it's a hard life there for a z

Jay-Z, DJ Clue?, DMX, Method Man and Redman, photographed showing off their Gold and Platinum plaques backstage during the “Hard Knock Life Tour” by Barry Roden in March 1999. 

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again.” “But,” he added, “you can only make history once.”

anonymous asked:

Do you think it's important to master realism before finding your own style? I've been tying so hard lately to get more realistic but it's so frustrating because I never get there, but I'm so much happier when I draw in a more relaxed style. I want to improve myself though, so still I'm really torn!!!

I think drawing from life and trying to draw realistically is vital to improving your work

but I dunno about “mastering” it… coming back to it maybe and doing some studies when you feel like X/Y/Z is lacking in your art, yes, I think so

but if your end-goal isn’t to draw super realistic stuff then I wouldn’t majorly focus on it

better to have fun and focus on the kind of art you want to draw with a side-dish of life-drawing, anatomy, perspective, etc

I believe having an understanding of those things will greatly improve your work regardless of what kind of style you’re going for

On this date in history: June 6, 1984 — Tetris was published. Russian computer engineer, Alexey Pajitnov, created the puzzle game based on an ancient Roman game, and it gained a wide audience through a software version developed for IBM. From there, it spread to the Nintendo gaming console, Gameboys and home computers. Soon, pretty much everyone knew how to play Tetris, and had — at one time or another — become a bleary-eyed Tetris zealot.⠀

The original purpose of Tetris, according to Pajitnov, was to help make computers seem less intimidating to casual users. The game is simple enough. Tetrominoes are shapes made up of little squares and each variant has its own name: O-Tetromino, I-Tetromino, T-Tetromino, L-Tetromino, J-Tetromino, S-Tetromino, and Z-Tetromino. As the pieces fall down a kind of well, you can rotate the shapes as they fall. The object is to get an entire horizontal row of squares (without any holes). When a row is completed, it disappears. But the tetrominoes fall fast and hard, and if you don’t clear your squares before they’re stacked to the top, you’re out of luck.⠀

The game is so addictive, in fact, that players may start seeing possible Tetris configurations in their daily life – unevenly stacked books, a brick side of a building or even dreams. It’s so well-known, in fact, that it’s given a name – the “Tetris Effect.” https://www.instagram.com/p/BVAzbC5FE_v/

