it's the artist not the tools

“why do you use crayola colored pencils and copy paper”

“why do you use ms paint and paint.net”

“why do you draw with a mouse and not a tablet”

“why don’t you use a good digital camera and not your laptop/camera phone”

“stop showing me a picture of an empty wallet”

anonymous asked:

Hi! Is there anywhere you've posted your brush settings? I wanted to check your blog before asking, but my computer didn't let me scroll down so I'm not sure how you keep it organized. Sorry if someone's asked you this before, but I just really love your art and I wanted to see how you do it haha

hey, thank you! i keep all info about brushes, programs, etc. in my FAQ but the brushes needed a big overhaul anyway SO

here’s an updated, more organized list of settings! feat. nichol, amelie, new unnamed OW oc, and dante ;3c

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 Hey guys, i’m opening this commission. To be honest i’m not confident about my art since I get a lot of hate in my artwork ( and I also know that my art is not that good ) BUT I really need money to help my dad with my college so…

 If you’re interested or have any questions please feel free to send me a message on my tumblr or you can email me: lia.harumi@gmail.com 

  • The payment is only via Paypal.
  • The commissions may take about 1 week to finish.
  • I need references or a detailed description. 
  • We can talk about other art styles like cartoon or chibi.

 Thank you so much for your attention. <3

“The Basics”

The basic structure of the sortinghatchats system is that you aren’t just sorted into one House, but into two tiers of Houses: Primary and Secondary. Your Primary House defines WHY you do things. Your Secondary defines HOW. To build this system, we’ve drawn on the Sorting Hat’s songs, general HP canon, extracanonical data (ex. interviews with JKR)… and then extrapolated.

People are complex– for joy or for utility, due to social pressure or careless recreation, people often use the reasoning or methods of Houses that aren’t their Primary or Secondary. We call this “modelling” or “performing” a house and we will explain it in greater detail later. These additional layers help us capture some complexities in characters that we couldn’t get using Primary and Secondary alone. People can vary hugely in how they embody their Houses; in this system, Aang, the heroic pacifist protagonist from Avatar the Last Airbender, shares most of his Houses with HP’s Lord Voldemort.

The way you decide which Houses are yours is not necessarily by looking at what you do, but at what would make you proudest and most content if you were strong enough to do it. Your sorting is what you want to be and what you believe you should do, whether or not you actually live up to it. That’s how people like Peter Pettigrew can end up in Gryffindor.

PRIMARIES

Your Primary is your why. It’s your motivations, your values, and the way you frame the world around you. It’s how and what you prioritize, and what you weigh most heavily when making your decisions. People often also assume that others share those priorities. A common response to our system is “but you must oversort into Gryffindor/Slytherin/Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff–everyone has that type of morality, deep down!”

Gryffindor Primaries trust their moral intuitions and have a need and a drive to live by them. They feel what’s right in their gut, and that matters and guides them. If they don’t listen to and act on that, it feels immoral.

We call Gryffindor morality “felt” but that doesn’t mean they’re all impetuous, emotional hellions. Gryffindors can still be intelligent, deliberate creatures who weigh their decisions and moralities carefully. Reasoning, intellectualizing and debate can be support for a Gryffindor’s felt morality– but those things can never make a fully satisfying morality in themselves. Some things are just wrong, no matter what pretty words you use to explain them.

Ravenclaw Primaries have a constructed system that they test their decisions against before they feel comfortable calling something right. This system might be constructed by them, or it might have been taught to them as children, or it might have been discovered by them some point later in life. But it gives them a way to frame the world and a confidence in their ability to interact with it morally.

Ravenclaws do not lack an intuitive sense of morality or gut feeling about things, but they distrust those instincts and have a need to ignore or to dig down deep and dissect those internal moral impulses. Living within their built moral system is as important to a Ravenclaw as to a Gryffindor; it’s the source of the morality that differs between them–what they trust.

Hufflepuff Primaries value people–all people. They value community, they bond to groups (rather than solely individuals), and they make their decisions off of who is in the most need and who is the most vulnerable and who they can help. They value fairness because every person is a person and feel best when they give everyone that fair chance. Even directly wronged, a Hufflepuff will often give someone a second (or fifth) chance.

