it's perfect for game of thrones

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I can’t tell you how touched I am by your concern for my welfare.

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Jonsa AU: Sailor Moon

Sansa as Usagi Tsukino, Jon as Mamoru Chiba
“Why can’t you keep your stupid shoes on your feet, Odango?”
“Why do you have to be where my shoe lands?”

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There stood the wolf in the winter wind,
Full of fearsome might;
There stood the wolf in the winter wind,
King of the winter night.

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“ummmmm baby” I moan lightly “uhhh your so sexy” I moan in my sleep almost every dream this month I had seen this girl she was so beautiful and almost everytime I had seen her we had evened up having sex, she was perfect a wonderful person as well as amazing body any fantasy I had she would do there was no limit to what she would do sometimes I didn’t even have to tell her even if I just think about it she would do it… 

when I woke up I sat in bed thinking about her my perfect girl, too bad she is only a dream ..

“there is someone here to see you” my sister says coming into my room 

“who?” I ask 

“I think you will know” she smirked I went down to the door and there she stood  my perfect girl 

“its you” I say happily 

“you…I at last found you” she smiled running into my arms and it didn’t even take us long to get into my real room and get kissing for real…

In my mind, the most amazing and bittersweet ending of game of thornes is seeing Winterfell with starks children like it was at the beginning of the story. You know who shares that same dream as me? Jon snow and Sansa Stark: 

“ I might someday hold a son of my own blood in my arms. A son was something Jon Snow had never dared dream of, since he decided to live his life on the Wall. I could name him Robb…” - jon snow 

  If I give him sons, he may come to love me. She would name them Eddard and Brandon and Rickon and Robb, and raise them all to be as valiant as Ser Loras.And to hate Lannisters, too. In Sansa’s dreams, her children looked just like the brothers she had lost. Sometimes there was even a girl who looked like Arya.” - Sansa stark 

Now not only is amazing how they have the same dream of re-do Winterfell like it was before everything fell apart. But who is missing from that fantasy?  yes its eachothers,but why? Because they never had seen oneanother as family! People think if  jon  is doing  “incesty” love   it will be with Arya because in the books he thinks about her always but i think thats the reason why they could never work. They both see eachother as siblings the transiction to lovers would be a stab in the back for the readers: a CERSEI AND JAMIE but as stark! The shame, all the familiar love that makes the starks so amazing would be tainted. As Arya NEVER called Jon half-brother, never makes that distinction, but Sansa did. Sansa never saw jon as her real family. Its like Ned never calling Jon son (R+L=J). Its in the words GRRM use that the story is being told. 

Jon and sansa never thought about one another in a sibling way, never saw another as family. The reader wuold be bitter about them for sure ( who is happy about incest?) but it would not ruin a relationship that never was written in the first place.

Now dont get me wrong jon and sansa would NOT get married for love. It will be for duty, and really who in the books have more of a sense of duty then jon and sansa? Jon was willing to never have children and a wife for the night watch. Sansa talks about her duty as a wife since the first book ( I was meant to have his babies….or what if i dont give him a son?) 

Arya (but Daenerys too) never have this type of thoughts. They are passionate, in the long run ( or even at  first) they would get resentful and bitter about a political union with someone they dont love ( in the show you can see how dany is afraid of this). 


Sansa grew up with her mother sense of duty and family ( everyone and some can see the similiarity between sansa and her mother). She has learned that passion and love can take time, so a political marriage for her would not be that hard. But lets talk about the real issue people have with jon/sansa: 

