it is not the be all end all of feminism in a media

i’m sure this has all been said before but it’s so fucking tiring to read article after article and post after post by straight (or even just non-lesbian) feminists waxing poetic about the bechdel test. like yeah, obviously it’s indicative of a massive issue w the representation of women in media and a useful tool to gauge the failings of hollywood and big time show writers or whatever

but that wasn’t what it was fucking intended for. it was never about all women, it was about the lesbian experience. it was about the overwhelming loneliness of the lesbian identity and how far removed you feel from media. i feel this every day, and i have for the last decade that i’ve been out

it’s infuriating to watch straight women talk about the bechdel test at all (“my show is different – even though they’re talking about men, the story is about their friendship. it’s like turning the bechdel test on its head”) and even MORESO when they’re fucking criticizing it (“the bechdel test isn’t the end all be all… films can still be feminist and not pass it. films that don’t pass can be even more feminist than films that do!”)

it’s like…. the name of the fucking strip has the word “dyke” in it. have you all ever considered once that the original comic wasn’t ever meant for your consumption at all? have you ever thought about the fact that alison bechdel was writing as a lesbian about her lesbian experiences and that maybe, just maybe, this isn’t some generic feminist concept but instead a description of a lesbian-specific experience?

and the thing is that the liberal feminist application of the bechdel test has been criticized for not being intersectional – which it isn’t! movies about gay men and men of color are still incredibly groundbreaking and significant to our culture even though they “fail” the bechdel test

and that is LITERALLY BECAUSE the bechdel test wasn’t ever fucking MEANT to be the Generic Feminism Test Of Diversity And Equality – it was commentary specific to the lesbian experience when engaging with media

straight feminists historically hated and excluded lesbian feminists (and many do to this day lmao) but still, as always, want to co-opt and misappropriate our writing, concepts, and experiences to suit their needs

Why Wonder Woman was so Important to Me

I had the opportunity to see Wonder Woman recently, and I was left awestruck.  Wonder Woman is such a timeless character, and I feel this story and the way the film was made really captured the heart of the original character.  With DC’s track record, it had a high chance of being lazy and bad.  But it wasn’t.  It was original. Refreshing. I cried a lot, and here’s why.

1. Women Are Strong 

I’m not one to loudly complain about the misrepresentation of women in media (though we often are).  We’ve had some really awesome and strong female characters over the past couple years.  But somehow, Wonder Woman took this in a completely new direction.  Watching the Amazons fight the invaders on the beach nearly brought me to tears.  It was so special for me to see women take on roles we rarely see them in.  They were the fighters, the protectors, the providers.  There are many women out in the world right now who are fighting their own battles, much like the Amazons.  They’re providing for their families or serving their countries through the military.  It was a pleasant reminder that while men and women have differences, they are equally strong and skilled.

(Also yay for a female director!)

2. Actions Speak Louder

Many times, Wonder Woman is questioned.  She’s scoffed at for being a women (which would have been very common during that time).  She’s underestimated.  But what’s so amazing here is that she never has to prove herself to the men.  It would’ve been so easy for the movie to fall into that common trope.  She never argues with a man and she focuses her attention on others instead of herself.  She wants to kill Ares and stop the war. And in the end, her actions speak louder then her words ever could.  What I took from this is to rise to action.  Stop talking and start doing.  Ignore what others say, because you know what you can do.  Hold your head high and rise above.

3. Mutual Respect Brings the Most Success

As I said before, it would have been easy for the film to fall into certain tropes.  A trope we often see nowadays is a woman proving that she (or all women) are better then men.  That’s never a point of conflict in this film.  Her love interest, Steve, fights as her equal.  He isn’t clumsy or weak to make Wonder Woman look stronger.  He believes in her and helps her to the best of his ability. When they become interested in each other romantically, they both hold their own.  They love each other but are not dependent on one another.  We see the rest of the men in their gang react the same way later on.  They all eventually come to love and respect Diana.  It’s a great reminder that feminism is about collaboration and equality, not one gender being better then the other.  We each have something to bring to the table and our differences are what makes us stronger. 

4. It’s Okay to not be Okay

There’s a really interesting character in Wonder Woman’s gang named Charlie.  He’s supposed to be the world’s top shooter, but time and time again he fails.  He seen some things that have damaged him pretty heavily.  What’s really interesting about this character is that we never see this issue resolved.  He doesn’t have his big “hero moment” where he is suddenly able to shoot and save the day.  This is so much like real life.  We’ve all been hurt, and it’s ok to be damaged.  You have nothing to prove, but your great efforts will help everything to turn out right in the end.  At one point, Charlie even says to Diana “You don’t need me, you’re better of without me.” To this she replies “No, Charlie, if you’re not here, who will sing?” This implies that Charlie is still a valued member of the group, despite his shortcomings.  His friends are able to recognize his other strengths when he cannot.  


5. There is Much Darkness in the World, But Love Will Save the Day

Not much to say here, as Diana said it all in her own monologue:

“I used to want to save the world, to end war and bring peace to mankind. But then I glimpsed the darkness that lives within their light. I learnt that inside every one of them there will always be both. The choice each must make for themselves - something no hero will ever defeat. And now I know… that only love can truly save the world. So now I stay, I fight, and I give - for the world I know can be. This is my mission now, for ever.”

Often times love is portrayed as a great weakness. But it isn’t.  To love is to truly see beauty in the world.  To love is to be brave and strong.  Love is the greatest power of all.  

Additional Notes:

We must learn to forgive.  Diana had the opportunity to kill the chemist responsible for Steve’s death.  And she chose not too, instead focusing on the larger problem at hand and in turn leaving the past in the past.

There were not gratuitous or sexualized shots of the women in the film.  The framing was based around the action.  The women were all beautiful, but the film relied on it’s story and the strength of it’s lead rather then her beauty. 

There will always be hardship. There isn’t always one bad guy to fight.  We all will have to continue to fight our demons and endure through our trials.  But it’s the light and the love, those precious moments, that we fight for.

Thanks Wonder Woman.  You inspired me, and I’m so grateful.  I don’t think I’ve seen a superhero movie with more heart.  There will be many days ahead where I think “What would Wonder Woman do?” 

*I may edit and add on to more of this at a later time, but I wanted to get my initial thoughts out!

Marco is a Trans Girl - The Megapost 2.0

So you’ve likely seen my big post on the theory that Marco Diaz from Star vs The Forces of Evil is a Trans Girl. It was made back in July of 2016 when Season 2 was just starting, and since then a lot of things have changed and we now know a lot more about what’s going on behind the scenes.

This post is meant to be an updated explanation of Trans Girl Marco theory, but now more in line with how things are actually happening. The gist of it being that Marco Diaz is coded as a closeted transgender girl.  Expect less theorizing and more meta talk. I’ll be going over all the clues that indicate Marco is trans, as well as how the starcrew came to the desicion as Marco developed as a character.