This doesn’t mean all Hufflepuffs are inherently tolerant human beings, any more than all Gryffindors are inherently good, moral creatures. Hufflepuffs tend to believe that all people deserve some type of kindness, decency, or consideration from them–but they can define “person” however they want, excluding individuals or even whole groups.

Slytherin Primaries are fiercely loyal to the people they care for most. Slytherin is the place where “you’ll make your real friends”– they prioritize individual loyalties and find their moral core in protecting and caring for the people they are closest to.

Slytherin’s reputation for ambition comes from the visibility of this promotion of the self and their important people– ambition is something you can find in all four Houses; Slytherin’s is just the one that looks most obviously selfish.

Because their morality system of “me and mine first” is fairly narrow in scope, Slytherins often construct a secondary morality system to deal with situations that are not addressed by their loyalty system.

SECONDARIES

Your Secondary is your how. It’s how you approach the world as a person interacting with it, and how you make your way. It’s how you problem-solve. It’s not necessarily what you’re best at, or even what’s the most useful to you, but about what skills and methods you value as being intrinsic to you. Do you improvise, do you plan? Do you work on something a little bit every day? Do you charge into the fray and tell people exactly what’s on your mind? What do you do? How would you describe the way you meet the world?

Note: the term “Secondary” is not meant to imply that how you do things is any less important than why (the Primary House). It’s simply the way our terminology fell out and we’re too lazy to change it. The importance of motivations v. methods is a personal sliding scale– it’s perfectly valid for a person to identify with their Secondary House over their Primary. (When drawing from canonical sources, we assumed each character likely was in a House that matched to either their Primary or their Secondary. For instance, Harry is in Gryffindor for his heroic Gryffindor Primary, but Ginny Weasley is there for her brash and bold Gryffindor Secondary.)

Gryffindor Secondaries charge. They meet the world head-on and challenge it to do its worst. Gryffindor Secondaries are honest, brash, and bold in pursuit of things they care about. Known for their bravery, it is almost a moral matter to stay true to themselves in any situation that they’re in.

Ravenclaw Secondaries plan. They collect information, they strategize. They have tools. They run hypotheticals and try to plan ahead for things that might come up. They build things (of varying degrees of practicality and actual usefulness) that they can use later– whether that’s an emergency supply pack, a vast knowledge of Renaissance artistic techniques and supplies, or a series of lists and contingency plans. They feel less at home in improvisation and more comfortable planning ahead and taking the time to be prepared.

Hufflepuff Secondaries toil. Their strength comes from their consistency and the integrity of their method. They’re our hard workers. They build habits and systems for themselves and accomplish things by keeping at them. They have a steadiness that can make them the lynchpin (though not usually the leader) of a community. While stereotyped as liking people and being kind (and this version is perhaps a common reality), a Hufflepuff secondary can also easily be a caustic, introverted misanthrope who runs on hard work alone.

Slytherin Secondaries improvise. They are the most adaptive secondary, finding their strength in responding quickly to whatever a situation throws at them. They improvise differently than the Gryffindor Secondary, far more likely to try coming at situations from different angles than to try strong-arming them. They might describe themselves as having different “faces” for different people and different situations, dropping them and being just themselves only when they’re relaxing or feel safe.

But the Journey Continues…

These four basic Primary and Secondary houses are summarized starting places that we use as a basis for further discussion. What are some ways this gets complicated?

Keep reading

ok so this file is rEALLY BIG so if u wanted to see the “detail”, there u go

i left out my 2 other actual sketchbooks bc thats a given at this point, and i left out a few pens/tools bc fuck that honestly (and its toootally not bc i forgot them or anything pffft)

buuut yeah! tagged by @kemopaw on instagram & @elvenrain bc they hate me ( TT w TT ) im also gonna tag @michimichi-cocopop bc i want her to suffer muahaha

I finished this a while back but always forgot to upload it. Thanks to my sister Faragon she reminded me to post it haha. This is Kamui (Corrin) and Azura (Aqua) from Fire emblem Fates. Give that game a try its pretty good!

Draw by me: Laundingo (SR)

Tools: Paint tool SAI and my now retired Yiynova dp10hd.

Harry Potter AU headcanons

Hear me out:

Mika and Yuu, both in Slytherin.