Oshea Jackson Jr - iTunes Q&A
  • Question: What's your favorite song?
  • O'shea: The Perfect Beat by Afrika Bambatta
  • Q: What's the scariest movie you've ever seen?
  • O'shea: I don't get scared by movies, really. But I'm easily disturbed. When I first saw 'Hills Have Eyes', I couldn't get some images out of my head. Still actually
  • Q: What's your favorite movie starring your dad?
  • O'shea: All about the benjamins. Super Suuuuper underrated
  • Q: What's your favorite Ice Cube song?
  • O'shea: Natural Born Killaz
  • Q: Whe do you think you'll finish screenwriting at USC?
  • O'shea: When I feel like my writing is missing something. I'll know it's time to sharpen back up and get to my cinematic roots.
  • Q: When can we expect music from you?
  • O'shea: Ingratiate I would love to do music. I still snap over instruments to myself. But they might typecast ya mans if I put certain type record. For now I'm focused on my craft as an actor but my older brother and I have started a producing team.
  • Q: Why haven't you used your snap?
  • O'shea: Everytime I'm on any social media I'm just thinking. "Why am I not on instagram?"
  • Q: What is your favorite part in SOC?
  • O'shea: Smashing Bryan Turners office. We've all wanted to break things with a bat before.
  • Q: What do you like to do in your free time?
  • O'shea: Crush my enemies. Not really. But I'm a real Nerd and I am completely unapologetic. When I gotta unwind it's video game time.
  • Q: Why didn’t you release the video for ‘Ain’t No Place’? Was it because of being typecast?
  • O'shea: Yes. With the movie having buzz around the Academy I didn't want any possibility of the song affecting the film. And I didn't want it to look like I'm Ice Cube part 2 out here. lol.
  • Q: Were you nervous about trying out for the movie?
  • O'shea: I was extremely nervous. I had to audition for two years and when you've never been through the process. You don't know what could've made you or boke you during that little time you had auditioning. If I didn't take the role. The world woulda killed me. If I didn't win the role. The world woulda killed me. And I was it was as movie. The world woulda killed me. At the end of the day, nothing was gonna sop me from immortalizing my dad in film. A lot of people ain't want me to get the part. Be he did and that's all I needed.
  • Q: Celeb crush?
  • O'shea: She's taken already. Don't wanna start waves.
  • Q: Did you practice some of the songs with your father or did you learn on your own?
  • O'shea: The performance and studio scenes in SOC are me in my element. What I'm used to doing. So when I was there it's like, wait y'all want me to rap my DAD's songs? I BEEN DOIN THIS.
  • Q: Were any of the scenes hard to do?
  • O'shea: More cowbell #SNLjoke
  • Q: Actors you look up to?
  • O'shea: Denzel and Leo
  • Q: Did you re-record some of Cube's verses or lip sync?
  • O'shea: We recorded the whole album, fam
  • Q: Marvel or DC?
  • O'shea: If you gotta ask. Somethin must be wrong.
  • Q: Do you like your fathers older movies?
  • O'shea: of course. People don't appreciate what a great film Players Club is.
  • Q: Do you ever feel pressure to surpass all that your father has accomplished?
  • O'shea: I've felt it since I was in the 5th grade. (The pressure) it doesn't come from him. All of it comes from me because I don't want to feed into the narrative of talent skips a generation or the whole "was born on 3rd base, and thought he hit a triple." Aspect. I'm so appreciative of my blessings and the only way to ensure my own legacy is to perfect my craft.
  • Q: Worst movie you've ever seen?
  • O'shea: Movie 43
  • Q: Best compliment you've ever heard?
  • O'shea: When I hear that I inspire someone. Being a celebrity is cute and all but it's smoke and mirrors. I understand that this all can be taken away in an instant. FAME is a jellyfish. Yeah it's beautiful but don't you dare get wrapped up in it. So while I do have a platform, the best thing i can do is to encourage or inspire. If not i'm just being selfish.
  • Q: Are you going to see Kobe play his very last game?
  • O'shea: Yeah I'll be the guy crying uncontrollably being escorted by security
  • Q: Would you take a role in a Tyler Perry movie?
  • O'shea: Is it about a single parent overcoming obstacles while still maintaining their strong christian values?
  • Q: What artist would we be surprised you listen to?
  • O'shea: I love Imagine Dragons and F.U.N.
  • Q: How was it growing up as ice cubes son?
  • O'shea: It has it's perks of course. But kind of annoying until you grow up lol. I have to put people through so many trials in order for you to be considered my friend. You don't know people's motives. My friend Tanner was my very first friend EVER. Met in kindergarten. Just said 'hey I'm Shea lets be friends.' After that.....Everyone else know me as ice cubes son. But my friends. Call me Shea. And it's 5 of them. You just grow up thinking different being ice cubes son.
  • Q: Would you want your kids to follow in your footsteps?
  • O'shea: If it was their choice by all means. My parents allowed us to find our own paths. But give everything your best effort because if you don't, then why are you doing it?
  • Q: What advice would you give your younger self?
  • O'shea: learn how to dunk