I can’t give enough thanks to the members of the crew such as @arythusa and @hug-bees​, whom have both done as much as they possibly can to communicate with the show’s growing LGBT fanbase, and given us so much insight into what’s going on

Full post below the cut.

Keep reading

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jenmorrisonlive Day 101: Emma’s wedding gown! So much love and thought went into this dress. Just as #onceuponatime pulls from fairytales and literature - for the wedding, Eddy, Adam, Edwardo, and I felt it would be wonderful to pull from the real life fairytale of Grace Kelly. It is a dress that represents the elegance and simplicity of classic timeless strength mixed with the delicacy of feminity and vulnerability. It is the ultimate balance that Emma has been fighting for throughout the 6 seasons. A wholeness. A balance. Not all one thing or another - But rather, a moment that is genuinely, truly, authentically her without barriers and walls. A woman surrounded by people she loves and is loved by, willing to fight to protect them all as well as herself. The joy of a timeless balance. So honored to wear such a beautiful gown. Edwardo and his team created a piece of art once again. The perfect way to end this round of #101smiles #emmaswan  #wedding #uglyducklings   (x)

 Does It Pass The Aila Test?

We all know the rules of The Bechdel Test. In recent years, fans of more feminist-friendly films have included their own character tests, like The Mako Mori Test, The Furiosa Test, The Sexy Lamp Test, the list goes on. While these are all helpful (though comical) tools feminists have used to criticize media narratives, very few of them seem to empower or apply when viewing Indigenous and Aboriginal women in media narratives / storytelling.

As a Native woman, I’ve experienced disappointment and heartache from the way Native women were represented on film, television, cartoons, and other forms of media. From stereotypical “Indian princesses” to the distressing amount of physical and sexual violence in live action period pieces, it felt that a Native woman was not a character you were meant to love and root for. She was never a character you were supposed to relate to or want to be. In almost every role she’s in, she cannot exist without being a prop for another character’s story, and if she has a “happy ending,” it’s usually in the arms of a white colonist or settler.

I’ve created the Aila Test to bring my own concerns to the table when feminists criticize media. Not only should these issues be analyzed and addressed, but content creators who write about Indigenous / Aboriginal women should consider writing characters who pass this test. We need them now, more than ever.

To pass the Aila Test, your film / animation / comic book / novel / etc, must abide by these three important rules:

1. Is she an Indigenous / Aboriginal woman who is a main character…

2. Who  DOES NOT fall in love with a white man…

3. And DOES NOT end up raped or murdered at any point in the story.

Do you know characters that pass the Aila Test? Please submit them to this page!

anonymous asked:

You said its much more interesting to have a character try to fit into their role and fail then a princess character who automatically rebels. Can you tell me more about it and what makes it interesting? I really like your insight when it comes to stories and fairytales.

Ah! Thank you! Well, I really dislike the ‘Rebellious Princess’ narrative for three reasons, and I’ll just go into them below before talking about more interesting approaches

  1. It’s Classist

This is the most obvious issue. Your hero is a rebel princess, born into a life of status and privilege. She is the 1%.

You remember this comic making its rounds on social media? 

Your rebel Princess is Richard.

Every time the Princess laments that she’s trapped by her own wealth and status, she ignores the fact that her problems are minute and petty in the grander narrative. Princesses are inherently privileged, and it’s ignorant to ignore their own wealth in favour of chasing some bohemian ‘freedom’. 

We get it, kiddo. You hate needlework and you don’t want to be Queen. But your kingdom is in the middle ages, people eat dirt and no one is happy. The Princess might yearn for some vague concept of ‘something more’, but that’s myopic and selfish when her people yearn for electricity and proper sanitation. 

I have extreme difficulty enjoying Star vs the Forces of Evil.

2. It pits the hero against other women to make her rebellion look good. 

So you have your Princess who rejects the institution of traditional femininity. All well and good. But in order for her to be rebellious, there must be an institution in the first place for her to reject.

Enter The Institution. Call her St Olga’s Reform School for Wayward Princesses, call her Prudence, or Marina Del Rey. No matter what she looks or acts like, you know you’ve seen her before. She’s prudish, traditionally feminine, tough as nails, and probably sews her own ballgowns on her weekends off. 

She is a perfectly good woman in any other sense, but since she’s everything your princess doesn’t want to be, conflict has to arise from the princess fighting her and her ideals. 

And of course, the princess will win, because traditional femininity is evil. 

Oh, Prudence, you deserved so much more than the Disney Sequel you got.

In a feminist world there’s nothing wrong with fighting old ideas of what women should act like - but in a postmodern feminist world, one must be aware that some women willingly are quite happy to be traditionally feminine, and some don’t have the luxury of choice to pick whatever kind of femininity they embody.

Pitting the ‘feminist’ rebel princess against traditionally feminine women is a microaggression in itself: we have never needed to sell men an empowerment narrative by pitting men against each other, so why start here? Also note that Disney is extremely fond of this, especially in marketing Frozen and its reboot movies by saying it’s better than ‘classic princess’ movies because ‘classic princesses’ needed men:

“That’s a bit different from the animation, I think, it’s not about Cinderella just being rescued by a man.”  

3. It’s a White-Feminist narrative. 

Oh GOD is it a White-Feminist narrative!

I said before that some woman don’t have the luxury to be rebel princesses, and some willingly want to be traditionally femme. This is especially so in POC cultures. 

In Chinese culture, the concept of filial piety is a very important one: to be dutiful and respectful to your parents, and placing your family’s honour and their values above your own. 

Mulan does not have the luxury of ‘rebellion’. Rebellion would dishonour her family, rebellion would shame her parents. Mulan’s entire character arc exists to teach her to balance her parent’s needs with her own, and it ends with her bestowing her war prizes to her father - at the height of her own glory she doesn’t forget where she came from - and it’s the greatest show of honour she could possibly give.

To turn Mulan into a rebel princess would be to undermine everything her culture and the folklore surrounding her represents. A lot of these themes are repeated in Moana - how much of yourself do you give up to make your parents happy? What is the true meaning of tradition? When you exist for other people can you still know who you are? 

Originally posted by tarajis

Moana is great. Watch it. 

Making White Feminist statements like ‘my princesses isn’t like a classic princess! she feminist and doesnt need to listen to anyone!’ does a massive disservice to other cultures who have to balance force of will with filial piety. 

So, about those Interesting Narratives…

Originally posted by a-dark-and-terrible-thing

Pans Labyrinth (2006) is thematically about ‘rebellion’ - it’s set in the Spanish Civil War and half of its narrative is about fighting a military dictatorship. It’s other half is about Ofelia (a fairy changeling), who is given instructions so that she can return to the magical world. Ofelia proceeds to mess all of them up: she eats from a magical table when she’s told to take no food, she refuses to kill an infant to open a gate to her homeworld. While excited to be a princess, Ofelia struggles to cope with the morally dubious or downright strange demands she’s presented with. Her rebellion isn’t a girl with a weapon in her hand: it’s a girl who legitimately wants to be a princess but isn’t cruel enough to do what it takes to get there.  

