it works so well on digitals

I’m happy to finally share the piece I did for the @notyourpuppetsfanzine

I had a lot of fun working on this piece even tho it was pretty intimidating considering that this was my first time doing something like this added to the fact that I knew LOTS of amazing artists were also working on the zine.

I also did a sticker design as well

Thank you so much to the working behind the scenes on the project! You guys were amazing!

anonymous asked:

How do you colour your lineart?

My tutorial is for Paint Tool SAI, but this works for Photoshop as well, I believe.

So, what I do is draw the lineart as normal. Whatever colour works for you is fine, but I use black because I can see it better against a white background.

Now go to the panel holding all of your layers (in my case it’s on the right because I like my workspace to be centred on the screen):

There are three boxes that are normally unchecked when you create a new layer, labelled as: preserve opacity, clipping group, and selection source.

Check the box ‘preserve opacity’, which is the top one.

This does a cool little thing that allows you colour the lineart without actually changing how it looks. So after checking the box, just take the pen tool and colour the lineart whatever you want!

I like to colour the lineart the same colour as the base colour to create the illusion of no lineart. For example, when I was colouring John’s face, I made the lineart the same colour as his skintone (as seen above).

I hope this was helpful!

So happy to finally be able to share this! It’s some early concept art of Aloy, the lead character of Horizon: Zero Dawn. I worked on this character together with the rest of the character team for a few months in 2013. It was a huge honor working with Guerrilla Games and their inspiring, talented team. I loved working on this character! These images can be seen in this neat featurette about Aloy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw5JnhbG558, as well as in the artbook that comes with the collector’s edition of the game!

Images © Sony and Guerrilla Games.

2

Petals fall
With every motion
Taking all
Of my emotion

Carried away
By the breeze
Maybe someday
I’ll be at ease
——————

Finally finished my glass flute painting. I’m in the midst of busy moving so there won’t be much for a while. After the move I’m excited to start on Fisheye Placebo and Knite again, as well as continuing the glass instrument series (I think I will do drums next).

I also aim to get a laser cutter and 3D printer to explore art in different mediums. I love digital, but it’s nice to work with something tangible as well :)

2

Viviane and Kallias :)

I loved these two together, & the Winter Court is just so interesting in general.

2

Finally had time to finish this piece from forever ago. I’ve always loved Escher’s mind bending work and I’ve been really into drawing glass lately so it’s only natural to mix the two. I used a free sketchup model of Escher’s stairs as the base for this drawing. You can find tutorials of how I utilize 3D in my drawings on my YuumeiArt.com website. I forgot to record the drawing process for this one in particular, but the concept and process is all the same.

Now that I have bit more time after moving, expect lost more updates soon, and new comics are under way as well! :D

Well, I’m calling it. It’s DONE. 

I started this in October as a personal challenge, and while I clearly didn’t finish it by that time, I am really happy with all the work that I put into it. I definitely learned a lot and can’t wait to use what I learned in my next image, Breath of the Wild~

If you’re going to be at Titancon or AX, come by my table and see it in person! I’m hoping to have the full 24x36 image printed for AX as well, so you can look at all the details I put in! I’ll have more information as those dates get closer~

Realistic Kurro attemp #3
Good morning cuties! Coco here 
So, when I first had my tablet working again, the first thing I drew was Kuroo, because I really missed draw his crazy bed hair and long bottom lashes <3. 
I wanted to do a magazine cover-like picture, I still have to improve my colorig, but I think is great for a firts digital draw after so long! I hope you like it too <3
I want to do some paints more and then I’ll start to do my comics again, so wait for them as well! 
-Watch the Speedpaint!-
See you soon! 
Lots of love, Coco 

Smog mask designs for my upcoming reboot of Knite! :D My team has been working hard the past year on Knite and Fisheye Placebo. We’re super close to finishing up all the 3D models for the big release of new comic chapters. 


For those who missed the news, years ago I hurt my hand from drawing too much, which is why my comics went on hiatus. I decided to hire a team of 3D artists to help me make models of the characters and backgrounds so that I can quickly paint over them to use in my comic. 