  • Q: Fave Rappers?
  • O'shea: Dwayne Michael Carter and Sean Anderson
  • Q: Which Ice Cube verse is your fave?
  • O'shea: "G-d damn I'm glad y'all set it off....."
  • Q: What's your fave app?
  • O'shea: ESPN Radio
  • Q: Will you answer me on day? :(
  • O'shea: "Maybe one Day..." - Drake
  • Q: Do you like Justin Biebers new album?
  • O'shea: I would be lying if I said Justin Bieber didn't have a few tracks on that thang
  • Q: Do you think education is necessary?
  • O'shea: I definitely feel that education is important. But I also feel the mind will not process information it feels it doesn't need. Find what interests you and educate.
  • Q: Growing up, what was the biggest problem you faced?
  • O'shea: Keepin the snakes out the grass.
  • Q: What type of films would you develop as a screenwriter? Is there certain topics that you're passionate about?
  • O'shea: I'm into smart comedies. And movies that don't give a lot away so you're not in the theater tryna guess things before they happen. You kinda just take the films scene by scene like life. If I could write a modern day Big Lebowski, I would be happy as an accomplished writer.
  • Q: Your thoughts about ride along 2?
  • O'shea: needs more me
  • Q: Any difference between before SOC and after?
  • O'shea: I'm a lot meaner and nicer at the same time
  • Q: Any tv shows you want to be part of?
  • O'shea: I would love to be apart of Better Call Saul
  • Q: Favorite place to relax?
  • O'shea: In a woman's presence. #CasonovaAnswer
  • Q: Rihanna or Beyonce?
  • O'shea: Beyoncé whole personality reminds me of my mom. I've never been attracted to her because I see too much of my mom.
  • Q: If you could have a superpower, what would it be?
  • O'shea: For everything to go my way at that moment.
  • Q: Favorite hip hop song of all time?
  • O'shea: Y.O.U. by Redman/Methodman
  • Q: Do you like Hockey? What's your favorite team?
  • O'shea: GO KINGS GO. GO KINGS GO.
  • Q: Do you know how to cook?
  • O'Shea: Only if the BasedGod is okay with it
  • Q: New or Old School?
  • O'shea: 90's. It had more Ice Cube and Dr Dre.
  • Q: Favorite historical figure?
  • O'shea: Mark Twain
  • Q: Dream starting 5 for NBA Basketball?
  • O'shea: Magic Johnson, Kobe Bryant, James Worthy, Kareem-Abdul Jabbar and Shaq
  • Q: What's your favorite word to say?
  • O'shea: It's a cuss word.
  • Q: Star Wars or Harry Potter?
  • O'shea: This can't be a real question.
  • Q: How many Yeezys you got?
  • O'shea: 3. 2 Nikes first editions
  • Q: Would SOC be better if Jason had Eazy with him?
  • O'shea: The fact that he didn't have Eazy is why I would've nominated him
  • Q: If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be?
  • O'shea: I'd make everyone more understanding. We'd be fine.
  • Q: Was wondering if you'd like both (Harry Potter/Star Wars)?
  • O'shea: Definitely like both. But give me the force over Magic. #RIPSeverus
  • Q: If you could speak another language what would it be?
  • O'shea: German and Spanish
  • Q: Are you worried that people will only ever see you as your dad's son and not you as yourself?
  • O'shea: Of course. But then I look at people like Kobe, Steph Curry, The Rock...they took their family legacy to new heights. That's my goal.
  • Q: Do you have any tattoo's? if so what do they mean?
  • O'shea: the Roman numeral for 24. XXiV. And before the Kobe talk starts. 24 has always been my number. It's my birthday. 2/24. It just always feels so complete. And my life changed at 24. It's only right
  • Q: Boyz n the hood or Barber Shop?
  • O'shea: Boyz n the hood had a message.
  • Q: Why learn Spanish and German?
  • O'shea: both are used in a vast variate of regions. May come in handy if ever abroad
  • Q: Do you still workout?
  • O'shea: Yeah dude. Still am. But decisions were made and now I'm makin work. #BooHoo
  • Q: What motivates you?
  • O'shea: My family.
  • Q: How are you handling all this attention you're getting?
  • O'shea: in my room ignoring most of it
  • Q: What is the most like you, chocolate or gummy bears?
  • O'shea: Hardest thing I ever had to do
  • Q: Fave Dragon Ball Z Character?
  • O'shea: Kakarot
  • Q: What do you fear most?
  • O'shea: Not being happy is my biggest fear
  • Q: Any advice for aspiring actors?
  • O'shea: Ask yourself why did you start acting. If it's to be famous. You will lose.
  • Q: Favorite disney movie?
  • O'shea: Lion King
  • Q: Do you find it hard to trust people?
  • O'shea: my whole life I couldn't trust anyone.
  • Q: Favorite cartoon to watch growing up?
  • O'shea: Dragon Ball Z or Ed Edd n Eddy
  • Q: How did you deal with people that were only your friend because of your dad?
  • O'shea: I don't deal with them. Bad energy.
  • Q: If you were an animal what would you be?
  • O'shea: Orca. Biggest and strongest in the ocean. And I'm a genius!? In pods running from 12-30 of the homies deep!?
  • Q: What's your type of woman?
  • O'shea: Sexy kind.
  • Q: Number one pick up line?
  • O'shea: You know how much a polar bear weighs? Enough to break the ice. O'shea Jackson, nice to meet you.
  • Q: Do you like apples?
  • O'shea: I got her number....
  • Q: Advice you would give to aspiring actors?
  • O'shea: Be an actor first. And a star 3rd.
  • And the last question, deserves it's own post...That's all folks.
2