I wanted to give others - and they are plenty - but this post has gone on long enough. ;w; Do come back to me if you want to know more, anon! I’m overjoyed to be able to talk about this!

Unfortunately black women (including myself) continue to support and/or listen to rap/hip hop music which refers to them as bitches and hoes, yet whenever a rapper exhibits misogynoir outside of his music, we take to social media to drag him. We get outraged, while other men defend him (because that’s what men in our community do, they defend each other’s misogynoir so they can continue to profit off of our oppression) but in the end we still actively consume content that objectifies, sexualizes, and degrades black women. The normalization of misogynoir in our culture and community is unacceptable. I’m tired of hearing “That’s just how rap is” or the deflections and think pieces about how rock is just as damaging as rap/hip hop. When are we going to address the elephant in the room, that rap/hip hop has encouraged and propagated some of the most damaging images and caricatures of black women? When are we going to hold rappers accountable for their rampant colorism?(Consistently portraying lighter skin women as the end all be all, the ultimate standard of beauty, while dark skin women are merely props for hyper-sexualization.) As black women when do we have these conversations and decide that enough is enough? Instead of accepting hypocritical and inconsistent misrepresentations of ourselves, when do we decide to take control of our own image and leave toxic black media behind?

White men have been getting a bad rap lately. They are constantly told that they are the world’s oppressors and the world would be a lot better off without these problematic, potential rapists around. Other races and genders roll their eyes at them and say things such as “dear white people” in a tone that implies they’re going to explain their wrongdoings to them one last time. 

I never really thought of white males as anything extraordinary until everyone said it’s a terrible thing to be one. After looking it up, turns out they’re pretty great - maybe not “supreme,” but definitely a combination of race and gender we owe a lot to.

White men create and maintain the world’s most prosperous and desirable countries. Majority-white counties do an absolutely brilliant job at creating and maintaining the cleanest, safest, high-income, low-corruption, politically stable, and technologically innovative societies on the planet. They make up the top 10 most prosperous in the world and top 18 happiest, healthiest and most advanced. The only countries who are more prosperous than us are countries with even greater percentages of whites.

It’s no wonder a huge percentage of the planets population would jump at the first opportunity to come and live in one of these “white supremacies.” There are certainly a few major non-white first world exceptions out there who get ranked around the 20th mark for most prosperous (Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong) but these countries are primarily the way they are through adopting Western technologies and systems of government and laws. Immigration to these countries is also almost non-existent, while all the white majority countries are major migration destinations for non-white people around the world seeking a better life.

“White Supremacy”? It’s more like white competency than anything else. And competency is a virtue that should cherished and praised. Not derided.

White males make up only a tiny fraction of the population of the planet, but have been, and continue to be, at the forefront of the vast majority of the world’s scientific, medical, and technological advancements for 500+ years. Japan, Korea, and China could very well still be lingering in a 13th century standard of living if not for increased contact with the West starting in the 1800’s, and western medicine has added decades to the average life expectancy of all races of people across the globe. Can’t live without your phone, computer, car, antibiotics, medicine, electricity, internet, eyeglasses, refrigeration, GPS, satellites and yes, even the toilet? White people say, you’re welcome. 

Now, I know what the racists are thinking. Sure, some white man innovations have been created for destruction, but for every V-2 rocket there is a Saturn V, for every attack helicopter there is a rescue helicopter, and for every nuclear bomb there is an asteroid in space which could be obliterated before it has a chance to destroy Earth. The innovations of white men have brought far more health and happiness to people around the world than their negatives, so cultural Marxists and all the “white privilege” brow-beaters are more than welcome to move to a Madagascar mud hut if they really can’t stand anything white or western. You aren’t going to be missed.

Cultural Marxists, feminists, and other poorly informed left-wing activists love to keep espousing that white males have historically been the most “violent” or the most “oppressive” race of men on the planet. However, this is entirely untrue. It is in fact Asians who have been responsible for the lion’s share of the highest death toll conflicts in human history, and the Japanese, Mongols, and Chinese are well represented in the four most deadly. Even today, where are the only places in the world who are still run by bloodthirsty dictators, where their people are so oppressed they can’t smile without being executed, where rape, slavery, killing gays and marrying children are legal? It sure as fuck isn’t coming from white people and that’s precisely why everyone ignores it. 

The big news media continues to push garbage claims that whites are uniquely racist above all others. On an even more ridiculous note, they may even claim that non-whites can’t be racist at all, because the world is a “white supremacy”. White majority countries all across the world are the most tolerant and the most accepting of living amongst people with different cultures and backgrounds, while countries in the Middle East and Southeast Asia are deemed the least accepting. 

A recent study found that Jordan and India are the two most racist countries in the world followed by Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Korea, Turkey, Bulgaria, Algeria, Morocco, Mali, Zambia, Thailand, Malaysia, The Philippines, Bangladesh, Hong Kong. But sure, keep telling us how racist and intolerant the United States is. Furthermore, only white majority countries take in huge numbers of immigrants and refugees, while the wealthy Northeast Asian countries (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan) scoff at such humanitarianism. Are you going to go to their airports and chant to let them in?

Also, let’s talk about slavery. Not only have left wingers and the mainstream media purposefully chosen to avoid any kind of discussion of the Arab slave trade, the slave trades of North Africa, Egypt, China, Pakistan, for example or even the slavery that’s still going on today. India has 18 million slaves, China 3 million, Pakistan 2 million, Bangladesh, North Korea, Nigeria, Uzbekistan, Mauritania, Congo, Iran, Turkey, Egypt - all hold millions of slaves today but whites are told to feel guilty and ashamed because about 2% of white Americans owned slaves 200 years ago? White males have made more contributions to ending slavery across the world than any other group of people but they still get blamed as if they were the ones responsible for slavery. Every race has been on either side of slavery and yes, that includes white people once being slaves too. Africa started it, white guys ended it.

Britain abolished slavery throughout the British Empire with the Slavery Abolition Act 1833, the French colonies abolished it in 1848, and the U.S. abolished slavery in 1865 with the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Brazil was the last European colony to do so in 1888. Compare that to the far East, where chattel slavery was a legal part of Chinese culture until 1910 and slavery continued in much of the Islamic world well into the 20th century. It was gradually outlawed and suppressed in Muslim lands largely due to pressure exerted from western nations like Britain and France, you know, white guys.

Despite all the humiliation, browbeating, and derision that white males are experiencing in the west today, they have a reputation of brushing themselves off and continuing to get on with being the world’s inventors and peacemakers. Despite knowing that popular culture, hiring practices, and so many different media outlets and national institutions are against their wellbeing, they’re not the ones raising hell, starting riots or shooting five black police officers. They don’t waste their time with White Men’s Marches, they smile, go to work and continue to lead by example. 

