it happens to best of us sometimes

anonymous asked:

Something to remember is that really no matter how likable you make someone, it is their actions that determine whether they're a hero or a villain. I see a lot of writers professional or amateur fall into the trap of thinking charisma solves everything.

Uh, not sure what this refers to? Morgan, maybe?

I’m fully aware of this and in fact do my best to use it to my advantage, hence the distinction I frequently make between antagonist and villain. Using Morgan as an example, she’s a villain because she does nasty things for mostly selfish reasons, but she’s not an antagonist, because she happens to be close with and on the same side as the protagonist.

I like villains. Pretty much all my favorite characters, both my own and otherwise, are the bad guys. I recognize they’re villains, and they don’t need to be sympathetic for me to love them, though it sometimes helps. In the same vein, a “good” character doing bad things or simply doing things for the wrong reasons doesn’t necessarily preclude me from liking them.

Morality is complex and I personally prefer that everything is shades of gray as much as possible. Among my own characters and my favorite characters, you’d find very little in the way of stark good and evil, regardless of charisma.

ok so there’s a game me and my friends play called “don’t get me started” and basically someone gives another person a random topic and they have to go on an angry rant about it and it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to us at parties and car rides so I highly recommend playing sometimes with your friends

Once you graduate high school, you see who your real friends are. People change. Someone who you thought was your best friend will cut you off completely. Some of us enter high school with plenty of friends and end with only a few close ones. Others of us enter high school with only a few close friends and end with no friends at all. It’s just how life is. It’s like that sometimes. It sucks but it happens to almost everyone.
—  real friends // excerpt from a book I’ll never write #14
Happy Tuesday.

I’m calling it “Yurio Catches Puberty” as a working title. (PG for swearing and puberty.) (Warning for body image stuff, very minor.) 

***

“WHEN WILL THIS BE OVER?”

The scream of anguish from the rink’s locker room shower made Yuuri look up sharply. He’d only arrived in St. Petersburg yesterday, but this couldn’t be normal, even if nobody else seemed to be paying the slightest attention.

“AUGH!”

It was definitely Yurio.

“Yurio?” he started to ask, but Georgi clapped a hand over his mouth.

“Don’t engage,” he hissed.

Yuuri looked at him, wide-eyed.

“What’s going on?” he whispered, as Yurio began a steady, at least quieter stream of cursing in Russian, then English, then Japanese that Yuuri definitely hadn’t taught him.

“Puberty,” Georgi said.

Yuuri blinked. “Puberty?” he asked.

Georgi gave him a disgusted look. “Of course,” he mumbled to himself. “The golden boy didn’t suffer puberty…”

He wandered off, now also cursing, and Yuuri had ten seconds of silence before Yurio kicked the shower door open and strode out, towel around his waist.

(There is a readmore below! Read more!)

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Tips for driving while autistic

I feel like a lot of autistic people have a lot of trouble driving and getting their license. For many people that’s okay, there’s nothing wrong with that, y'all are valid in every possible way. Unfortunately, many of us live in cities where public transportation might as well not exist, in food deserts, in situations where we do not have people who can drive us places, in cities which make bike riding life-threatening and sometimes illegal. I would like to reiterate: there is absolutely nothing wrong with not being able to drive. The fucked up thing is a system which forces people to drive. This is intended to be suggestions for autistic people in similar situations to mine: in a food desert, no public transit, not enough money to pay for uber, etc.

Tips for driving while autistic and things to be prepared for:

-if you start dissociating and don’t feel that you can drive safely, pull over if you can. If there’s no clear place to pull over, get as far to the side as possible and turn your hazards on (this is the button with two red triangles, one inside of the other)

-keep plenty of water in the car. Keep food in the car too, but to prevent mice and rats from being tempted to investigate, keep the food in tightly sealed containers.

-if you miss the turn, it’s ok. I promise, it’s ok. Just take the next turn. Usually you’ll still be able to get to your destination by taking the next turn, and if not, it’ll give you a chance to pull over and re-evaluate or turn around.

-people will use some body language to indicate what they are intending to do. A waving hand means, “you go ahead of me.” A still hand, palm out means, “I’ll go first/thank you.”

-if you’re driving down a street too narrow for two cars, and you meet a car going in the opposite direction, just pull over for a second. Or if it’s super narrow, someone may have to back out of the street. It’s not a big deal. Try to be nice in those situations and they usually will be too. For that matter, sometimes I have to swerve slightly into the lane of incoming traffic because of bicycles and that happens too. People around you will do their best to compensate, but try to make sure you’re giving them enough time and warning for them to compensate (use your turn signal or hazards and spend as little time in the wrong lane as possible).

-no one wants to crash. Usually if you do something stupid the people around you will compensate and avoid you, although you might get some honks and middle fingers (yeah, mentally prepare for that)

-in terms of speed limit, it’s usually better to match the cars around you. The actual speed on a road is usually about 5mph over the posted speed limit.