1993. Bloody Kisses

is the third album by the band Type O Negative. It is also the last recording to feature band’s original line-up, as drummer Sal Abruscato would leave Type O Negative in late 1993. The album further established Type O Negative motifs, such as including cover songs restylized into gloomy gothic metal, sample-heavy soundscapes in between songs, and dry, satirical humor. This album includes a cover of the Seals and Crofts song “Summer Breeze”.

Bloody Kisses was the first album on Roadrunner Records to achieve gold and platinum certification.

The most successful single from Bloody Kisses was the song “Black No.1 (Little Miss Scare-All)”, which poked fun at and paid tribute to gothic subculture stereotypes. A radio edit of the song achieved modest airplay and the song was a staple of Type O Negative’s concerts.

The tracks “Kill All the White People” (live performances included Lord Nelson from Stuck Mojo on vocals) and “We Hate Everyone” (with Alan Robert, Mina (credited as Keith) Caputo and Joey Z. from Life of Agony providing additional backing vocals) were written in response to the controversy over the band’s alleged racist sentiments that emerged after a tour in Europe and because of Peter Steele’s previous band Carnivore’s explicit lyrics. They feature lyrics mocking the whole issue.

“Bloody Kisses” is, indeed, like Peter said “the first true Type O Negative album”, because it detaches from the previous albums (namely, “Slow, Deep and Hard” and “The Origin of the feces”) through its ideology: “Bloody Kisses” really highlights depression and despair through depressive and desperate music precisely, whereas the two previous albums, though employing the same themes, were envisioning them through a rather funny, punkish, full of scorn and black humor dominated music.

this is Type O’s best release. It is the second doomiest only to World Coming Down and it is certainly their darkest, most depressive release. Strongly recommended to doom fans, goth fans, and metal fans in general.

     Peter Steele     Josh Silver     Kenny Hickey     Sal Abruscato

Jay-Z, photographed performing during the first of two “Hard Knock Life Tour” shows at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas on April 18, 1999.

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again… But you can only make history once.”

no no like “azure” like azoore but with the right u sound. The one that’s more closed and up high in the roof of your mouth I forget its name but it’s a v good sound. And maybe a softer r??? And a z. A hard s or even maybe a soft s I’ve heard it many ways but never with a soft j I’m suffering

sappypotter  asked:

congrats on the followers honey !! you deserve 10 times as much tbh ;D 🐻&🐞 bc i'm greedy as fuck #hiss

🐻 i love your theme, it’s so clean and minimal but with your sidebar image its still very #aesthetic, your content is awesome (and its always good to have more drarry content in my life lbr), and you’re super lovely? also ur mobile header is a+++

🐞 (i’m doing eliza if thats ok? also wow z is hard to find songs for <3)

Elastic Heart - Sia

Leave a Trace - CHVRCHES

I Walk The Line - Halsey

Zero - Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Arise - Flyleaf

3

Jay on Michael: “My favorite album is Off the Wall…it’s difficult to say your favorite album, but Off the Wall is one of those albums that was timeless; that didn’t have a genre…”

“He’s just really a simple person. He called me…and he was like ‘Man you  was so in the pocket with Hard Knock Life’ and I’m like 'Mike you like flow?’ [laughs] And I was like 'I’m having a concert this week, you should come’, you know, half joking, just throwing it out there, and he’s like 'Okay!’ And he came, he brought the kids, there was 2 of them at the time, and they were running around backstage, you know, very simple.”