Yes, while white men may have been behind a lot of the bad in the world, so has every other race. The difference is, they’re also behind pretty much everything that is great and vital to us today. That’s what happens when you create the modern world. 

STOP asking for more Firefly




STAHP. There is no other way to start this.  I loved Firefly and even more I adored Serenity.  I took the day off school and saw every screening of Serenity that day.  By the end of opening weekend I had seen the film seven times.  Total I ended up seeing that film about 12 times in theaters.  Even more in life.  Firefly was the shit.  Firefly was that thing I couldn’t love more for so long.  

Firefly, as it turns out, has a lot of problems.  Especially if you are a hashtag woke person.  There are really great elements.  The actors live and breathe these characters and if they were to come back to them today those actors could likely embrace those rolls once again.  But like I said, there are a bunch of problems.  

Let’s go with the big one.  Firefly is a big universe about the idea of what if American and Chinese cultures merged.  If after all is said and done, the only cultures that survive moving out to space was American(Mostly white) and Chinese cultures.  So why is it that casual fans don’t know this.  Why is it that most people who know this only know it because someone told them, or because Joss mentioned it in the special features of Firefly’s original DVD set way back in 2003?  

It’s almost as if there is something missing.  Something Key.  Oh, I meant someone.  That someone being FUCKING CHINESE PEOPLE.  You don’t get to just call two characters who are white with white parents the last name Tam.  White Skin is not the mixture of other races.  

Actually, other than Book and Zoe, where are the other people of color?   This is a genuine problem because not only are all of the speaking roles in the show pretty much just white people, so are the background players.  It is really quite strange.  If it was just the core worlds, I’d maybe understand it because the Alliance would definitely support Eugenics, but it is quite the weird situation.  

If you didn’t realize that Book was the magical negro and that Zoe was a stereotypical violent Black Woman, time for you to go to your room and learn about looking at non-white characters in media works.  

I know that a lot of people Love Joss.  They love that he is this self-proclaimed feminist and he’s all about these great female characters.  But he doesn’t like to talk about race.  He doesn’t like to really talk about sexual orientation*.  He doesn’t really like to talk about Trans characters.  I’m not just talking about he as a person, but the works he produces.  And when he touches on any of these subjects, it’s the lightest of touches and it really isn’t a big exploration so much as the media equivalent of click bait.  

Again, look at Firefly.  That is a whole fuck ton of straight characters, and a Bi Sex worker.  Whose Bi-ness only comes up when they want a joke for a male character, and not development for Inara.  But, Inara is a great reason why I’m glad the show never kept going.  Fun Fact:  Joss originally wanted to do a story about a drug that Inara takes.  This drug would kill anyone that rapes the person who takes it.  They were going to have Inara kidnapped by Reavers and when she was found, they would all be dead because of this drug.  Yes, Joss wanted to have the Sex Worker in the future where Sex Workers are super respected gang raped.  He thought this was a progressive and edgey story.  Then again, he set up a future where Sex Workers are respected and everything is done to keep them out of danger, and has the “likable” main character Mal slut shame her at every chance, while he was totally willing to slut around with YoSaffBridge and Nandi.  Again “Progressive”.  

And isn’t it so progressive that they have white people pepper in Chinese into their dialogue only for most of that dialogue just to be nonsensical cursing?  Or very basic thank yous or calling someone sister.  So progressive.  

So everytime you ask for more Firefly you are asking for more of this shit.   Personally?  I want something knew that doesn’t have to live with that baggage.  If Joss really wants to make a scifi feminism show, he needs to learn about TransWomen and including more women of color as leads.  One is not good enough.  

With that said, one of my favorite fan theories is that Firefly, Blade Runner, Alien, and Predator all exist in the same amalgam universe.  

What?

Just because I hate on the fandom and think the creator has a long way to go to get better, doesn’t mean I don’t still have some love for this very flawed work.  

I’ve been grappling with how to challenge cynicism in a moment that requires all of us to show up differently.

On Saturday, I joined more than a million women in Washington, D.C., to register my opposition to the new regime. Participating in the Women’s March — if you count satellite protests around the country, the largest one-day mobilization in the history of the United States — was both symbolic and challenging.

Like many other black women, I was conflicted about participating. That a group of white women had drawn clear inspiration from the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, yet failed to acknowledge the historical precedent, rubbed me the wrong way. Here they go again, I thought, adopting the work of black people while erasing us.

I’d had enough before it even began. 53% of white women who voted in the 2016 presidential election did so for a man who aims to move society backward. Were white women now having buyer’s remorse? Where were all of these white people while our people are being killed in the streets, jobless, homeless, over incarcerated, under educated? Are you committed to freedom for everyone, or just yourselves?

For weeks, I sat on the sidelines. I saw debates on list-serves about whether or not to attend the march, the shade on social media directed at the “white women’s march.” Unconvinced that white women would ever fight for the rights of all of us, many decided to sit the march out.

Yet as time went on and the reality of the incoming Donald Trump administration sank in, something began to gnaw at me. Do I believe that a mass movement is necessary to transform power in this country? Do I believe that this mass movement must be multi-racial and multi-class? Do I believe that to build that mass movement, organizing beyond the choir is necessary? If I believe all of these things, how do we get there and what’s my role in making it happen?

I decided to challenge myself to be a part of something that isn’t perfect, that doesn’t articulate my values the way that I do and still show up, clear in my commitment, open and vulnerable to people who are new in their activism. I can be critical of white women and, at the same time, seek out and join with women, white and of color, who are awakening to the fact that all lives do not, in fact, matter, without compromising my dignity, my safety and radical politics.

In the end, I joined an estimated 1 million people who participated in the Washington, D.C. march and the estimated 3 million who marched around the world. I have participated in hundreds of demonstrations, but this was one of the first times where I didn’t know or know of most of the people there.

Sandwiched between other protesters like a sardine in a can, I spoke with demonstrators in the crowd who said this was their first time participating in a mass mobilization. I saw people for whom this wasn’t their first time at a demonstration, but who thought that the days of protesting for our rights was over. I asked them what brought them there. They said they wanted to stand up for all of us. They realized that they, too, were under attack. They wanted to live in a world where everyone was valued, safe and taken care of. They were in awe of just how many people were there, just like them, to oppose the values of President Donald Trump’s administration. They wanted to do something besides feel hopeless.

That evening, I participated in a town hall meeting that drew more than 700 people and had more than 1,100 on the waiting list. Those gathered were mostly white, though there were also people of color present. About half the room said that the Women’s March was the first time they’d participated in a mass mobilization. They were willing to learn about how change happens and how they could be involved. And that was just the beginning.

Checking my social media feed that evening, I read comment after comment dismissing the march — an experience that was transformative for hundreds of thousands of people. I wondered what would have happened if, instead of inviting people in, I’d told people to fuck off and go home. Would they come back? Did it matter if they didn’t?