-it doesn’t matter if you are going 15mph over the speed limit. There are still assholes who will tailgate you. (Meaning they will drive really close behind your car attempting to intimidate you into driving faster) The key thing to remember is that they also don’t want to crash, which means all they will do is intimidate. Because I’m an asshole and I hate tailgaters, I usually slow down when someone starts tailgating me. Remember: do not start driving faster. Police will ticket the person in front (aka you) because that person is “setting the speed” and they will not ticket the tailgater.

-parking is stressful, especially in downtown areas. Be prepared to wander for a while looking for parking and factor that into your drive time.

-some places no longer require you to learn to parallel park. Please learn anyway if you feel able. It will make finding parking a lot easier later on.

-bicycles will always be where you least expect them. Always. Especially if it’s illegal for them to be there. Just be prepared for them being anywhere and everywhere and not following the laws of traffic at all.

-the first time it rains or snows in the fall/winter, literally everyone will have forgotten how to drive. It’s a thing. Be prepared for the roads to be chaotic

-the most difficult part is the test itself. That’s the part where you disregard everything I’ve said about how driving actually works and just obey the letter of the law the best you can. Don’t forget you can retake the test if need be. Also, there will often be reviews online talking about which DMV in your area has the easiest test route.

-I try to do meditation breathing a lot while I’m driving under stressful circumstances. It’s very helpful for me

I hope this is helpful. If anyone else has any other tips for driving while autistic, I would be glad to hear them.

Edit: I can’t believe I forgot this! I’ve found that certain types of stimming can be somewhat dangerous while driving. I’d say chewing stims are fine, vocal stims are cool, but I would hold off on the visual and physical motion stims until you’ve had quite a bit of driving practice. Auditory stims are somewhat ok, but be careful to make sure you can still hear sirens and stuff (also earbuds/headphones while driving are illegal in many places)

-turn signals can basically function as a way of telling people around you “hey, pay attention! I’m about to do something!” Even if you’re just changing lanes or are swerving around an open car door you can use them to communicate that people should be ready for you to do something unexpected.

-traffic will stop much more quickly than you expect. Always keep an eye on the brake lights ahead of you.

So things don’t work out.
That happens sometimes.

Sometimes that’s for the best.

—  “Take us for instance, we’re better off as
friends, but we’ll never really just be friends
and I think that’s fine for now as long as
we can be healthy to and for each other”
remnant-thoughts
Lessons I have learned from hosting children’s craft parties

You may remember me from such iconic rants as ‘we get to be the aliens this time’ and ‘the glue famine of 2017.’ What you may not be aware of is that our store does classes and birthday parties. I used to get roped into doing them. Now it’s part of my job description and I… have to do them. So here are some things I have learned.

  • Children do not understand self-control. You cannot stop them from dumping an entire tube of paint onto the canvas. You cannot stop them from using their hands. You cannot stop them from using their face. You cannot stop them. You cannot stop them. 
  • A key difference between children and adults is that children are generally prepared for the answer ‘no.’ Adults are prepared for the answer ‘no’ as well, but they know that the response to ‘no’ is ‘I’d like to speak to your manager.’ 
  • Nothing in this world can prevent a group of children from marching around the room, chanting ‘avacado mustache, avacado mustache.’ 
  • At some point during the class, some of the kids will start counting down from 50. The rest of the class will join in. They never reach zero. No one knows what happens at zero. We’re afraid to find out. 
  • Children are known to bark when a stranger approaches. 
  • They will ask questions. As with the fair folk, it is in your best interest to answer them honestly and with heavily coded language- lest they use it against you. When questions cannot be answered, your best course of action is an offering of food or something shiny. 
  • A gathering of children of any number exceeding 8 will eventually devolve into chaos. Embrace it or be defeated by it. 
  • Sometimes 8 means 12. Sometimes 12 means 18. Sometimes 18 means 23. Sometimes 8 means 23. 
  • A great way to get children to listen to you is to shout ‘if you can hear me, clap once!’ They clap once, it gets their attention. Then softer. ‘if you can hear me, clap twice.’ They clap. You have their attention. Savor these moments. Use them wisely. Always know what you are going to say before you use this power. Their attentions are fragile. 
  • Speak to them like humans. No, not those humans. Humans you like. 

I’ll probably remember more later when my brain isn’t fried. 

15 things I wish I’d known before starting my studyblr:

1. 

You have no idea what you’re getting yourself into.

2.

You didn’t know there was such a thing as branded stationery, but heck, there’s a thriving market out there. 

3.

LOOK AT ALL THE APPS. THE ADVICE. The resources! Be wary: sometimes simple is best.

4. 

People are going to share their dreams, fears,  doubts, hopes, ambitions and “oh my fuck what the fuck is happening moments” with you. You’re going to learn so much from people you’ve never met; who live half a world away. You’ll learn that exam stress is universal, as are feelings of inadequacy and loneliness and anxiousness. A whole new world will open up to you, one message at a time.