These characters are all 3D models made by the super talented @SozoMaika which I then painted over to make them look more natural. There are lots of other talented members of my team working on various other aspects of the story, such as clothing, backgrounds, rigging, rendering, etc. I’m super excited to introduce the full team to everyone soon with new teasers as well!

deal | pt 1 (m)

Originally posted by sugamysavagebaby

summary: the years spent working hard had really paid off and was it so wrong to want to rub that in a few faces? The cliché mean girls that often teased you for not doing anything with your hair or clothing, wouldn’t it be great to show off someone like Jungkook? High school reunion au + ceo!jeon

word count: 6,366 

part two | part three 


Eyes like ice, cold and calculating narrow over the rim of a wine glass. Soft lips press to the polished glass, the crimson complimenting tan skin. If it weren’t for the soft dent between his brows you would have assumed he had not heard you. He takes his time allowing the wine to caress his palate, eyes closed as he savors the taste.  As always, he makes you wait until the wine glass is drained of it’s dark contents. You ponder on the taste, if it is bitter upon his tongue much like his words.

Keep reading

Some Car Boys thoughts

Just wrapped up the finale and like everyone I’m still reeling from it. I wanted to sketch out a few thoughts on the show that hopefully I can return to at some point.

1) This is the best exploration of games in a work of fiction to date and should be a model for filmmakers and writers going forward. Not only does Car Boys explore modern digital gaming, it does so by using one of the most basic forms of a game: improvisational storytelling. The plot and mythology of the show emerges from Nick, Griffin, and the fanbase’s interactions and interpretations of of the game, culminating in that amazing BeamNG.drive title reveal at the end. Actual play podcasts like Adventure Zone and Friends at the Table have tapped into this before, but this is the first time I’ve seen it done so well in a visual medium. Maybe the most exciting thing about Car Boys though, and what I just can’t stop thinking about is that Nick, Griffin, and the fanbase are not the only ones telling the story, they aren’t even the main authors.

2) Car Boys is technology telling a story about itself. Where most stories about technology (Black Mirror, Blade Runner, etc) are by necessity from a human perspective, Car Boys reverses this and offers something new. The main author of Car Boys is BeamNG.drive. The thrust of the plot is driven not by what Nick and Griffin do to the game, but what it does back to them. The glitches and psychedelic imagery are so haunting because they are beyond our control and maybe even our understanding. What is the game doing and how is it doing it? How do I, the player, begin to understand my place in this digital space? How do I understand what this space is and what its for? This is part of what made the ending of the series so touching. Two small storytellers, lost in a digital infinity still finding meaning.

3) Humans have always looked to the heavens and created stories. We see comets and stars and assign them meaning. We create gods and look for life. Car Boys turns our eyes towards some kind of digital heaven and does the same. It is the best exploration of technology I’ve ever seen and I can’t wait to see what Nick and Griffin do next

All It Takes (two)

Bucky x Reader

Summary: It’s not just Bucky who is miserably lusting after you.

Word Count: 1349 | Rating: R 

Warnings: SMUT. Masturbation, one nsfw gif

A/N: okay, that’s a crappy summary. but I hope the content is good enough for y’all 

also sorry for any typos, i’m on the phone.

Masterlist here

All It Takes Part One

(*gifs are not mine!)


From the moment he stepped into your life, you were aware of what all he could do to you. Bucky Barnes was a walking warning himself, a constant reminder for why you cannot be anyone else’s but his. You are head over heels for him and all he has to do is look at you and throw that sexy smirk along with those twinkling blue orbs and you were done for good.

You find yourself daydreaming about him – a lot, often about his lips, how he would roam them all over your body, pressing gentle feather light kisses on your sensitive skin, leaving goosebumps in his wake. How his perfect lips would mould with yours, sucking all the air from your lungs, leaving them red and swollen. How he’d graze the tip of his nose along the underside of your jawline, breathing you in. He’d connect lips on the column of your throat, biting and sucking bruises and it would take him little to no time in discovering that sensitive spot on your neck which makes you release that sweet harmonious noise.