Anger has an important place in transforming our political consciousness, and should be valued as such. The white lady with the pink, knitted “pussy” hat that came to the march was angry as hell when her future president talked about grabbing women by the pussy. Though she may have been sitting on the sidelines up until now, she decided that she was going to do something about it. Anger at the way America depends on immigrant labor yet forces undocumented immigrants to live in the shadows may lead them to join the movement. Black Americans mad as hell about the ways that this country strips us of our humanity might join the movement, even though they didn’t before.

I agree with Solange when she says, “I got a lot to be mad about, and I have a right to be mad.” But that anger is not enough. It is insufficient to build or take power. Anger will not change the fact that Republicans have taken control of all three branches of government and control both chambers of the legislature in 32 states. Anger will not stop vigilantes from terrorizing our communities, and anger will not change an economy that deems too many of us as disposable.

More than a moral question, it is a practical one. Can we build a movement of millions with the people who may not grasp our black, queer, feminist, intersectional, anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist ideology but know that we deserve a better life and who are willing to fight for it and win?

If there was ever a time to activate our organizer super powers, this is it. I’m not going to argue that black people or other people of color need to stop holding white people accountable. White people are not going anywhere, but neither are we if we don’t start to think and do differently.

Hundreds of thousands of people are trying to figure out what it means to join a movement. If we demonstrate that to be a part of a movement, you must believe that people cannot change, that transformation is not possible, that it’s more important to be right than to be connected and interdependent, we will not win.

If our movement is not serious about building power, then we are just engaged in a futile exercise of who can be the most radical.

This is a moment for all of us to remember who we were when we stepped into the movement — to remember the organizers who were patient with us, who disagreed with us and yet stayed connected, who smiled knowingly when our self-righteousness consumed us.

I remember who I was before I gave my life to the movement. Someone was patient with me. Someone saw that I had something to contribute. Someone stuck with me. Someone did the work to increase my commitment. Someone taught me how to be accountable. Someone opened my eyes to the root causes of the problems we face. Someone pushed me to call forward my vision for the future. Someone trained me to bring other people who are looking for a movement into one.

No one is safe from the transition this country is undergoing. While many of us have faced hate, ignorance and greed in our daily lives, the period that we have entered is unlike anything that any of us has ever seen before.

We can build a movement in the millions, across difference. We will need to build a movement across divides of class, race, gender, age, documentation, religion and disability. Building a movement requires reaching out beyond the people who agree with you. Simply said, we need each other, and we need leadership and strategy.

We can tell people a hundred times over that because they haven’t been here, they have no right to be here now. But I promise that the only place that will get us is nowhere.

— Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter. Our cynicism will not build a movement. Collaboration will.

follow @the-movemnt

alright so i know i ought to take a break for the sake of my own health at this point (and by health i mean skincare cause yall give me acne) but i’m terrible at shutting up. so one last thing:

the fact that the majority of you seem to think that me speaking out against the bullshit and micro-aggressive behavior black girls like me have to face in this fandom is simply more ammo to ‘defend yourself against’ in this stupid ship war is truly hilarious, but also infuriating.

me saying that kallura is not the worst thing in the world is me defending ALLURA, my favorite character in this show, first and foremost.

princess allura is a black girl character unlike one i have ever seen in mainstream media before.

~ i go into detail about that here and this same topic was even discussed in a ‘black girl nerds’ article here 

but anyone who knows me, and follows my other sideblog fuckin knows that i’d been hoping to see keith and lance be happy boyfriends in a wholesome and romantic relationship on screen since before this fandom could decide on a ship name for them. i’m fuckin GAY, you weirdos. no duh i understand how groundbreaking klance being canon would be. it’d mean the sun and the moon to non-straight people of color everywhere, including my own damn self.

but the fact is that this fandom took the wonderful concept that is “klance” and perverted it and toxified it AND have been using faux progressive arguments to use this ship as a reason to shit on allura — who again, is a character that means a lot to black and brown girls in this fandom for myriads of reasons. so yes, fuck all of you from the bottom of my gay black girl heart 💞 !!

and i don’t speak for any other black girl but myself, so if you’re mad about this perspective take it up with me, you cowards. don’t bother any other black girls in this fandom, my inbox is open.

kallura may never be canon. who fuckin knows. who fuckin cares. neither will some of the few truly wholesome ships in this hell fandom like hunk x keith or hunk x lance or nyma x shay. does it really fuckin matter? as long as the ship isn’t normalizing abuse or pedophilia, let people ship what they want. god.

and no, kallura is not toxic, you guys can’t even decide why you hate it. and that’s exactly what this post is about.

i defend kallura occasionally on this blog solely because this is an ALLURA BLOG. and kallura is the one ship involving allura that actually has some potential to happen on screen. if you want to reduce everything i say as me participating in your dumbass ship war, then go ahead. i couldn’t spare one fuck.

anyway. popular anti-kallura arguments and my response to them all under the cut. all in one tidy text post for easy consumption — screencaps included cause i’m a perfectionist and i want all my posts to look nice ^^

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We're Not Cis Boys and We Never Will Be

Pro-tip: If you aren’t a trans woman don’t think that you are capable of knowing how we’re treated as children. You will literally be wrong every time because you don’t know. Trans girls =/= cis boys. We don’t internalize things the same way, we don’t get treated the same, and it’s absolutely asinine to say that we are somehow privileged by the very thing that is actually killing us.

The argument that trans girls are male privileged because people can mistake us to be cis boys makes about as much sense as saying a lesbian is privileged because she can be mistaken for being straight. We still have a deep seated internal identity of female. We are still bombarded by cultural messages about women through numerous mediums and we still internalize those messages as women. [TW for sexual assault in the links] Growing up as a trans girl can be incredibly traumatic, That trauma and systemic oppression is directly caused by patriarchy and how we are mistaken for men. It literally can not be a function of male privilege. We can not be privileged by one of the things that traumatizes us.

For a similar example, I’m parsed everyday as a cis woman. Are you going to tell me that I have cis privilege because I look like a cis woman and people treat me as one if I don’t out myself? I still have dysphoria. I still see the transmisogyny in media without end. I am still effected by transmisogynistic laws. The bottom line is that I am still trans and I can not escape that, no matter how I look, I am oppressed by transmisogyny. Just like how just because I am a femme does not mean I have het privilege cause I don’t “look like a lesbian”. I am still oppressed by lesbophobia.

We don’t become trans, or stop being cis. For many of us we have been and always will be trans girls. If you are trying to hold trans girls accountable for something that we have never held you are being a transmisogynist.

The idea that privilege solely stems from how other people perceive you is almost only used to talk about trans people and that alone should be an obvious tell that a lie is being told. This also all ties deeply into the socialization “debate”. If you wouldn’t say “het raised lesbian”, or “able raised disabled person”, or “sexual raised asexual” why on earth do you think it’s okay to call trans women “male raised”?