5. 

People will take your photos, re upload them, use them without credit. They’re going to delete your captions. It’ll piss you off. Its downright disrespectful. You’ll want to leave. Platitudes like ‘the internet is a free space’ will not dull the swell of anger. But don’t let a few fools ruin a good thing. Remember all the messages of support, the funny tags on the reblogs, the kindness oh god the kindness.

6. 

Stand up for yourself. Whether it be your study methods, your study philosophy or your style. Be firm, but respectful.

7. 

Sometimes you’ll wake up to messages which will make you cry. You’ve never wanted to move mountains before, you never thought you could have such a visceral reaction to someone else’s problems  - but in that moment you’ll want to cross international borders and give someone a hug. Oceans be damned. 

8. 

You’re no hero. You can’t help everyone, and your advice may be useful to some and useless to others. That’s ok. Find your own support network within this huge ass community and make it a positive experience for yourself.

9. 

Tumblr’s text formatting is a nightmare.

10. 

Be vulnerable. Writing about your personal experiences will be cathartic. Giving advice will be cathartic. In guiding others you will be guiding yourself. In doing so, you’ll need to be brutally honest about your own failures, your own doubts and misgivings. You will feel vulnerable, a twisted form of quid pro quo you’re not sure you love. Share your stories of success, your stories of failure so that others will step forward and share theirs. Cheer at other’s success; lend a shoulder to cry on when they don’t. Reach out and start a dialogue. 

11. 

Taking a photo will not dull the pain, or tears. You will still have bad days.

12. 

People won’t believe that you use natural lighting. They evidently haven’t spent Summer in Australia before.

13. 

The number of notes or reblogs your posts have does not reflect the impact that they have on a person’s life. Who the fuck cares about reblogs when you’re sitting in the exam hall the next morning. 

14. 

There’s going to be a pointless debate about 'aesthetic’ vs 'effective studying’ which will make you groan and smack your forehead against the closest wall. And then you’re going to remember livejournal. And then you’re going to feel old.

15. 

You’re going to meet people who are kind, lovely, whose opinions differ from yours - and that’s ok. There are going to be people you’ll be able to have long 3am conversations with, whose music library you’ll want to freaking raid, and others whose tags will always brighten your day. There’s going to be people who consistently pop up on your activity feed, shadowing your every move and you’re not sure how to express your appreciation but trust me, they’ll know.


+ You started this project in a midnight ramble not expecting anything out of it. You’re going to be in for one hell of a ride. There is no reason to be afraid.

With love,

fuckstudy.

Masterpost: Autism and Vocabulary

As a writer, we’re sure you are aware that words are important. You can’t always substitute one for another because they all have their own depth of meaning and their own subtleties. So if you want to write an autistic character, you’ll have to refer to autism using the right words. This post will help you do just that!

Autistic person? Person who has autism? Which one should I use?

This is a highly debated question. You might have heard “You have to say “person with autism” because you’re talking about a person first; the person is not defined by their disability!”. While this is a nice thought, it is largely misguided, and this way of talking are mainly used by non-autistic persons while talking about us. The autistic community doesn’t like this “person-first” language very much for several reasons.

First of all, if you need to use specific language to remind yourself that we are people, you may have a problem that no amount of linguistic workarounds can solve. We say “a French person”, not “a person who is French” or “a person with Frenchness”, because we don’t need to remind ourselves that French people are people. Why should it be different with autistic people?

The second reason most of us don’t like saying we are “persons with autism” is that our autism is not something that we carry with us. We are not a human person + a terrible disorder. We are fundamentally different. Being autistic is an integral part of who we are as people, and touches every sphere of our lives. If someone somehow managed to take away our autism, they wouldn’t reveal the “real us” that was hidden behind it: they would create a whole different person. We can’t be separated from our autism, and this should be reflected in the language you use while talking about us.

So ideally, you’ll want to use “autistic”, as an adjective: Cat is autistic, they are an autistic person. Some of us sometimes use “autistic” as a noun as a shortcut, when we’re tired of repeating “people” all the time, but it’s best to avoid it when you can, especially if you’re allistic.

What you really need to avoid is “a person with autism”, or heaven forbid “a person who happens to have autism”, “a person who suffers from autism”, “a person who lives with autism”, or any variation thereof. I’ve also seen a few people write “an autist”, but I don’t get why they do that. Please don’t do it.

And please don’t refer to us as being “on the spectrum,” we don’t need a euphemism to soften the blow of the word “autistic.” We are autistic! Even those who don’t seem disabled. Please remember that, while it is all too often misused in an insulting or pejorative way, “autistic” is not a bad word. Don’t be afraid to use it! In fact, using it more and in a positive way is the best way to stop it from being misused as a pejorative.