OMG so i reached my 1st goal of 500 followers and  that’s like….. mind blowing for me. my next goal is 1k!  thank you so much to everyone who follows me, i see you guys doing your thing. this blog has been around for a while but im so happy where i am right now! as a little thank you thank you, i’ll do a follower forever! excuse my poor editing skills lmao, but credit to the stickers goes to this  line page. 

the ones in BOLD are my mutuals, and the ones with a  ♥️ next to them are my faves. i dont talk to many of you, but i sure would like too!

Keep reading

Plans

Title: Plans
Fandom: Valdaya
Note: A little idea that popped in my head
Disclaimer: All in fun skip if against

Zendaya found it hard and painful to breath, was this was a panic attack felt like? Should she get someone she wondered before forcing herself to exhale deeply. No. She could handle this, she could stick to the plan, and with a visible shaking finger hit unfollow iamvalc. One down, half a dozen to go.

***Two years later***

Keep reading

I think that Lin is stepping forward, boldly, with the first real synthesis of two great American institutions: the Broadway musical and hip-hop. Before Hamilton, each of them had their monuments. Broadway had its Chorus Line, Cats and West Side Story. Hip-hop had its Ready to Die, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back and 3 Feet High and Rising. But the two worlds turned independently of one another. When there was a seismic event on Broadway, the citizens of hip-hop nation didn’t feel the ground move under their feet. And when there was a major release or retrenchment in hip-hop, the dancers and directors and dramaturges didn’t experience an inner reawakening. Until now. Because Hamilton’s isn’t just a hip-hop musical or a stage presentation of hip-hop; it’s organically and genuinely both things at once, in ways that are too important to be skimmed over.

Let’s start with the music and build up from there. When I hear Hamilton described as a “hip-hop musical,” even when I’m the one doing the describing, I balk a little bit at the phrase. Even when swearing to friends that it’s not “B-boy with spirit fingers,” it’s hard to capture. The music in the show isn’t limited to hip-hop. There are elements of pop and elements of rock and elements of the more traditional show-tune feel. But the very fact that the show draws on all these diverse genres is exactly what makes it hip-hop in spirit. Think back to all the different kinds of music and musical energy that have been absorbed into hip-hop. Run-DMC used American hard rock, in the form of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way,” for their song of the same name. Kanye West sampled classic R&B, in the form of Ray Charles, for “Gold Digger.” And Jay-Z used Broadway show tunes themselves, in the form of the Annie lament “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” for “Hard Knock Life (Ghetto Anthem)” (and then, in an encore performance, the Oliver! song “I’ll Do Anything” for “Anything”). Hip-hop, at its heart, draws on old pieces of multiple traditions but gives them a new context and new life.

The show’s tagline, “This is the story of America then, told by America now,” thinks that it’s about American history, but it’s just as much about American musical history, and specifically about the way that hip-hop has always operated. It locates the past and adds a layer of the present in a way that becomes genuinely forward-looking. That’s the first great hip-hop characteristic of the show, to borrow all kinds of music equally, and to turn them toward one end.

The second comes from Lin’s profound understanding of what makes hip-hop truly revolutionary. Broadway, at its best, works because of its spectacle: It has precision and scale and energy, and it manages to have these things over and over again without losing a step. A Broadway trouper can hit his or her marks precisely and powerfully whether it’s the first time or (in the case of the Phantom of the Opera) the 10 thousandth. Hip-hop comes from a different place. It has immediacy and cleverness and the sense of doing something big with relatively simple supplies (voice, sample, brain).

This is where Hamilton really soars. Every time I have seen it, I have tried to dissect what I’m watching: not to understand it, but to dissect it, analytically, and then count the parts. There aren’t that many parts. There are actors and dancers and a script and lighting cues and music. Those are the basic organs required for survival. But they’re used with an efficiency and a certainty that can only come from hip-hop, and from Lin’s understanding of what hip-hop really is, down at the bottom.

Jay-Z, photographed performing during the first of two “ Hard Knock Life Tour” shows at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas on April 18, 1999.