It should be blatantly obvious how suspicious that is. Maybe it’s because I’m a trans woman who gets to live this daily but it shouldn’t be that hard to figure out that for no other group do you suddenly talk about how others having perceived them makes them less of X social class. Obviously you might talk about how compared to others in a group someone might benefit from not being read a certain way, like I’m less at risk for a public confrontation because I “look like a cishet” woman. That doesn’t negate my membership to the social classes of transgender and lesbian though.

Stop assuming that all trans women were “raised cis”. No we’re not cis people and we weren’t raised like cis people because we internalize things differently. If individual trans women feel that they were raised as a cis boy and need to work on their male socialization good for them but stop painting that as the norm. It’s not accurate and it’s incredibly harmful. We’re not cis boys and we never will be.

8

Art School | Jenna Blazevich (Chicago,IL)

Designer and founder of Vichcraft Design Studio, Jenna Blazevich took the road less travelled–by ditching an offer to work her dream job–to pursue her own passion and creative freedom. Jenna’s designs are bold, clean and smart as well as technically and aesthetically masterful. Vichcraft Design Studio has allowed her to bring feminist works to the forefront, creating a  platform for important issues and topics. We’re so excited to have her on board for another year of Babes Ride Out, where she has designed a custom skate deck to be raffled off at the Babes East Coast event. In our latest Q&A, Jenna talks about how Vichcraft came about, gives us insights into running a business, and shares with us what she’s most excited about for this year’s 2017 Babes Ride Out! 

Photographs courtesy of the artist.

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Poverty fucking sucks but it sucks a hell of a lot more if you’re born with a vagina.

what really confuses me is the claim that radfems are all these privileged white middle class women, like, poverty was one of the main factors in me developing my ideology.  
Witnessing the poverty inflicted on the women in my family as they raise children while the entitled men just fuck off and abandon their children to make heaps of money and have the nerve to say they deserve it all fair and square because they’ve made “responsible choices”. I’m sorry but abandoning your children is the epitome of irresponsibility.
Facing the choice between homelessness or staying with a violent partner.  I mean abusive men suck no matter what but it’s pretty rough when leaving means you have to also drop out of university and lose almost everything you own because you have no savings, no transport and nowhere to go.
Watching friend after friend get pregnant and fall into the same trap where their baby daddy is abusive or completely irresponsible and childlike or just fucks off leaving them to a life of poverty and hardship while raising children because boys didn’t want to wear a condom but also don’t want to take responsibility for a child and abortions were hard as fuck to access in my home town.  And they act like the biggest victims because a girl wants him to occasionally change a nappy or refrain from coming home at 3am making heaps of noise and mess, or buy the kid something needed instead of decking out their shitty car with mods, or hell, just occasionally see the kid who misses their daddy and doesn’t understand why he isn’t around any more.  I see these heartbroken girls grow into heartbroken women just accepting their lot in life and the cycle just never ends.

Not to mention the stigma teenage mothers face because they had the AUDACITY to be sexually active in a pornsick culture where they are pressured to have sex at a young age and bombarded with media telling them that they need a relationship with a dude to be happy and often have little external social supports and inadequate education and sometimes unstable housing and grew up far too fast so they ended up in a “serious relationship” at 14 because it resembled stability and gave them comfort (not to mention the significant portion who are just outright targeted by predatory older guys because they’re vulnerable…seriously I knew an 11 year old girl in the foster care system who’s 18 year old cousin raped her and she had a baby at 12 and this kind of thing just normal where I come from…another friend of mine was 14 when her 19 year old boyfriend convinced her it would be a great idea to have a baby, so they had a baby, and then because her boyfriend was a violent sociopath, her family wouldn’t let her live with them so she was homeless for a few years while the baby lived with her family, where the original 14 year old friend grew up getting molested by strange men coming in and out of the house constantly because that’s what life’s like when your parents are drug addicts, but anyway…).  Now, the boys also are experiencing poverty and lacking education and social support, but they aren’t pushing strollers around the mall so they aren’t a “drain on taxpayer money”…
Not to mention the politicians who hate poor people also happen to hate women and brown people I mean WHAT an incredible coincidence…

This went a little off topic but, the biology of women and ability to bare children is so, so linked to poverty and class and this is something frequently explored in radical feminist discussion.  Growing up in a culture of poverty has shaped me profoundly and I just find it really insulting when people say that radical feminism is somehow a middle class ideology because it’s pretty obvious to anyone who’s poor that whether or not someone can have babies (ie biological sex) is a factor that MAJORLY affects someone’s life and chances of escaping poverty.  This is not something you can identify into or out of!  

Poverty fucking sucks but it sucks a hell of a lot more if you’re born with a vagina.

anonymous asked:

Do you think, if they survive the second apocalypse and the end of the show, that Clarke and Bellamy could ever have a family? How do you see each of them handling parenthood?

This has been sitting in my inbox forever, mostly because parenting and to have/to not have kids is a topic that risks alienating people and it is so difficult to talk about without someone feeling like you’re shitting on their choices and I have not had the brainpower recently to navigate it. However, @wellamyblake‘s awesomely morose headcanon on this subject (I loved it. I cried. I loved it some more and then yearned for fluff) has inspired me to put digit to keyboard at last.

This may border on fluff. You have been warned, but WE ALL NEED HAPPINESS RIGHT.

Disclaimers out the way first, because this stuff is important.  Women in all walks of life face so much pressure to have kids and it annoys me immensely that happy story endings for ladies almost always involve children somehow, even if a female protagonist has repeatedly said she doesn’t want to procreate (I’m looking at you Suzanne Collins). THAT SAID, it also annoys me immensely that parenting is repeatedly shat on as a lesser (i.e. feminine) choice more generally, as in bringing up other humans could not possibly compare to the Very Important Man Jobs that also make the world go round, and I wish that parenting and its associated joys and terrors were tackled more frequently in the media more generally.

You see the minefield we’re dealing with here.  (Sidebar: my feminism is undoubtedly not what you were after with this ask but I offer no apologies for delving into it.  THIS STUFF MATTERS.)

So what follows is just my read of Bellamy and Clarke and my own personal headcanon – no more valid than anyone else’s – and is inevitably coloured by my own experience as a parent.

OK, so the question at hand. Could I see Bellarke family? The short answer is YES PLZ, because my beautiful space babies have been through so much and I would dearly, dearly love for them to have a shot at family life after everything they’ve been through, and to reap the rewards thereof. Not actually in-show, mind you (JASON NO), but this is what my headcanon looks like.

I’m going to reference MJ throughout because her headcanon was so beautifully put together and I super agree with lots of it. Bellarke’s legacy will absolutely be cemented in the lives they’ve saved over and over again and I don’t think Bellarke kids would be relevant to their legacy per se. So too, Bellarke’s legacy will exist in the found family they have amongst the delinquents.

But honestly, I think that having a family would be something selfish, just for them and just about them as a couple, and that’s what I like about it so much after all the sacrifices they’ve made for their people.