You keep using these words I don’t understand…

Alright, let’s get a glossary going! We’ll update this post whenever we use a word that could be hard to understand (if we can remember to do it…). If there is any word on the blog that you can’t understand, check if we’ve explained it here. If we haven’t, shoot us an ask and we’ll do it ASAP. :)
All of the titles are clickable and will take you to the corresponding tag so you can check out everything we’ve written about a subject.

AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Encompasses all means of communicating used by nonverbal people which are not spoken/sign language, such as using a text-to-speech device or a pictogram system to communicate.

ABA: Applied Behaviour Analysis, the most common type of “therapy” autistic children are subjected to. It can have lots of negative long-terms effects on the person’s life, such as PTSD or vulnerability to abuse.

Ableism: Treating disabled people (including autistic people) poorly because they are disabled.Treating someone differently because they behave in autistic ways, punishing autistic people for stimming, forcing nonverbal autistics to communicate verbally (and ignoring other types of communication), etc. are all examples of ableist behavior.

Alexithymia: Difficulty identifying one’s own emotions, very common in autistic people. They may not know how they feel at all, or simply unable to name their feelings. They are often unable to answer the question “How are you?” or “How are you feeling?” and may be aware only of whether they are feeling “good” or “bad” (and sometimes not even that).

Allistic: Someone who is not autistic. Used as an adjective and sometimes as a noun.

Asperger’s Syndrome: An outdated diagnostic term for an autistic person who is generally able to communicate verbally at a typical age and shows interest in social relationships. This is no longer considered to be a thing which exists. (See our masterpost on functioning labels.)

Autistic: Someone who is autistic (ie the subject of this whole blog) (I don’t know why we added that to the glossary)

Cure Culture / Curism: The attitude held by many allistic groups (most notably the hate group “Autism Speaks”) that autism is a disorder or disease which should be eliminated from the human race and place a priority on “curing” it. This is similar to the old belief that homosexuality is a disease that should be cured, and just as harmful to autistic people.

Disability: There are two main definitions to this word: 1- Not being able to do something that the majority of people are able to do. For example: hear (deaf), see (blind), smell (anosmic), walk (para/quadriplegic), etc.  2-Being impaired by a physical/mental difference in a way that restricts one’s professional, social, personal, or leisure activities. Depending on the definition and personal opinions, autistic people can be considered disabled or not disabled.

Dyspraxia: Difficulty with gross and/or fine motor skills, very common in autistic people. To a casual observer they may appear clumsy, often dropping things, walking into things, or tripping over their own feet (gross motor skills), or with poor handwriting, poor ability to hold a writing instrument, etc. (fine motor skills).

Echolalia: Use of verbal repetition to communicate, usually used by those who are not fully verbal. Words and phrases can be immediately repeated directly (“You OK?” “You OK.”), or with some changes (“Are you OK?” “I am okay.”). They can also come from memory (“Who gave you that?” [Darth Vader voice] “I am your father.” = my father).

Executive Dysfunction: Difficulty with executive functioning; skills used to make decisions and carry out tasks. Many autistic people have problems with this. They may be unable to make what appear to be simple decisions or figure out how to accomplish a simple goal. They may know exactly what they need to do but be unable to get their body to move to do it. It has been described via metaphors in a few ways: one is having all the ingredients to make a cake but no recipe, and being expected to make the cake, but having no idea how to do it. Another is that the body is like a horse and the brain is the rider, and the rider tries to get the horse to move, but it simply won’t budge.

Functioning Labels: Outdated and inaccurate (but sadly, still commonly used) labels for autistic people based on a narrow set of criteria. Those who don’t communicate verbally are normally considered “low-functioning”, for example, and those who can are “high-functioning”. See our masterpost for more information on why these labels are damaging and should not be used.

Hyperacusis: When a person is extremely sensitive to sound and the world sounds far louder to them than to others. It is often extremely painful, like having the volume on the world turned up way too high, and can be disabling. Many people with hyperacusis have or develop tinnitus (a constant sound, often ringing, usually caused by nerve damage in the ears).

Hyperempathy: Having far more affective empathy than a normal person. This can result in things like crying often, being unable to comfort upset people because their emotions are too overwhelming, etc. Some people feel hyperempathy all the time. Some have it only sometimes or for some people, or for inanimate objects.

Hypersensitivity: A blanket term which means “being more sensitive than most people to something”. When it comes to autism, it can refer to several things. Most of the time, it is used about sensory hypersensitivity, such as sensitivity to sounds or bright lights. There is also emotional hypersensitivity (easily getting hurt feelings/responding very strongly to positive feelings).

Hyposensitivity: The opposite of hypersensitivity, some autistic people feel a lack of sensory stimulation. They feel understimulated and may constantly feel the need to seek sensory stimulation. It’s important to note than an autistic person may be hypersensitive in some ways and hyposensitive in others, or at different times.

Infodumping: Sharing a large amount of information on a single topic all at once, often without pausing or allowing others to speak, due to overwhelming enthusiasm for the subject. It is usually done on subjects of special interest.