And before y’all fill my inbox again, I will explain why:

Taking the @sortinghatchats ‘s system as a guide (because I think it’s the most useful and accurate one I’ve ever read), Yuu fits perfectly into the Slytherin primaries/Griffindor secondaries’ description:

Slytherin Primaries are fiercely loyal to the people they care for most. Slytherin is the place where “you’ll make your real friends”– they prioritize individual loyalties and find their moral core in protecting and caring for the people they are closest to.

Slytherin’s reputation for ambition comes from the visibility of this promotion of the self and their important people– ambition is something you can find in all four Houses; Slytherin’s is just the one that looks most obviously selfish.

Because their morality system of “me and mine first” is fairly narrow in scope, Slytherins often construct a secondary morality system to deal with situations that are not addressed by their loyalty system.

****

Gryffindor Secondaries charge. They meet the world head-on and challenge it to do its worst. Gryffindor Secondaries are honest, brash, and bold in pursuit of things they care about. Known for their bravery, it is almost a moral matter to stay true to themselves in any situation that they’re in.

Meanwhile, I see Mika more as a Slytherin Primary/Ravenclaw Secondary:

Ravenclaw Secondaries plan. They collect information, they strategize. They have tools. They run hypotheticals and try to plan ahead for things that might come up. They build things (of varying degrees of practicality and actual usefulness) that they can use later– whether that’s an emergency supply pack, a vast knowledge of Renaissance artistic techniques and supplies, or a series of lists and contingency plans. They feel less at home in improvisation and more comfortable planning ahead and taking the time to be prepared. 

And that’s basically my opinion on this subject.

anonymous asked:

Medic students are mostly safe in EU. Fearless and focused, with iron in their tools. Silver nitrate and salt drive away more than microbes. Most of them are interested solely in the human body, its processes, its ailments, its healing. Yet, there are always curious ones who would love to study Their anatomy, to see how it works. Some are struggling, desperate, willing to bargain for more time, more rest, more knowledge. They offer trinkets and treasures, perhaps hidden artistic talents.

Students of medical fields are admired, on the whole, although the more completed and technological the art becomes, the more wary of it are the Gentry. It does not take much these days for them to turn on a student who’s too curious about the wrong things.

donniedrinkscoffee-deactivated2  asked:

hi! im hoping to become a storyboard artist but im not sure where to start learning... any tips? love your art btw💕

Hi! Thank you!

First of all I’m sure many people have taken different roads in storyboarding so there’s no RIGHT way to become a storyboard artist - these are just things that help me all the time. 

 REAL ADVICE: JUST START BOARDING. You can read all the books and tips in the world, but there’s no better learning tool than just going for it. 

Rule number one - Have fun! If you don’t like it, its fine. One of the first boards I did was in high school as my part in a group book report just because I wanted to and it was awful, but it was fun! :) 

If you’re looking for drawing tips I would say just start keeping a sketchbook and draw in the free time you have - observe from life, if you can go figure drawing that is also amazing for seeing and analyzing form. Be a sponge! 

For drawing and storyboarding - the goal is to not show a series of pretty drawings, the goal is to draw well enough so your drawing skill level doesn’t restrict you from telling the stories you want to tell.  Storyboarding isn’t really a drawing job, its a filmmaking job that uses drawings. 

Good draftsmanship is just the tool to convey the ideas in your head, whats really going to make a good story artist is your attention to the filmmaking. Here are some quick bullet points I can think of for that sort of big “filmmaking” blanket term. 

1. Characters and character relationships are key. Study screenwriting and take note of people in your life that have specific things about them that convey their unique personality! Your mom always taps her fingers on something when she’s thinking? Small things like that make characters feel real. They need to feel real to you when you’re drawing them! :) 

2.  Try to make your boards clear, concise and pay off whatever story you have set up. Show them to your friends and ask their opinion “Did that make sense?”. 

3. Learn the language of film. What is a close-up? Whats the difference between a “pan” and a “tilt”? Why does that cut work or not work?

4.  Watch movies and do film studies. Studying film is important. A lot of people will leave a movie and think “Hm. I didn’t like it.” yet not be sure how to articulate why, but they felt it. Start asking your self why.  

5. Vary your shots and try different tones (esp when starting out!) Comedy, drama, action, romance etc. It not only helps you become a diverse storyteller, it also points you in the direction you like best. 