Let’s rewind for a second. Why would Bellamy and Clarke even want kids?  Well so much of it for me is bound up in their respective childhoods. Bellamy’s family life was clearly very important to him.  He loves his sister. He loved his mother very much too. It is this love from which he derived so much of his strength in impossible conditions in the Ark, and later on the ground. In fact, Bellamy is basically made of familial love – the love for his actual family, his love for his found family, and his love for the various waifs and strays he picks up on the way (Charlotte and, *cough* Riley).  How awesome would it be for him to have a family on his own terms?  A family which he chose to have (rather than foisted upon him), with the woman he loves? The thought of it warms my tired, grizzled heart to a veritable furnace.

Need I mention this:

Originally posted by stiles-lydia

Clarke’s situation is slightly more complex, as biologically she would bear the initial brunt of parenthood, and let’s face it, Clarke is a person with Shit To Do. But in my headcanon, Clarke is tired of saving the world, ready to try something different even if it’s just for a little while, and take on a challenge of a different nature. And my girl NEVER shies away from a challenge if it’s something she wants. I get the impression that Clarke’s childhood was relatively happy, and I think Clarke, like many people, would like to recreate that childhood happiness for someone else with someone she loves.

Also this

Originally posted by alexmaggie

And just, drawing from my own experience, having a family together is about building a life together, and while achieving that through kids is not the right thing for everybody, I think Bellamy and Clarke’s depleted family connections and unique situation would drive them to create something new in their own image.

Now, MJ made the absolutely valid point that Bellamy and Clarke wouldn’t feel worthy of passing on their legacy via the gene pool, having had  hand in circa 1,600 deaths between them. This is 100% fair, but one thing about being a parent is this: you want better for your children than you had for yourself.  You want your children to be BETTER THAN YOU. You want to pass on the wisdom gained from the mistakes you’ve made so that they don’t make them.  And Bellamy and Clarke, who have made so many mistakes and had the courage to face them all, would have more than a little invested in passing on their wisdom to a second generation of Skaikru.

As for how they’d handle it. Well parenthood is and always has been about sacrifice, but (where it is a choice) it is also a selfish thing too – about bringing life into the world partly for your own benefit. And who knows more about sacrifice, or deserves more selfish pleasure than Bellarke? What’s more it has always struck me that Bellamy and Clarke are both naturally very affectionate people.  They enjoy lavishing love and affection on people and receiving in return. Again, own family, own terms.

And most importantly, Bellamy and Clarke have each other. They are a team. Bellamy may struggle with letting his impulses get the better of him, or expressing himself; Clarke may struggle with relating to those she loves, but between them they’ll muddle through because they always have and they always will.

(Before embarking on yet another sacrificial journey though, both Bellamy and Clarke deserve a long, long rest of several years, just them, spending lots of time together lounging in long grass, swimming in lakes and screwing in caves. Just have a look at the fanfic, OK? It’s all there.)

I warned you about the fluff. Now I’m embarrassed and I’m going to shove my face in a cushion until you all go away and stop looking at me.

anonymous asked:

Hi. Sorry my English really bad. I see your thread on twitter about poc. Can me (white girl) say 'SH has much POC' so i not have to say 'sh have one chinese man, one half mexico half lebanese woman, etc.' Or is it mean to say? Please educate me!!! Thank in advance.

Okay, I’m going to clarify the proper use of the term people/person of color (POC).

Where does POC come from?
It’s important to note that the term of color came from people-first language so it would not be quite right to say POC women or POC actors. It’s not the worst if you do this but it’s still awkward in the “ATM machine” sense. You should instead say women of color or actors of color.

When can you use the term POC?
POC is a great term to quickly encompass all non-white people, especially when referring to instances where they appear as a group like your example with a diverse cast containing many different races and ethnicities. Using it in that case is 100% fine. 

When should you not use POC?
When referring to individuals or to media that speaks directly to a specific race, it’s important not to throw it under the umbrella of POC. Magnus is an Asian* bisexual; Moonlight is about a gay black man. These characters and stories speak specifically to certain groups, so designating it as overall “POC” media erases the individual race/ethnicity for whom the characters/stories speak to.

*Truthfully, even “Asian” is a bit of a large umbrella because Asians are a huge diverse group within themselves. Issues that affect East Asians do not always overlap with those that affect South East Asians do not always overlap with those that affect South Asians. For example, my sister, a SE Asian who is very light, does not have same difficulties moving through airport security as her husband does, who is South Asian.

Why is it not okay?
This erasure is significant because for several reasons:

1. It leads people to assume that POC can be interchangeable. And when people feel that one “POC” can stand in to represent “diversity” for all POC, it results in them thinking they’ve done enough to cast one or two brown people and call it a day. So when I talk about how I don’t have a lot of rep, I get given a long list of non-white characters as if to say, “You have these, why are you still complaining? Isn’t it enough?”

First of all, even with the entire list of POC it isn’t enough to make up for the number of white characters that have dominated media for decades and second of all, once you reduce that already small list to their individual races/ethnicities, there’s even less.

2. It results in people not understanding the specific stereotypes that apply to certain races/ethnicities. For example, Magnus is especially susceptible to desexualization and feminization as an Asian man so things that are okay to talk about with him (i.e. being very…large) would not be okay to do with a character who is a black man, as black men are frequently hypersexualized.

Why do POC sometimes use the term POC instead of their race then?
These questions spawned after Harry did, in fact, use the term person of color and I want to clarify that a person of color using that particular term to stand in solidarity with other people of color is completely different than white people using it to lump us all together. For those of us who aren’t white, I think it was clear to us what he was doing – underlining the importance of any LGBT+ POC being recognized over white LGBT+ – which is a nuance I guess gets lost when you are outside the community.

So yes, some of us under specific circumstances will choose to use the identifier POC rather than our specific race for purposes of solidarity. However, as I said in that thread, white people cannot stand in solidarity with us. They can only stand beside us as allies. So it carries completely different connotations when used by them. It only serves to throw all POC under the same umbrella.

Anyway, I hope this helps clear things up; I realize it can be complex and especially on social media platforms where people like to type shorthand, it’s easy to just throw it in wherever. And frankly, some of us are guilty of this, too. But basically, just remember that while diversity of all kinds is important to all people of color, each race/ethnicity has unique issues to overcome and unique experiences they identify with. So the continued use of POC as an umbrella perpetuates the idea that one “POC rep” is enough for all of us and meant to be shared among us, which is a concept that really needs to end if we are to further push diversity in media.

Meta Monday: Martha and the Doctor

Welcome to the second half of my reply to the ridiculous comment I got on one of my fanfics. The first half of the comment was a rant against Rose. You can read my Rose Tyler Defence here.

Now we’re onto a topic that’s bothered me from the day I joined the Doctor Who fandom: people blaming the Doctor for not returning Martha’s feelings. 

Before I get started, please understand I am not saying the Doctor treated Martha perfectly. He definitely messed up, more than once. Have you ever realised the first six episodes of S3 cover less than a week? He was so frantic to not have a moment of down time that I’m not sure he really let Martha rest at all. He selfishly ignored her needs.