Low empathy: Some autistic people feel reduced or no affective empathy for other people (do not identify with their emotions or feel inspired to a certain emotion when they see others having that emotion). This does not necessarily mean that they do not care about the emotions of others - some may not care, some may care a great deal - only that they do not feel what others feel. Some people with low empathy for other people have hyperempathy for inanimate objects or fictional characters.

Meltdown: When the brain is too overloaded with sensory information or stress and can no longer function properly, an autistic individual may have a very violent reaction, called a meltdown. The person melting down is generally in a lot of pain. They might scream, throw things, yell curse words and insults, cry, hurt themselves or other, and try to hide themselves in absurd locations like under couch cushions or behind doors.
This neurological event cannot be controlled or stopped once it begins. It can be made worse by interfering and adding more sensory input (by touching or talking to the person) and usually will not subside until the person is left alone to calm down. 

Neurodivergent/Neuroatypical: Having a neurology which is different from the most common ones, such as being autistic or having ADHD. Some people include mental illnesses in this label, some do not.

Neurodiversity: The philosophy that in order to succeed, survive, and thrive, the human race needs many different types of neurology, and that neurodiverse people are an important and positive component of our species.

Neurotypical: A term which is defined as “having the most common type of neurology” (ie not autistic, without ADHD/dyslexia/tourette’s, etc.). Someone with a mental illness may or may not be considered neurotypical depending on people’s opinions.

Nonverbal: Someone who cannot or does not communicate verbally (using spoken language, often including sign language). Some autistic people are always nonverbal. Most are nonverbal under stress or overload. Some are always verbal.

Passing: Successfully behaving enough like an allistic person, particularly in social situations, that no one suspects you are autistic. Often important or even necessary for some people, especially when it comes to work situations.

PECS: One of the AAC methods which is most commonly used with autistic children (and sometimes adults). Stands for “Picture Exchange Communication System”. A pictogram-based system.

Proprioception: All of the sensory input which comes from inside your body. Includes your brain’s awareness of where the different parts of your body are. Autistic people often have very poor proprioception. As a result, they may have some type of dyspraxia, odd facial expressions, odd posture and walking gait, etc., all of which they may not be aware of until someone tells/shows them.

Sensory Processing Disorder: The clinical term for someone who has difficulty processing sensory information. Includes sensory hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity and differences. Too many details to process can lead to sensory overload, shutdowns, and meltdowns. Some autistic people don’t agree that it is a disorder, and prefer to talk of “sensory processing differences”.

Sensory Overload: When too much sensory information is being sent to the brain and the brain can no longer keep up. It becomes painful and the person can become incapable of accepting new sensory information until the brain has time to catch up (like a computer freezing when too many programs are open). This often leads to shutdowns and/or meltdowns.

Shutdown: A defense mechanism against sensory overload and stress. The brain attempts to shut out all sensory input by disconnecting from the environment. The person might no longer understand speech (or even fully hear it), be able to think in language (or to think in any way at all), move their body, or communicate in any way. Their eyes might unfocus and they may seem to be completely “out of it”. This state is usually a sign that the person needs to be left alone for their brain to calm down, but if pushed by those around them, they may switch to having a meltdown.

Special Interest: A subject which an autistic person is extremely interested in and will go to great lengths to learn everything possible about.

Spoons: A metaphor used to indicate the (limited) amount of energy a disabled or sick person has to devote to various tasks. There is a whole script blog devoted to this (@scriptspoonies). Many autistic people rely on this metaphor to describe their (lack of) energy.

Stimming: Repeated actions which are used to stimulate one’s own nervous system, done for various reasons including to soothe oneself/calm down, express emotions, communicate, or just because it feels nice. Common examples include rocking back and forth, flapping hands, clenching jaw, tapping a part of the body, making a repeated noise, etc.

Verbal: Able to communicate using spoken language.

Discernment Pro Tips

from someone who has been doing it for a hot minute.

With divination in general, whether from yourself or others:

  • If everything you keep using to discern with keeps pointing to no, it’s probably a no.
  • Conversely, if everything keeps pointing to a yes, it’s probably a yes.
  • 99 no’s and one yes doesn’t make a yes.
  • If your answers keep coming back hazy or wishy-washy, there is probably a reason and you should figure that reason out before moving forward.
  • There is nothing wrong with giving a spread to a more experienced diviner and asking for their input on the meaning of the cards.
  • When you ask someone else for input, actually listen to them.
  • Remember that being wrong is not a sin or inherently bad. We’re all wrong sometimes.

Within divination you do yourself:

  • Be aware of confirmation bias. We all have it, and its hard to cut through. Cut through it as best as you can.
  • To counteract the fact that memories can shift and change, it’s better to write down what you think happened before you start to delve into divination or discernment. That way, you won’t inadvertently influence memories or shift things.
  • Use multiple formats of discernment or divination if possible.
  • When in doubt, give it more time. Time is one of the easiest ways to prove if something is legit or not.