6.Technical tip. Pay attention to geography in the shot, the 180 degree rule, making sure the space you’re drawing is convincing (this is where I’m trying to improve the most right now). You can draw a beautiful character, but if the space doesn’t feel right, then that’s going to distract from your storytelling. Remember to have the characters interact with the environment occasionally, it grounds any scene more! 

7. LOOK UP TO THE PEOPLE storyboarding now! There’s so many incredibly talented artists working now that are literally a Google search away. Check out their blogs (Mark Kennedy’s is particularly a treasure trove of knowledge) and just stay excited! Whatever storyboarding job you aspire to whether its independent, TV or feature animation - set your bar there! 

Hope that helps and good luck! 

-SV

  • Some artist who knows what they're doing: Right so I use a custom brush, it's got a soft edge but sort of a chalk texture, I set the layer to half opacity when I use it so that I can get the most out of shading with it. It's one of my several unique brushes, which I always keep in a special file.
  • Me, opening up Sai w/ the default pencil tool settings: thats really fuckin neat isnt it I eat my stylus
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Pika-Monuments by Pierre Kauffmann

Pierre Kauffmann was born in 1973 and has grown up in Alsace (East of France). He’s studied ne arts in Mulhouse’ s artschool where he’s obtained two diplomas in visual arts (1994 DNAP : Diplôme National d’Arts Plastiques, 1996 DNSEP : Diplôme National Supérieur d’Expression Plastique). Based in Paris, he was professionally launched into the show business and the street show where he’s learnt the techniques to creates costumes, sets, and so on.

It was in 2008, that he’s combined techniques and mediums he likes in a personal project to start the Pika-monuments collection. The artist travels all over the world to search for architectures. Once the site has been selected, he develops plans and volumes adaptable to the human body. He creates structures / objects / suits that he stages in situ. His work led him to explore the graphics of the photography as well as video projection. From these series of photos, he builds a universe of playful and decorative objects, pushing farther and farther the declension of his own researches.

The architecture, sewing, performance, photography, graphic design and art installation con rm its major tools of creation. For more than 7 years, The Pika-monuments collection stays his key project. His work was presented in personal and collective exhibitions in Paris and in France.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

anonymous asked:

I was looking trough your art and saw the paintings you did, and I totally fell in love with them! Your paintings are truly amazing! Do you maybe have some tips on how to do them? I'm trying to switch to painting but I just can't get it right :/ and it's really hard to find a good tool ;-;

Thank you!

I have this process gif and the only thing I can add is that if you’re having trouble seeing a drawing or if the colors mix up too much, do it in grayscale.

Now if you’re not familiar with it throw something like “grayscale tutorial” on google, you’ll need a whole tutorial and someone that can actually explain it properly for you, but it’ll be worth it!

About the tool, that really is entirely on you, a lot of artists just go with standard hard/soft brushes, I’m more comfortable with crispy pencil like things and rough ones (they’re literally named “rough” on SAI). You just need to keep tweaking and trying things out, it took me quite a while to find which settings I like better and I thought I would never find something that worked well for me on a digital pen, but I did! So don’t be discouraged and first and foremost focus on having fun when you’re drawing.

anonymous asked:

Hello <3 I am so shy but I really hope it is okay for you that I ask you a question! I got into digital drawing no too long ago and I'm trying really hard & it is so much fun but I struggle alot with line arts...Do you have tipps? Which brushes do you use for your line arts and different art styles? Mine look totally out of place and I get so sad and want to give up...I hope you can help me sorry if I am bothering you (T ^ T)

aw hello !! you’re not bothering me at all :^) it just takes practice and discovering the right methods/tools that work for you, so don’t give up yet!!

if you have clip studio paint, i use this brush (but you could probably use the “main brush” here as a substitute for paint tool sai). just drag it into your tools/brush panel and it should import (´• ω •`)b

i talked a bit about lineart here but something i should probably mention is that my sketch is my lineart, if that makes sense? i don’t want to bother inking, so i try to make the sketch look clean/decent enough on its own from the beginning. that’s just bc i’m lazy tho. artists who do digital painting tend to skip the lineart stage bc the sketch gets painted over.

another tip is to draw in brown instead of black, and lower the opacity of the lines to 90-95% before colouring. this helps reduce harshness. here’s a sketch i whipped up just now/// it’s not super clean but it’s good enough for me hahaha

i hope this helped a bit & i wish you luck with drawing !!!