However… Well, let’s go back to the review and pick apart the points about the Doctor and Martha. Again, if it’s in quotation marks, it’s directly from the review.

1) “Also the Doctor made Martha feel second best to Rose.”

No, he didn’t. One time he made a comment that “Rose would know.” One time he said something that could be construed as comparing her to Rose and finding her lacking. (And I’d argue that he didn’t even realise that’s how it sounded–the line is about wishing Rose were there, not about how Martha isn’t as good as Rose.)

Oh, and one time he took her someplace he’d taken Rose. 

Martha compared herself to Rose in a contest for the Doctor’s affections. It was a contest she was always doomed to lose–something he told her upfront the day she stepped onto the TARDIS.

MARTHA: All on your own? 

DOCTOR: Well, sometimes I have guests. I mean some friends, travelling alongside. I had. There was recently, a friend of mine. Rose, her name was. Rose. And we were together. Anyway. 

MARTHA: Where is she now? 

DOCTOR: With her family. Happy. She’s fine. She’s. Not that you’re replacing her. 

(Emphasis mine)

And if you think Martha didn’t understand that the Doctor meant she wouldn’t replace Rose romantically, two lines later she’s teasing him about the genetic transfer.

So the Doctor told her from the start that they would never be together romantically, and Martha chose to believe she could change his mind. My guess is that she interpreted the situation as a break-up and figured he just needed time to get over Rose. But that misunderstanding is not the Doctor’s fault.

2)  “He also did nothing when he took her as a full time companion to protect her the 2 times she was picked up by racist people.”

Okay. Here’s one of the tricky things about S3. I really side-eye the situations the writers chose to put Martha in. I understand “Human Nature” was based on a novel that was set in 1914. But the writers did little to make that an easier situation for their black companion. 

I don’t blame the Doctor for that, because the Doctor wasn’t actually there. He was in the watch. The Doctor also didn’t choose the time or place they ended up–the TARDIS did that. 

I’m not sure what the other situation is. “Blink?” We see almost nothing of the Doctor and Martha’s time in 1969, so I don’t know how anyone could state with certainty that the Doctor did nothing to help her. Also, I’ll point out that once again, he had no choice in the time they were stuck there. 

Martha didn’t work in a shop because it was the only job she could get as a black woman. She worked in a shop because it was the only job she could get without a CV or references. She did seem to resent the Doctor for that, but her resentment does not actually make it his fault. 

3) “It’s understandable that Rose was his first companion after war, but that did not mean that he had to treat Martha not only as if she was second best and not even tell her that she did a good job.”

Oh boy. 

POINT 1: The Doctor was not attached to Rose just because she was his first companion after the War. He fell in love with her, and because of that, he grieved when he lost her. 

POINT 2: Absolutely none of the things the Doctor did wrong with Martha are Rose’s fault. (Remember, this is all in context of a long review about how Rose was just a selfish girl and Martha was So Much Better.) Rose wasn’t even there in S3 to influence the Doctor’s behaviour. His neglect of Martha is all on him. It is not further proof that Rose was selfish.

POINT 3: He does, in fact, tell Martha she did a good job.

“Very good point. Brilliant, in fact. What was your name?” (Smith and Jones)

 “Oh. Oh, Martha Jones, I like you.” (Shakespeare Code)

“Oh, Martha Jones, you’re a star.” (Lazarus Experiment)

“Thank you.” (42)

“Thanks for looking after me.” (Family of Blood) 

“Thank you. Martha Jones, you saved the world.” (Last of the Time Lords)

Martha had a difficult go of it. She got in the TARDIS with a man grieving for his lost love, and she didn’t realise the full truth of that until nearly the end of her travels. (The fic this comment was left on, In the Shadow of a Ghost, covers the moment she realised.)

Her unrequited feelings suck for her, and I really resent the writers for making almost every major character moment about the fact that the Doctor didn’t love her back. Martha is so much more than the girl who pined for the Doctor. She is clever and badass and a caring friend. I wish they would have focused on those things more. 

I do understand enough about intersectional feminism to get that a black woman playing the love interest is actually a breakthrough. Women of colour are not often shown as objects of romance in media. They have to be the Strong Female Friend instead. But. Martha was not written as the love interest. For her to be the romantic partner, her feelings would have to be returned by the lead character, and they were not. 

To sum up, the fact is that none of Martha’s struggles that stemmed directly from her feelings for the Doctor were his fault. I suppose that when he realised that against his warning she had developed feelings for him, he could have sat her down and talked to her. I suppose. But given that he did warn her off from the start, I don’t know how it can be said that he did not do enough in that regard. 

I realise that in “Partners in Crime,” the Doctor says it was his fault that things got complicated. But feeling guilty for things that are not his fault is one of the Doctor’s chief mental pathologies. In fact, you could probably use his willingness to accept blame for things he had no control over as a gauge of his overall mental health. 

Martha herself doesn’t blame the Doctor for her feelings or for not returning them. In her speech before leaving, she doesn’t say, “You made me feel second best.” She says she spent a lot of time thinking she was second best. She takes ownership of that thought. And after explaining the parallel situation with her friend, she doesn’t accuse him of never seeing her like that. She doesn’t say it like he did anything wrong. She just says that she needs to get out.

That realisation that she’s gotten herself into a bad emotional situation and she needs to get herself out is Martha’s shining moment. It’s Martha realising she’s not second best to Rose, that the Doctor not loving her like he loves Rose does not mean she holds less value. Knowing that she’ll lose sight of that if she stays and so, choosing to leave, is the wisest, bravest thing she’s ever done. Blaming the whole thing on the Doctor steals the power of that moment. It isn’t about him; it’s about her.

you know what i’ll never understand about tumblr? these people literally follow hate trends. thats it. 

they never do any research into anything that they prefer to just be informed by from the media. and y’all out here preaching feminism 24/7 yet hating on every white woman (sure some may deserve it but for some its unnecessary and its only because you’ve stereotyped them all) like i ain’t even white but my coloured ass can see how hypocritical tumblr can be (and i feel like its mostly americans - not all obviously, but just a very loud minority). Honestly y’all need to stop acting like you’re so damn perfect and have never made any mistakes, bc if any of you were celebs, you’d be getting slaughtered by people like yourselves, sometimes for no damn reason.

Like do y’all ever realise that the reason celebs like Adele and Ed Sheeran are so chill is because us Brits don’t use any given opportunity to drag them into everything that goes wrong with our country - sure they could raise awareness but at the end of the day it’s not gonna help. like when the results came in that we were leaving the EU it was literally so miserable for all of our generation who this will impact, but guess what, we weren’t sitting there searching or people to blame because we haven’t conditioned ourselves to hate anyone that isn’t like us. y’all are just as bad as you think others are.

some people on here honestly need to just log out and find a better hobby because this just seems to be making them miserable