 interviews, she hardly ever mentioned the affirmative action article, yet almost every person brought it up. “That’s the effect it had on our campus,” she said.

“The administration was silent on the issue,” Matsuda-Lawrence said. “They did not come to the aid of students of color on campus, and the voices of black students were not heard in the affirmative action debate.”

Black College Students Launch Artistic Social Media Campaigns About Race

Black College Students Launch Artistic Social Media Campaigns About Race

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Instead of growing Afros, staging riots or organizing sit-ins, this generation of protesters are crafting witty digital projects to rally themselves.  Back in November, several black students at the University of Michigan launched a social media campaign on Twitter, using the hashtag #BBUM, an acronym for “being black at the University of Michigan,” to describe their unique and often…

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The photos above are from a new project called #itooamharvard which explores racial discrimination amidst ivy league students at Harvard University in Boston. 

This photo project was in reaction to an article, Affirmative Dissatisfaction, published last year in The Harvard Crimson a school publication. I am not saying that Affirmative Action isn’t flawed because I am not sure I understand all the details, but I am certain of the importance of what it represents, which is so clearly lost on the student that wrote this article who is basically saying, “white people are smarter and that’s why we get into these schools, and when minorities get better then they will take their rightful place at Harvard amongst us.” I find the way she trivializes real minorities offensive (why not AA for those with red hair? or short people? or the ugly?), and pretty indicative of the kind of privileged ignorance that doesn’t really understand and therefore doesn’t take seriously the ideas of of racial inequality and how it contributes to itself. Sure Court Supreme Cheif Justice Roberts says, “The way to stop discrimination on the base of race is to stop discriminating on the base of race.” But this statement is inherently flawed. The fact is, there are thousands of qualified minorities who never make it to certain schools not because they’re not smart enough or not ambitious enough, but because they never had the lifestyle afforded to those of a higher income, which unfortunately often times reflects race. 

I usually try and stay away from the comments section, but I was all too curious to see what kind of comments an article on race at one of our top schools had attracted. The first comment from a current Harvard student under the name “BrownAndProud” is thoughtful, and even though there are some overtones of defeat, is hopeful as well. The last paragraph sums up the sentiment really well, 

     "Some day, you’ll come to terms with your anxiety and self-doubt         about being admitted unfairly as a legacy. You’ll decide that you are worthy of what was handed to you and move on to be successful and fulfilled in whatever career you choose- and no one will ever question you because the fact that you were a legacy does not necessarily have to be common knowledge. I will never be able to hide the color of my skin, and I will graduate from here knowing that the stereotypes you threw so lightly around in this Crimson piece are the realities I will face for the rest of my life. I could come to terms with my self-doubt and know that I am equally qualified as any of my peers that now sit beside me in class- but the fact remains that the world will see me as a less qualified doctor, pilot, lawyer, etc. This is most unfair, but we make the best of what we can with what we have and move forward working twice as hard against these stereotypes, and working to dismantle them when people like you continue to perpetuate them.“ 

This comment has numerous encouraging replies, including one from Harvard and 901 likes. I think that people who are a privileged bubble don’t get what inequality means, and this is apparent from the way they talk about it. It’s discouraging to read opinions like in this article, but is very hopeful to see the responses- specifically the photo project, BrownAndProud. It is depressing that even in an Ivy League school students are still met with such racial apprehension. That because they’re black they probably don’t deserve to be at Harvard, or alternatively because they’re at Harvard they aren’t really black. I know that people are more empowered now than ever and have the will to keep proving people wrong, even as discouraging as each prejudicial blow may be. Proving that we do deserve to be on the bus, at the counter, and at this school.  

Regarding The I, Too, Am Harvard Post

The pictures are from a photo campaign that explores the diverse experience that black students at Harvard have to face.as stated by them “Our voices often go unheard on this campus, our experiences are devalued, our presence is questioned” – this project is their way of them speaking back. It was created by sophomore Kimiko Matsuda-Lawrence after she developed a play with the same concept. They have a FB page and I just found their tumblr by the same name.

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I, Too, Am Harvard

The “I, Too, Am Harvard” photo campaign explores the diverse experience that black students at Harvard have to face. Here are 21 of the images.

“The lack of diversity in this classroom does NOT make me the voice of all black people.” My life at #thenewschool. This one made me laugh because I’m the only black person in the class I’m sitting in right now with all these posters up. I don’t think white people understand how annoying it is to be the “black voice.” There’s more black people in the world than white people, so why do I have to speak for all of us? #itooamharvard (at The New School for Social Research)

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