The star-studded 54-date tour grossed $18 million and suffered no cancellations (in fact, it added 17 extra dates during its cross-country trek to meet the high demand), no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence—completely silencing the mainstream critics who believed a purely rap tour of its magnitude couldn’t be done. “People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it “the most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.” Jigga would add this about whether he was surprised the tour unfolded without fan violence: “Anytime you get a large group of people in one building together, whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll, country music, whatever it is, there’s always a chance for violence, there’s always a chance for something happening. We didn’t believe the music would contribute to that.”

Jay and X would donate their proceeds from the Denver stop of the tour to help the families of the victims of the Columbine tragedy. “We decided to donate the proceeds from this show as soon as we saw the date on the schedule. We’ve known first hand how pointless and senseless violence always is, and we wanted to show our support in a real way” Jay said of the decision.

The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during opening weekend; and made over $1.2 million during its four-week run. It was released on DVD in February 2001, and is available for purchase or streaming.

Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack Backstage: A Hard Knock Life was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA three months after its release.

In an interview with MTV in October 1999 Hov said he wouldn’t be against recreating the tour at the top of 2000 to support the artists new projects: “Well, the same people are [releasing new albums] at the same time. DMX comes out, myself comes out, Method Man, Redman, we all come out. So hopefully we be as hot and we try and do it all over again… But you can only make history once.”

Jay-Z, DJ Clue?, Redman, DMX and Method Man pose during a photo session after announcing their 40-city Hard Knock Life Tour in New York on January 26, 1999.

The tour was the first multi-group hip-hop tour in almost a decade, featuring many of hip hop’s biggest names. When announced many mainstream media outlets theorized that the tour would be cancelled; with some saying heated competition between rap acts would erupt in backstage violence, and gang violence would be perpetrated in the crowd.

”People were saying someone’s going to die on that tour,” Damon Dash recalled in an interview with Entertainment Weekly in May 1999, but after 11 weeks on the road, playing in sold-out arenas from Canada to Texas, ”there was no violence and no fights.” Declaring it the ”most successful hip-hop tour ever,” Dash unabashedly went on to say, ”we set a precedent not just for rap tours, but for all music tours.”

The Hard Knock Life Tour sold out 52 arenas, earned $18 million and suffered no cancellations, no artist drop-offs, or any incidents of violence. The rappers took a further stand against violence by dedicating their personal earnings from their Colorado concert to the victims of the Columbine High School shooting. The tour was chronicled in the September 2000 documentary film Backstage, featuring live performances by the tour’s roster and an in-depth look at the events backstage. The film grossed $496,226 at the box office during its limited-release opening weekend. Presented by DJ Clue?, the majority of the soundtrack, Backstage: A Hard Knock Life, was recorded on tour buses while the acts traveled around North America. The album was certified Gold three months after its release.

So I was reminiscing about my elementary and early middle school days and I realized something. I really hated 3rd grade to 7th grade. I am asking (a less harsh term than "ordering") all the current and future educators out there now to not alphabetize your students when it comes to first come, first serve situations. It is incredibly discriminatory.

I remember being forced into the back of the lunch line so they could scan our names in order. They had changed from us giving them our number when we got there to standing in order to sometimes make things easier for them. Not only did I get a shorter lunch period than a good bit of my classmates, but my homeroom table was one or two seats short of the total number of students in the class. This meant when the evil Ws took advantage of my then shyness and passed me after getting scanned, I was forced to sit at the detention table and couldn’t speak to anyone, or I would get yelled at because, while I was allowed to talk, no one else at the table was. 

I also remember Mrs. Scott (you think she would be sympathetic, being an S and all) went in alphabetical order for a European country report. She wanted everyone to do a different one, but by the time she got to R, all that were left were the really obscure countries. This is not to say that they aren’t any less important, but come on, what would your 12 year old self want to do? France or Monaco? I took Albania because it was in a song in an early season of Cheers. My mom yelled at me and said, “What are you even going to write about on Albania?” What a racist. Or a nationalist. Anti-Albanian? Whatever.

It doesn’t really matter during calling attendance but when it came to situations like these, it bothered me that they never switched it up a bit. I mean, look how much I just wrote. I’m obviously still very scarred to this day.