 Jon would never marry is cousin,because incest is not is way:

 what if he finds the truth about his mother before meeting Daenerys. Then they meet and he is attracted to her? jon fighting is attraction for his aunt. And lets be real GRRM would not lose the opportunity of jon being conflicted about his love for his hot aunt . So Jon falls for Dany and they have the most romantic love, but both are heroes, they have to fight the others, so they cant both survive .i know people think Jon will be king, Dany is queen and Tyron will be the hand, but come on! this is Game of thrones and GRRM promised a bittersweet ending not the dinsey type of ending. If dany and jon happens the reader would had to swallow Jon and Sansa  ( because GRRM could always say: why jon with is aunt is romantic but jon with his cousin is creepy?, and he will be right. The incest thing wouldnt mean anything after jon and dany. The icky factor would be less shocking ( jon fell in love with his aunt, why cant he marry for duty is cousin?).  This just to say:this is all speculation but if by the end of season 7 sansa stays alive then this could very well happen.  The last book is called “ A promise of Spring” , the hope of happiness and if it not jon and sansa as cat and ned 2.0 married for duty but falling in love in time, i dont know what is.

I repeat: 

This is all speculation, wishfull thinking really. But How amazing and poetic would it be if the last scene of game of thrones is Sansa and Jon looking down at their children playing, and Jon saying to Sansa: “ a raven came this morning, a white raven, Spring is here” and they smile to oneanother.

‘Iron Fist’ deserves to flunk out of the TV dojo: EW review

Marvel’s Iron Fist isn’t just the wimpiest punch ever thrown by the world’s mightiest superhero factory. The new Netflix binge swings and misses so bad that it spins itself around and slaps itself silly with a weirdly flaccid hand. But even that might be generous. “Swing and a miss” implies effort. Iron Fist — devoid of vision, lacking in executional chops — barely even tries. It assumes its own marvelousness and proceeds tediously from there, offering few satisfactions for any possible audience. The media was only given six of the season’s 13 episodes for review, but I was snoozing after two and ready to check out after three. This is yellow belt drama that deserves to flunk out of the TV dojo.

The biggest problem with Iron Fist might be the property itself. With all due respect to character’s creators, comic book legends Roy Thomas and Gil Kane, Iron Fist, at least in my humble opinion, just isn’t all that interesting, and the show’s creator and exec producer, Scott Buck (Dexter), and his team fail to unlock any hidden potential or enhance the material to convince me otherwise. The storytelling formula they’ve been given doesn’t do them any favors, either. Iron Fist introduces its protagonist with the kind of season-long origin story common to Netflix-Marvel shows, in which an adult with extraordinary abilities and painful backstory works out issues and slowly develops a costumed vigilante identity. Daredevil forged the mold. Jessica Jones perfected it. Luke Cage did it well. Iron Fist just does it, lazily going through the motions like a bored tai chi artist.

Iron Fist has been described over the years as Iron Man with martial arts, but the series is a wannabe Batman Begins and a few other things, too, stretched way too thin. Danny Rand (Finn Jones from Game of Thrones) is an orphan who lost his billionaire parents when they all crashed in a suspicious plane accident in the Far East. Found and raised by monks who reside in a wintry Brigadoon known as K’un-Lun, Danny spent his formative years learning a mystic type of martial arts. Along the way, he acquired and honed a magical stroke of channeled chi called the Iron Fist, which causes his balled hand to Flame On! and obliterate anything with Hulk Smash! force.

RELATED: Comic-Con 2016: See Portraits of Marvel Studios Stars

All of this hoo-ha is doled out in bits and drabs of flashback. Like all Marvel-Netflix shows, Iron Fist wants to be an adult-skewing neo-pulp urban crime serial, so it downplays the supernatural aspects as if terrified of them. Danny’s blazing balled fist? It’s used sparingly. (As usual, the connections to the broader Marvel Universe, with its thunder gods, sci-fi monsters and radioactive spider-men, are conspicuously minimized.) More so than any other Marvel series, the concept is beholden to the mandate of “the produceable premise,” and the producers have limited imagination for fulfilling it. Anyone wanting Fists of Fury in the City should table the expectation, and modern comics fanboys should abandon all hope of anything resembling the celebrated, stylish run of the comics treatment by Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction and David Aja that leaned hard into the fantastical.