A mind map is a graphical way to represent ideas and concepts. It is a visual thinking tool that helps structuring information, helping you to better analyze, comprehend, synthesize, recall and generate new ideas.

Just as in every great idea, its power lies in its simplicity.

In a mind map, as opposed to traditional note taking or a linear text, information is structured in a way that resembles much more closely how your brain actually works. Since it is an activity that is both analytical and artistic, it engages your brain in a much, much richer way, helping in all its cognitive functions. And, best of all, it is fun!

This is a mind map about – conveniently enough – mind mapping itself. It presents, in a visual way, the core elements and techniques on how to draw mind maps. Yes, I know this may look a little too messy initially, but bear with me: once you break the ingrained habit of linear note taking, you won’t look back.

Benefits and Uses

I think I already gave away the benefits of mind mapping and why mind maps work. Basically, mind mapping avoids dull, linear thinking, jogging your creativity and making note taking fun again.

But what can we use mind maps for?

  • Note taking
  • Brainstorming (individually or in groups)
  • Problem solving
  • Studying and memorization
  • Planning
  • Researching and consolidating information from multiple sources
  • Presenting information
  • Gaining insight on complex subjects
  • Jogging your creativity

It is hard to make justice to the number of uses mind maps can have – the truth is that they can help clarify your thinking in pretty much anything, in many different contexts: personal, family, educational or business. Planning you day or planning your life, summarizing a book, launching a project, planning and creating presentations, writing blog posts – well, you get the idea – anything, really.

How to Draw a Mind Map

Drawing a mind map is as simple as 1-2-3:

  • Start in the middle of a blank page, writing or drawing the idea you intend to develop. I would suggest that you use the page in landscape orientation.
  • Develop the related subtopics around this central topic, connecting each of them to the center with a line.
  • Repeat the same process for the subtopics, generating lower-level subtopics as you see fit, connecting each of those to the corresponding subtopic.

Some more recommendations:

  • Use colors, drawings and symbols copiously. Be as visual as you can, and your brain will thank you. I’ve met many people who don’t even try, with the excuse they’re “not artists”. Don’t let that keep you from trying it out!.
  • Keep the topics labels as short as possible, keeping them to a single word – or, better yet, to only a picture. Especially in your first mind maps, the temptation to write a complete phrase is enormous, but always look for opportunities to shorten it to a single word or figure – your mind map will be much more effective that way.
  • Vary text size, color and alignment. Vary the thickness and length of the lines. Provide as many visual cues as you can to emphasize important points. Every little bit helps engaging your brain.

Final Thoughts

Mind mapping is an absolutely fascinating and rich topic – this post only scratches the surface. If you want more reference material now, Wikipedia is always a good starting point.

In the meantime, please give mind mapping a chance – try it out. Follow these handy tips and see the results for yourself. Don’t worry too much about doing it the “right” way – just make it fun.

Kimberly

So it’s been a while since I’ve had Abstract Gem thoughts, but, with the idea that the Diamonds are more or less the near side of eldritch abominations, I had the thought that in this AU, icons or graven images of the Diamonds would get interesting, real quick.

It’s easy to represent them by more distant symbols- the colored diamond marks are safe enough to put directly on projected forms, and most go with that. A few claim that they feel something- a persistent warmth, a slight chill- on the skin that mark is laid against.

(In soft voices, some old soldiers attest that they feel a twinge, now and then, where their old pink diamond mark once rested)

The closer images get to depicting the true shape of the Diamonds the more energy is concentrated around the image. 

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

What type of device do you write with? Tablet, laptop, desktop? Mac or PC? A combination? I'm an artist and looking at possibly getting a Surface Pro tablet. I also want to dabble in writing. Also what software do you use? TY for any advice.

macbook pro.  final draft software.

but i promise you, its not the tool its the talent and concentration. every writer and artist i know can get you something out of anything.  i’ve seen artists make photo realistic drawing out of airport ketchup. i’ve seen eisner award winning scripts that started on cocktail napkins.

i have a friend that laid out a page on an etch a sketch while his kid fell asleep.

do your homework, get the best tools for you, but don’t become one of those ; i cannot draw unless i have my special pen’ people

there is really no such thing.

on the shop talk episode will eisner hosted for jack kirby, jack said every artist asks him what pen he uses as if it had magic in it.