Keep reading

5

PRINTS AVAILABLE ON SOCIETY6 !

 * HERE *


Aaaand, the diaporama of them all together.
My aim was to draw some of my favorite HP caracters doing something relaxing, that they enjoy. Because they have so many dangerous adventures… i wanted to see them having a rest.

So now it’s over -for now- and I’m returning to my work. XD (work is a comic about a love adventure King Francis of France had… Not nearly as fascinating as HP related stuff, but well… at least I turned King Francis into a pretty young man x3)

Beating Brush Lag in Manga Studio

Booooooooo… what is this, Photoshop?!

Lagging brushes are an occasional problem in any illustration software. Here’s a troubleshooting guide for Manga Studio if your tools are acting like molasses. (Some settings may be different on Windows or if you’re running the Clip Studio Paint branding of the software. For what it’s worth, I’m running Manga Studio 5.0.3 on Mac OS 10.7.5. Yup, I’m behind the times.) 


There are a few options to beat the lag: 

1. Quit Stuff
Bye bye, YouTube. See ya, Skype. Later, Tumblr.

Save your computer’s processor by quitting RAM-hogging apps and tasks while painting. Streaming audio/video will drastically reduce performance, but even leaving browsers open can slow things down, so best to just close it up. Guess that rules out Spotify, but then there’s always ye olde Zune. Gotta love cringing through those high school playlists while working.


2. Change Preferences
Easier than changing your mind, and quicker too.

Check under the hood of Manga Studio’s Preferences for a few speed boosts. Do the following in these sub menus:

Preferences/Tablet/Tablet Settings: Change from 1 to 6 (I believe this option is Mac only).

Preferences/Performance/Undo: Lower the Undo count. Try taking it down 10-15 notches from default. You could also turn up that long-titled setting (“Delay before recognizing new object…”) by 100 ms, but I haven’t figured out what that does exactly…

Preferences/Cursor/Display Position of Reversed Cursor: Make sure to check “No Delay”.

After changing preferences, it’s a good idea to close and reopen Manga Studio.


3. Modify Brush Tool Settings
Your brushes may take it personally, but remember you’re in charge here.

The Tool Settings window is a wealth of options for customizing brushes. Some are more processor-intensive than others. Here are a few of the best ones to modify: (Note: the look and behavior of brushes may be affected. You may want to duplicate and/or export a brush before changing its settings.)

Tool Settings/Anti-Aliasing: Turn down to “Little” or “None”

Tool Settings/Brush Tip: Reduce the number of materials on your brush.

Tool Settings/Stroke/Space: Increase spacing, but not too much. Brushes are essentially a string of material stamps. A low space setting means a smoother brush, but more work for your computer. Picture it frantically scrubbing a rubber stamp across your canvas. On that note, also make sure Continuous Spraying is not on.

Tool Settings/Watercolor Border: If your brush uses this setting, turn on the “Process After Drag” option. This renders the effect after each brush stroke and saves computing power.

Tool Settings/Correction: Turn off (or decrease) Stabilization, Post Correction, and Brush Stroke.

Tool Settings/Starting and Ending: Turn off all this stuff. Pfffft, who needs it, right?

Here’s a speed test after fiddling with some settings:

 Woooooooo! We’re getting faster! Still a bit laggy, which leads to one last tip:


4. Rework The Canvas
Might as well rework my life goals too.

Okay, disclosure: The two gifs in this post were recorded on a 4500x3000 canvas at 300dpi with a size 500 brush to emphasize lag. This third one is recorded on a 1080x720 canvas at 72dpi with a size 100 brush:

Yes! We’re cruising now! 