Iron Fist — which, like Daredevil, aspires to be one half workplace drama, one half action-adventure show — spends the first half of the season slooooooowly developing the first half of this hybrid personality. The series proper begins with Danny — presumed dead by the rest of the world — returning to New York to reclaim his life, fortune and place within the massive corporation started by his father and pursue his do-gooder destiny. In a refreshing change of pace, Danny is no dark knight, though his reverse negative formulation isn’t all that compelling. He’s an elevated man-child, light of spirit and movement, lit with a simpleton’s purity, a hippie-dippy Chauncey Gardener. He re-enters Manhattan on bare feet, gawking at skyscrapers; he shows up at Rand Industries naively expecting to be recognized and greeted like the prodigal son. This could be interesting and it should be funny, but the writing and directing don’t know how to make it so. Jones nails the earnestness, but that’s all he plays.

Danny, an overtly spiritual character, adheres to some form of generic, modulated Buddhism marked by a disinterest in worldly attachments (like, you know, shoes) and a remove from anger that doesn’t detach him from a want for justice. Some have criticized Iron First sight unseen for cultural appropriation, and they’re not wrong. The show validates the complaint by being both slavish and shy about Danny’s purely fantastical K’un-Lun origin story. The character has always been white in the comics, but who cares? Ultimately, I don’t see why Marvel couldn’t have cast Danny with an Asian actor.

The enlightened individual Danny has become contrasted with two childhood friends who initially present as antagonists, but really represent the people he needs to save: brother and sister Joy and Ward Meachum (The Following’s Jessica Stroup and Banshee’s Tom Pelphrey). They’re now soulless suits who manage Rand Industries on behalf of their puppet master pops, Harold Meachum (David Wenham), a ruthless, reclusive mystery man. He has a love interest — and, presumably, future partner in ass-kicking — in the form of Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick, also from Game of Thrones), a tough and lonely martial arts instructor. (Let me note here that all of these actors are very good, but their characters are skimpy and boring.)

Pacing issues hamper so many Netflix serials. In the Marvel shows, the lag hits around mid-season. Iron Fist is sluggish from the get-go. At first, Joy and Ward take Danny to be a crazy man and treat him as such: Episode 2 traps him in a psych ward, an idyll that immediately sidetracks the narrative when it should be settling into a premise. Eventually, the Meachums come to accept that Danny is Danny and begin to wrestle with the implications, which prods them to confront their own waywardness and set them on track to go from foes to allies. By episode 6, Iron Fist gets Danny into a suit and has him helping people — but it’s a three-piece business suit. His heroism consists of saving the soul of Rand Industries, from trying to make things right with a family devastated by Rand’s toxic pollution, to investigating a plot by Japanese ninja gangsters known as The Hand (introduced in Daredevil), to use the company as a mechanism to sell drugs in Manhattan.

I think Iron Fist wants to be some subversive scold of capitalism or secularism. Rand Industries is monolithic big business as super-villain — the Evil Corp. of Mr. Robot (but without any of the personality or true menace imbued by Michael Cristofer’s Phillip Pryce or Martin Wallstrom’s Tyrell Wellick) — with Danny functioning as a redemptive agent, facilitating change from within, not with subversive hacking but with his love-thy-neighbor conscience and atoning activism. I’m not going to dump on those values; I just wish they were played bolder and with more imagination.

The alt-New York that the Marvel-Netflix shows is interesting, at least in concept. You got Luke Cage up in Harlem participating in the redemption and reconstruction of a struggling community. You got Daredevil and Jessica Jones down in Hell’s Kitchen, looking out for the poor and for women and everyone who would exploit and prey upon them. Now, somewhat above them all but also among them, we have Danny, a billionaire suit with a heart of gold, exercising a liberal social conscience in the board room and on the streets. My theory about Marvel’s The Defenders — the forthcoming team-up show — is that it’ll be a superhero remake of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis.