With outside divination:

  • If you’re going to get a divination done from an outside source, someone with a proven track record is best.
  • Similarly, getting multiple readings from ppl with proven records is best.
  • You can get a reading from someone without a proven record, but make sure you don’t place all of your weight into that reading.
  • Don’t place all of your weight into any reading. That saying about eggs and baskets is relevant. 
  • Blind readings are always a better bet.
  • Key word: blind. This includes how you phrase your query.
  • “I need to know why my god suddenly hates me” is not a good “blind” query. “I would like to know more about the status of my relationship with my god” or “I would like more insight as to the recent shift in my relationship with my god” is better.
  • Keep in mind that if you’ve placed all of your recent “woo” in a public source, someone can use that to infer information about your situation.
  • If your diviner needs to ask a lot of probing questions before they give you answers, walk away.
  • If your diviner gives you answers, and you tell them that it’s not accurate, which causes them to start bringing out “new information” that diverges from previous answers and wasn’t present before the extra details, walk away.
  • Be careful what information you give after the fact as well. It’s very easy to infer a lot of things simply based off of basic statements. The less information you give, the easier it will be to write the reading off as being accurate and unbiased.

this has been a thing.

VIGILANTE  SENTENCE  STARTERS. 

these are some vigilante starters in the pov of city street people, categorized in the forms of negative, positive and neutral.

NEGATIVE.

❝ This is a job for the police, not a mutant monster. ❞
❝ Why doesn’t she/he let the police handle it! ❞
❝ He/she/they is always getting in the way of police work! ❞
❝ I don’t think we feel protected with a monster on the loose! ❞
❝ That’s no hero. That’s someone looking for attention. ❞
❝ That is no hero! She/he needs to be behind the bars! ❞
❝ This superhero person just gets away with all these crimes! ❞
❝ I don’t like the idea of someone flying about the city. ❞
❝ Why haven’t they captured this person yet? ❞
❝ I think this ’ hero ’ ought to turn themselves in! ❞
❝ You aren’t no hero. You are just another criminal. ❞
❝ Who gave them the right to law into their own hands? ❞
❝ Why is the ’ hero ’ so privileged? ❞
❝ I’ve had enough of this city’s crazy vigilante! ❞
❝ I want justice to be brought and served to this masked person! ❞
❝ I can’t believe people actually think this is a hero. ❞
❝ Oh, so, we can take justice and law into our own hands now? ❞
❝ This ’ hero ’ is a bad influence on our children. ❞
❝ I don’t want my children looking up to some criminal! ❞
❝ This hero has proved that this city is going to fall to anarchy. ❞
❝ Whoever they are, they just need to go back to wherever they came from. ❞ 

POSITIVE.

❝ I think they’re doing some good for our city. ❞
❝ No offense, but, they’re doing a lot more than the police ever did. ❞
❝ Yeah and that superhero has saved my life countless times! ❞
❝ They’re not a criminal, the police like working with them. ❞
❝ I’ll have you know the police would be lost without them. ❞
❝ Hey, I kind of like this new superhero guy/girl. ❞
❝ Our city needs this kind of hero, have you seen the criminals lately? ❞
❝ I think what you’re doing here, superhero, is good. ❞
❝ You only ever see the bad in anything, never the good. ❞
❝ What do you likes o much about this vigilante anyways? ❞
❝ They have saved a lot more lives than anyone else could of saved. ❞
❝ So what? The police have an extra hand with things? It’s good!  ❞
❝ I used to never read the paper, until our superhero came along. ❞
❝ I watch the news everyday just to the masked hero. ❞
❝ You know, they saved my life once. Just remember that. ❞
❝ What’s so bad about breaking minor crimes to stop someone? ❞
❝ I’m not saying they aren’t at fault sometimes but they are good. ❞
❝ This ’ hero ’ is the best thing to ever happen to this city! ❞
❝ I’m kind of a fan of the hero flying about our city. ❞
❝ I feel much safer walker the streets with our new hero at large. ❞
❝ The day this city’s hero leaves, is the day I leave. ❞

NEUTRAL

❝ Anyways, have you seen/heard about our new profound hero? ❞
❝ Why does he/she/they have to be all dressed up for anyway? ❞
❝ I really like the suit they fly around in. It’s nice. ❞
❝ So, is that tights your wearing or what is that? ❞
❝ I just wanted to say, I’ve always wanted you to save my life. ❞
❝ What’s this suit made of? Did you make this yourself? ❞
❝ Hey, just throwing it out, if you ever need a sidekick one day.. ❞
❝ Do me a favor and never save my life ever again! ❞
❝ Don’t you have a life to be saving somewhere? ❞
❝ What is that? What was that? Wait.. is that? A person? ❞
❝ My city has a flying superhero or something, you’ll get used to that. ❞ 
❝ You totally have a crush on that superhero person. ❞
❝ This is kind of like a movie or something, isn’t it? ❞
❝ Why is that superhero person hellbent on hiding their  identity? ❞
❝ Maybe that superhero kills people at night, like serial killer. ❞
❝ Whenever I grow up, I want to be just her/him/they. ❞
❝ Wait, wait.. I just wanted to ask.. could I have your autograph? ❞
❝ How do you ever get used to living with a flying person in the city? ❞
❝ Have you seen the news lately? That superhero is all over it. ❞
❝ I want to follow the superhero, see where they go, find out who they are. ❞
❝ Let’s go on a mission to discover who this masked helper is, yeah? ❞