If this is still a case in the school system, I should just change my career path to a teacher so poor little Zelda Zurofante has a chance.

  • Me: Hi, yeah, is there any chance you could make this small accomodation for me? Thanks.
  • Neurotypical: What? That's ridiculous. Why do you need that? That's a silly thing to need. Seriously, why would you ever need that?
  • Me: *Sigh* You know what? Here's some literature on autism. Hopefully that can help you to understand.
  • Neurotypical: *Comes back after reading* Oh, I totally understand now.
  • Me: Okay, so can I get this little accomodation then?
  • Neurotypical: I understand you so much now! Oh, you're such an inspiration! Being out of the house and around people. It's like you're a Real Girl!
  • Me: What are you talking about? Look, I just need this *tiny* adjustment...
  • Neurotypical: Your life must be so hard with people assuming you can do things when you can't!
  • Me: Yeah, it sucks, I guess. Whatever. Can. I. Have. This. Accomodation? Please?
  • Neurotypical: Let's do X, Y and Z! That'll help!
  • Me: Okay, but they're not what I asked for. X is nice, but far from nessecary. Y doesn't even affect me. Z is just you taking what I'm asking for to a ridiculous level when what I asked for would be fine.
  • Neurotypical: Do not worry, Person With Autism! I, expert in autism, will now decide what accomodations you need for you. Don't worry about it!
  • Me: *Sighs for a thousand years*

nywah  asked:

Yay, my second question of the week! Anyway, I wanted to say you're a big role model for me and thanks for asking my previous question. Do you have any tips on drawing perhaps? I'm looking on how I can get better!

Hey buddy, no worries.  Just draw lots and draw often.  Don’t be afraid to look at art you like and try and replicate things in private, it can help build up your visual memory and fill in the blanks where you’re struggling.  Of course, if you can manage try and draw from life a bit, I wish I did this more often myself.. But yeah its something that is very important!  Keep a sketchbook and fill that shit up as much as you can.. Or at least draw constantly on your computer to the point where when you use paper you’re reaching for an imaginary Ctrl+Z.  There’s always something new to learn and you’ll always second guess your old work after a month.  I myself have a hard time looking at anything I did over a month before.. But that’s good, keeps you improving.  ALSO like.. I guess make artist friends?  That’s always cool.  You learn a lot together and its a great experience.  Just be honest with each other when you think something needs work in a certain area and learn to take criticism.  There’s nothing better than an Artist buddy who isn’t afraid to tell you something sucks.  I gained a lot from being involved in online art communities growing up, really helped me grow and develop.  OH.. Also make a reference folder to put art you like in it.. I have one that’s like 25gb of images that are all categorized into things like robots, animals, anatomy, environments and such.

Sorry I babbled, hope that helps.

aquacycle  asked:

tell me the smash story

Smash Bros is one of my favorite game series of all times its hard to pick just one.

In my senior year of high school I brought my Nintendo 64 to band camp, and at this band camp we stayed in huge college dorms that could fit 8 people. So every night after all the band camp stuff we’d play Smash 64.

One of the greatest moments to come from that was when we were playing on Sector Z. I was playing a Mario (my 64 main), and my friend was playing as Link, who he was best with.

It’s down to the last life, the other two players have been knocked out (one of which was playing as a Yellow Yoshi which he dubbed “Piss Yoshi”, a name I affectionately stole when I started playing Yoshi). We’re both very close to death. In Smash 64, throws were hella powerful so if we got grabbed it was game over.

Now for those not well-versed in Smash, Link’s grab is his hookshot, so the grab range is incredible far, making this a very dangerous situation. I approached him on the slope of Sector Z and he was right in front of me when he began his grab, then I did something instinctively but paramount.

I ducked. And since we were on the slope the hookshot went inches over Mario’s head. Then I finished it off with a powerful punch to end the match.

But the magic doesn’t stop there.

Absolutely bewildered, my friend belts out “WHAT THE FUCK?? IS THIS REAL LIFE??”

And from the back of the room “OR IS THIS JUST FANTASY”

The next match was played as the entire room burst into Bohemian Rhapsody completely on the spot.

It was magical. Smash Bros is awesome