Whatever they do in The Defenders, whoever the heroes battle, I hope the fights are better than ones we get in Iron Fist. For starters, there aren’t many of them in the first six episodes. But the ones we get are shockingly lame, from the choreography to the performances to the way they are shot. They’re yoga fu.

I think the idea is that Danny is so disciplined in his technique, so mature about his use of violence, he can dispatch opponents with a minimum of moves and with the precise amount of force necessary for the situation. But the show’s ambition to produce an illusion of effortlessness results in fight scenes that look like no effort was put into them at all — as if they shot the dress rehearsal and moved on. All of this said, great fight scenes take time to produce, and in Hollywood, time costs money. I’ve often suspected that Marvel-Netflix shows are made on a tight budget, and it could be that Iron Fist is saving all its pennies for the second half of the season, which promises to have more action as conflicts start to boil, bad guys make their moves, and Danny moves into masked crime-fighter mode.

Yet I can’t say the first half of the season does anything to make me care enough to stick around and find out if I’m right. Iron Fist is pure kung-phooey. Make him number 100 on your list of TV super-guys. D

Iron Fist will be available for streaming Friday, March 17 on Netflix.

And some more headshot sketchy things. :D

This time Beskha and Amaya, my perfect beat-up scumbag angels.

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Iain said of Delicious: “I was sent the script and was told that Dawn and Emilia were attached to it, and I had a window where it would be possible to do it before the new season of Game of Thrones. So it was a perfect fit.

“I loved the scripts. They were quite unusual, very funny but also very perceptive about human nature and all its foibles. It was very accurate on relationships and it was overwhelmingly funny.

“It’s really about the minutiae of modern relationships between men and women and family, and how people fall in and out of love.

“And then there was the lovely thing that I was an admirer of Dawn and had worked with Emilia before, so that made it even more appealing.”

Petyr and Season 7

Okay, so I’m not going to pretend that I know what will happen with Petyr next season. I have my hopes and dreams but I don’t know if they will come true. I want to talk about the possibility of him dying in season 7 (please god no) and whether or not I will abandon this ship.

The answer is no. I won’t.

I see so many people on here saying that the ship has sunk and that its over. Well, no its not because he just confessed his love for her (whether he meant it or was lying…who knows. Its fucking Petyr Baelish) and told her he wants her to win the North. To me, that means the ship is sailing even if Sansa is a bit mad at him.

But lets pretend for a second he dies next season or even in season 8; that still does not mean the ship is over. That is the beauty about shipping; it never has to end. It will be painful to see AG off the show and our favorite character killed off but that does not mean we will never have them together. There are memes, videos, fanfics, fan art and so many other things that will keep this ship afloat. Its like turning back time to the perfect happy moment. Petyr dies? Go read a fic where he is alive and scheming the pants off of Sansa. Or a fan video dedicated to him. Whatever happens, the ship will still sail.

Once the show is completed and maybe both of them die or just one or they end up on the iron throne-the ship will live on; no matter what the outcome of the show is.

Imagine: Winter is coming, but everything is alright in the world. You are sitting by Bran's side on the throne in Winterfell. It's peaceful. Everyone is safe and Bran is a great King in the North and he dotes on his people and they love him immensely. You smile at Bran's son in your arms and can't believe how perfect everything is, and how you became so lucky to be Bran's queen.

Requested by  mother-of-the-fandom

Gif Credit: Tumblr

Galatea.

oneshot

pairing; doll/mannequin!jihoon x creator!reader

summary; No man has ever caught your eye. You saw them as stuck up, annoying, disgusting and arrogant… That is, until Jihoon began to function without strings and fingers to pull them.

word count; 1,421

a/n; wowie! haven’t posted any of my works for weeks! my biggest apologies everyone, im v busy w school and work. im currently in bed w the flu so ive been writing a butt ton all day! im tagging @fairyjeons​ bc she’s beyond excited to see this! <3

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