I don’t miss you as much anymore. Sometimes you cross my mind but not like you use to. I remember when I thought that I couldn’t live without you and looking back on it, you were the best and worst thing that happened to me. Its been hard, its been so hard to get over you but looking back on it time passes, and the more you live your life and create new habits, you get used to not having a text message every morning saying, ‘Hello, beautiful. Good morning.’ You get used to not calling someone at night to tell him how your day was. You replace these old habits with new habits. As time goes on, you get better, but only with time. You still see them and a spark is there, your mind still races when you see them, its going to, you use to love that person with every inch of your soul, with every emotion you could possibly have. Its just not the same anymore.
— 

@livingpreppywearingpearls

Kaitlyne Smith

Effortless

Summary: In which losing someone shouldn’t be so effortless, but your friend does it without thinking twice. 

Pairing: Bucky x Reader

Word Count: 1,290

A/N: Title inspired by Over My Head by the Fray. This is for anyone who had a friend abandon them for no reason (that you’re aware of) and who felt the sting of that loss.

@avengerstories - you’re honestly the queen of editing and I’d be lost without you.

Originally posted by jlstreck

Your silence is something Bucky is unfamiliar with. For as long as he’s known you, you’ve always had something to say. When he first arrived at the tower and refused to say a word, you were there to talk enough for the both of you. He didn’t tell you then, but it was the thing that comforted him most during those early days.

Your silence is something Bucky doesn’t know what to do with. It comes out of the blue and makes him question what’s wrong. Or more correctly, what he did wrong. You still let him hug you whenever he wants and kiss you until the both of you are gasping for air, yet he still can’t help but wonder.

Your silence makes Bucky nervous because what could have possibly happened to turn you into a shadow of the person you once were?

Keep reading

The plight of tertiary functions

SUBMITTED by Steve

ESxJs (Tertiary Ne): “We love routine, but we are not slaves to it. We love when someone proposes something fun and exciting. We’re always on the lookout for new interests. We have a cooky, creative side to us. We have no problems shaking up things and trying to do what has worked before differently. We sometimes question whether our lives are stuck in a rut. Be careful because our sense of humor may sometimes shock or offend you.”

IxFJs (Tertiary Ti): “We are humanists at heart, but only to some extent. We’re also capable of detaching ourselves from situations and people, leaving our emotions aside and dissecting what’s really going here. We’re not blind caretakers, we can call people on their bullshit. We also have an interest for some things mechanical/scientific in nature that might surprise you.”

ENxJs (Tertiary Se): “We’re not as uptight as we seem. We love to let loose and have fun. Actually, we often delight in spoiling ourselves and giving in to our immediate desires. Designer clothes, nice cars, that’s the stuff that life is made of. We actually do abide by the philosophy that you only live once. We are visionaries, but also realists. A dream ultimately needs to be realistic.”

IxTJs (Teriary Fi): “We are not robots. Sure, most of the time, we look at things from a more business perspective, but we will speak out when an issue that is precious to us is trampled on. We value hard work ethics, but we also look down harshly on laziness, corruption or anyone taking short cuts in life. Integrity is of utmost importance to us and we will not allow it to be put into question. We know what we believe in, we know we are our own person. Take a minute to get to know us outside the workplace, and you’ll be surprised what a unique soul we can be.”

ExTPs (Tertiary Fe): “We may come off as insensitive assholes sometimes and even look like we delight in it, but the truth is, we care very much how you feel. Our charm is not superficial, it’s the first step into establishing a genuine connection. Whatever we argue for or against, we actually do want you by our side, in our cause. We’re rough around the edges sometimes, but do know that our apologies are usually heartfelt. We’ll give the shirts of our backs if someone we care about needs it.”

ISxPs (Tertiary Ni): “It often looks like we do things just for the hell of it. But in actuality, there is usually a deeper goal behind it. We do contemplate on the bigger picture, on the more important matters at hand. We don’t always take everything at face value, recklessly. We like to determine what is our bigger purpose in life. Don’t mock our projects and hobbies, they are usually well thought out and speak to who we are.”