Canvas sizing and resolution has a big affect on brush performance. It’s a bit of a conundrum. Getting the best image quality means working at a minimum resolution of 300dpi, which can be taxing for brushes on large canvases. So what to do? Just like traditional paintings start with thumbnail sketches, digital work can start on a low-resolution canvas. Here’s the method:

Set up your canvas normally at the full target resolution. But before drawing anything on the canvas, use the handy tool under Edit/Change Image Resolution. Reduce Resolution to 72dpi. Use this smaller canvas for rough sketching, background filling, blocking in large areas of color, etc. Then increase resolution to 144dpi for building up the body of the painting, still keeping it loose. (I’d recommend switching Interpolate to Hard Outline when increasing resolution.) Finally, blow it up to full resolution and get into the nitty gritty of rendering. This is where you’ll do the crisp line work, highlights, details, etc.

The idea here is to work big to small. This will keep away brush lag by using large brushes on small canvases. As the canvas resolution increases, decrease brush size and work smaller, tightening things up in the process. NOTE: Increasing canvas resolution causes pixilation. Don’t worry about it. This can be cleaned up in the final stages of painting.


Hope this guide is helpful! If lagging persists, remember to check drivers and tablet settings as well. If all else fails, Google’s a good friend ;)

-Armin

Da, da, da, daaaaaaaa…… that’s a little more dramatic than I had intended. I love all these wonderful Sai tutorials that get posted on here but I haven’t seen much attention payed to Sai’s Lineart tool which I can’t get enough of. I’m sure there probably are Lineart Layer tutorials out there - I just haven’t come across one so I’m just adding to the pile. The Lineart tool is so awesome it deserves any number of tutorials anyway. It’s so easy to use, it saves me so much time, and it offers so much control which I really love. Honestly, the tool is so easy to use that this is less of a tutorial and more of just a general encouragement to just whip it out and start playing with it. Yeah. So say we start with a simple line like this swirly-wirly thingy that I drew with the marker tool. Well, the first step would be to create a linework layer by clicking the linework layer button.

There we go. Now, a lineart layer in Sai is different from any other regular layer in Sai and it will bring up a completely new range of tools. I’m gonna briefly go through them but the best way to understand exactly what each does is to just try them out for yourself. There’s no substitute for experience or however the saying goes.

  • Pen - This is your freehand lineart tool and to best honest I don’t really use it that often. That’s just me personally. I have an expensive gaming rig that has all sorts of magic running under the hood but we all know that Sai’s memory management is pretty crappy and I don’t need the lag or crashes that come with this tool when working at a high DPI. You may have a different, entirely pleasant experience with this particular tool but for me, if I’m doing freehand inking, I’d much rather just use the regular Pencil tool.
  • Eraser - Kinda speaks for itself.
  • Weight - This one I do love. Say you’ve drawn a line - or a path as Sai calls it. With this tool you can adjust the thickness of the particular line by simply selecting the brush size and then clicking on the line.
  • Color - Same as Weight. Simply select your desired colour and then select the desired line you’d like to change. Very useful. For the aesthetic.
  • Edit - This one comes with its own subset of mini-tools that I’ll get into in a moment. But this is definitely a useful tool - for me it’s probably the most useful.
  • Pressure - This is the one that adds the character to your linework. I’ll explain further below.
  • SelPen - A selection tool. Pretty standard. Since the Lineart layer works in ‘Anchor’ points (which again, I’ll get in to further down below) I don’t really use this one.
  • SelErs - Selection Erase. Goes hand in hand with the SelPen. I can’t say that I personally use this one  much.
  • Curve & Line - The Curve and the Line tools are the cornerstones of the Linework layer. I’m explain both further down.

The Edit tool, as I mentioned, brings up its own list of sub-tools. And they definitely have their uses. Again, it’s best to play around with them to truly get a grasp of what they do but I’ll just run through them quickly before I get on with the main tutorial.