ExFPs (Tertiary Te): “We may look lazy and carefree sometimes, but when we decide to buckle up and make things happen, you best get out of our way. We like to use sarcasm to mask our true feelings on matters, but we can call a spade, a spade. You’d be surprised how competent we are at projects and taking the leadership role. We are much more down-to-earth and realistic than you give us credit for. If you criticize something or someone we like, we will come up with logical arguments as to why you’re wrong.”

INxPs (Teriary Si): “while it may seem like our minds our wandering all over the place, we do know what’s important to us. We hold on strongly to what we like, what has mattered to us through our personal experience. We love to bring up references, we have a mean streak of sentimentality. Even though it looks like we’re always challenging the status quo, some things should never go out of style. We always look like we’re moving on to the next thing, but we’ll always leave a trail of breadcrumbs of where we’ve been and what we’ve seen. Not every new interpretations of things is always the good, often, the original is the best and can’t be outdone.”

One of the most bizarre lines I see antis use is that if fans depict the characters being mad at each other, a ship must be bad. I’ve seen antis argue that if shippers depict two characters bickering a lot, it’s got to be unhealthy. If that’s true, then my two closest friends, both of whom I’ve known for 15 years now, are in an abusive friendship with me, because we bicker and snark like it’s our second language. And believe me, as someone who has been abused and has known abusive people, there is no comparison.

Like…kids. Listen. Fights and getting mad happens in all kinds of close relationships, even healthy ones, and it’s not always the ~quirky misunderstandings~ you see in sitcoms or manga. Disagreement happens. Getting annoyed happens. Getting pissed off happens. No, it’s not healthy to fight a lot, but arguments do happen, even to the best of us. This is especially true if both people are particularly strong-willed - and a lot of people love ships that have two very strong-willed personalities.

An old art teacher of mine once told me that his first screaming match with his wife as a married man was over the colour of a damn coffee cup. She thought it was blue. He thought it was green. They’ve been happily married for 30+ years now. They laugh about it now and tease each other about the cup occasionally. That’s okay, too. Sometimes even the worst arguments are truly ridiculous and you look back on them and laugh or find it endearing. Sometimes, the arguments are serious, but you can still look back on them and smile because you learned more about the other person and your relationship became deeper. 

There’s a serious misunderstanding of what abuse or abusive people look like on this site, and it seems especially rampant in anti circles, who take fairly simple ship tropes and conclude that they’re abusive. It really goes to show just how little they know about the variety and complexity of human relationships. If you look in a ship tag and see character A annoying character B, or both characters glaring or yelling at each other, that doesn’t mean the shippers are romanticising abuse - it means they’re exploring a natural part of any relationship which, when it occurs in that particular ship, happens to interest them. 

If you’ve been abused, it can be incredibly easy to see something negative or rough in a ship and have an immediate gut reaction to it because it reminds you of unhealthy behaviour. I still reflexively flinch if someone raises their voice with me. But it’s important to remember that not every raised voice is an abusive voice; more often than not, it’s just a raised voice, and that’s okay. Similarly, shippers depicting arguments doesn’t mean abuse is being glorified. 

tl;dr, stop reaching

A Smile

It costs nothing, but means so much.

Originally posted by jacksepticeyegifs

It enriches those who receive it, without impoverishing those that give it.

Originally posted by fansofmarkimoo

It happens in a flash, but sometimes the memory lasts forever.

Originally posted by pewdiecringe

None are so rich that they can get on without it, and none are so poor, but are right for its benefits.

Originally posted by martziplier98

It is rest for the weary, daylight to the discouraged.

Originally posted by crankityler

Sunshine to the sad, and nature’s best antidote in times of trouble.

Originally posted by aj-squidkid

Yet it cannot be bought, borrowed, or stolen, for it is something that no earthly use to anyone unless given away.

Originally posted by wiishugifs

And if in the rush of business a man is too tired to give you one, then leave one of yours.

Originally posted by theanomex

For no one needs a smile so much as those who have none to give.

Originally posted by martziplier98

Inspiration Post: Workout

Not every problem you have to solve as a superhero can be “worked out” in your workshop.

Superheros need to be fit! And a lot of time is spent on getting yourself in the right shape and keeping up to form.

Workouts can be good to clear your mind…

but they are even better when you can impress a certain someone at the same time!

It’s a given that from time to time you need to be ready for a fight! And one of the perks of being an Avengers is that you can have hand-to-hand combat lessons from your favorite person…. 

… and that can be the perfect time to spend more time together and see those muscles work and get sweaty.

It’s a good idea to have your training equipment on hand - so you won’t get into trouble!

 The best thing though is the shower after.

Or sometimes what happens after.

And even superheroes know that if you do it right, everywhere is good place for a workout and a little cardio training. You can get some training in even if you never leave your room.

 So remember: There are all kinds of ways to workout! 

 If you have questions, send us an ask or email at cap.im.events@gmail.com. Art can be submitted to the @capim-tinybang tumblr or to our email.

Full information on the event can be found here. The art submission deadline is June 27!