  • Select - For selecting anchor points of paths. Honestly, I don’t really use this one too much simply because hovering over a point or path and clicking will select it.
  • Move/Add - Now this one I use a lot. Moving an anchor will affect the curvature of your line if you’ve used the ‘Curve’ tool, or you can add curves to a straight line by clicking and dragging in between anchor points.
  • Delete CP/Curve - Kinda speaks for itself. It will delete an achor point in your line. Sometimes this can be useful for making your curves rounder if you’ve added too many points to it.
  • Deform Path - Again, kinda self explanatory. It will warp your line. I don’t really use this one myself but that’s not to say that it couldn’t have its uses.
  • Deform Anchor - See above.
  • Move Path - Instead of moving just an anchor or adjusting the curvature of your line you can move the entire line at once. Can be useful.
  • Duplicate Path - Does exactly what it says - creates a copy of your line. Haven’t found much use for this simply because I don’t particularly like copy/paste stuff in linework. Faults or differences add character.
  • Delete Path - deletes a line you’ve drawn independently of other lines on your linework layer. Can be useful as well.
  • Connect CPs - This is difficult to explain the benefits of. It’s one that should be experimented with. It basically joins lines together. I use it quite often. Just pick this option and drag from one anchor point to another to join them.
  • Pointed/Rounded - See the diagram below for this one. I find it very useful.

As you can see I used the Curve tool to draw a simple curve (left) and then I used the Pointed/Rounded tool to convert the curve into a point (right) by selecting the tool and then clicking on the anchor point at the height of the curve. I find it very useful. Anyway, back to our swirly-wirly thingy.

Because our swirly-wirly thingy is basically one long curve, I simply select the curve tool and start clicking. Starting at the centre point on one end, I click to add anchor points as I trace the shape of the object. Each point adjusts the curvature from the last point. It’s kinda hard to explain verbally or even visually but try it out and you’ll quickly see how it works.

Once I have a line over whatever I’m inking done I like to adjust the weight to suit my preferences. I like to work with thicker lines because they give more room to play around with weight. So to adjust the weight you click on the Weight tool, select a brush size and then click on your line. If only it were that simple in life.

Once I have a good weight selected I move on to the Pressure tool. The pressure tool gives you two options. Pressure for width and pressure for density. Width is like controlling the weight of the line at individual points and density controls the transparency. I don’t usually use the density option. As with traditional inking I prefer to denote depth, shadow, etc. with weight as you can see in the image above. To adjust the pressure, simply select the pressure tool and then select an anchor point. Click, hold and drag to the left to make the line thinner of more transparent and to the right to make the line thicker and more dense. As you drag, a percentage will appear over the anchor point you’ve selected. This can be useful for keeping things consistent.

That’s all well and good for curved lines but what about straight lines? That’s where the line tool comes in. It works exactly the same way except it won’t add a curvature to your anchor pints. Still very useful though. Especially when combined with the Weight and Pressure tools.

Here’s an example of one my drawings. It’s Dark Empress Kitana from Mortal Kombat. The one in red is the pencils which if converted to black would probably make a pretty good linework layer. I’m a firm believer in taking the time to clean up your sketch/pencils layer because it will dictate your entire drawing. The one below in black was done using Sai’s linework layer feature. Although not entirely.

As much as I love Sai’s linework layer, it can look a little too clean which is not great when you’re drawing people. Although, it’s all art so it’s all up to personal preferences and personal style. There’s no wrong way to do it. For me though, I prefer to do skin, facial features, hair, etc. by hand using Sai’s Pencil tool on a normal layer and reserve the Linework Layer for architecture, clothing or any non-organic substances. I inked Kitana’s eyes and eyebrows freehand ( or as freehand as you can be with Sai’s amazing stabilisers) but everything else such as her armour or her fan weapon thingy was done using the Curve and Line tools on the Linework Layer.

I hope this tutorial has been useful. Or if not useful - then at least encouring to try out Sai’s linework layer. It’s such a robust feature that I don’t see get much attention and I can’t even begin to describe how much time it saves me or how much I adore it. If you have any questions (because I’m well aware how unsuited I am to writing tutorials - this is so damn rambly - sorry!) then feel free to drop me an ask here at keithbyrneart.

P.S, sorry about my handwriting in the stills. It’s gotten a lot messier these days.