israeli-palestinian-conflict

Something To Live For

Human psychology continues to be basically what I’d predict - while still being startling at the same time. Specifically, getting people to settle down in families is a shockingly good way to make them stop being dangerously antisocial:

It was the most elite unit we [ie: The Palestinian Liberation Organisation] had. The members were suicidal – not in the sense of religious terrorists who surrender their lives to ascend to heaven but in the sense that we could send them anywhere to do anything and they were prepared to lay down their lives to do it. No question. No hesitation. They were absolutely dedicated and absolutely ruthless.

“My host, who was one of Abu Iyad’s most trusted deputies, was charged with devising a solution. For months both men thought of various ways to solve the Black September problem, discussing and debating what they could possibly do, short of killing all these young men, to stop them from committing further acts of terror.

Finally they hit upon an idea. Why not simply marry them off? In other words, why not find a way to give these men – the most dedicated, competent, and implacable fighters in the entire PLO - a reason to live rather than to die? Having failed to come up with any viable alternatives, the two men put their plan in motion.“

“So approximately a hundred of these beautiful young women were brought to Beirut. There, in a sort of PLO version of a college mixer, boy met girl, boy fell in love with girl, boy would, it was hoped, marry girl. There was an additional incentive, designed to facilitate not just amorous connections but long-lasting relationships. The hundred or so Black Septemberists were told that if they married these women, they would be paid $3,000; given an apartment in Beirut with a gas stove, a refrigerator, and a television; and employed by the PLO in some nonviolent capacity. Any of these couples that had a baby within a year would be rewarded with an additional $5,000.

Both Abu Iyad and the future general worried that their scheme would never work. But, as the general recounted, without exception the Black Septemberists fell in love, got married, settled down, and in most cases started a family…the general explained, not one of them would agree to travel abroad, for fear of being arrested and losing all that they had – that is, being deprived of their wives and children. And so, my host told me, that is how we shut down Black September and eliminated terrorism. It is the only successful case that I know of.”

I’m a crazy romantic and even I didn’t expect that tying guys like these down with wives and kids would have such a radical civilising effect. I wonder if this has any implications for gangs or other violent pests?

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If you can understand how Muslims have been racialized through the way North Americans see race but you refuse to admit that Jews are an ethnoreligious group and not just a religion that people of different racial backgrounds adhere to, your problem isn’t just that you don’t understand how to perform a basic google search, but that you have internalized western anti-Semitism, and your social justice is bullshit.

If you erase the historical and ethnic roots of a marginalized group to fit your wild prejudices about them and think that it’s okay because instead of using their name, you use other names that only hint at them (Jew vs Zionist, Zio, Rothschild, etc.) you are an anti-Semite and your social justice is bullshit.

anonymous asked:

What is the solution to the Israeli Palestinian conflict?

From the mouth of one wiser than I:

“I GOT VERY UPSET,” said Uriel. “THAMIEL TRICKED ME INTO GETTING ANGRY, AND I FELL FOR IT. I USED THE ENERGY I WAS SUPPOSED TO USE TO SUSTAIN THE UNIVERSE TO MAKE EVERYONE GO AWAY. THEN I FELT VERY BAD AND I USED MORE OF IT TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM WITH ISRAEL SO PEOPLE WOULDN’T HATE ME.”

“Solve the problem with Israel?”

“I PEELED APART SPACE SO THAT TWO ISRAELS EXIST IN THE SAME SPOT. ONE OF THEM CONTAINS ONLY JEWS, THE OTHER CONTAINS ONLY PALESTINIANS. ANY JEWISH PERSON WHO ENTERS THE COUNTRY WILL FIND THEMSELVES IN THE JEWISH ONE. ANY MUSLIM PERSON WHO ENTERS THE COUNTRY WILL FIND THEMSELVES IN THE PALESTINIAN ONE. ANY CHRISTIAN OR ATHEIST OR SO ON WILL FIND THEMSELVES IN A SUPERPOSITION OF BOTH STATES. IT WILL PROBABLY BE VERY CONFUSING.”

Unsong, chapter 36

Our photo of the day: 

A Palestinian woman and her son are seen at the entrance of their impoverished house Feb. 15 in Beit Hanun, in the northern Gaza Strip. Their house is near the ruins of a building that was destroyed during the 50-day war between Israel and Hamas militants nearly three years ago, in the summer of 2014.

Photo by Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images

BTW I’m rethinking my two state stance, due to both actually being here now and having spoken with multiple people on the subject whilst here.
We spoke with a very right wing, settler, Bennett supporting lady, and right after we spoke with a very leftwing Christian Palestinian man who grew up going to Israeli Zionist schools, and the morning prior we spoke with a man who wasn’t really on the left/right divide, and was a secular Israeli Jew.

This has been pretty intense, to say the least, but one point was consistent: one way or another, a two state solution isn’t practical and just doesn’t have the population supporting it, and if it was forcibly implemented it would likely only worsen the conflict and hatred.

The Palestinian man suggested something like the “Swiss system”, where the Jews would have control of Jewish areas, Palestinians/Arabs would control their areas, possibly other larger sections could get separate control over their areas, and a larger government would connect these groups through joint control over military, food, water, roads, electricity, etc.

In his words, he said both Israeli and Palestinian populations due to their histories have developed a severe victim complex and thus both are reacting to a threat that they are creating BY reacting in the first place, in a two way fashion. Think if it like a causation loop, but it’s two circles stuck together.

I actually like this idea a lot, because it gives each group local autonomy and room for intra-politics, and then it gives another layer for national politics between the groups. It doesn’t stamp out Palestinian national aspirations, it doesn’t push the Israelis into the sea, it doesn’t murder this group or that group, and even opens the door for other groups to get a stronger voice, if they want it. The goal of this idea is to remove the stigma and slowly reduce the hatred, without there being a loser. Jews can still have law of return and Jewish culture protected, Palestinians can build up their infrastructure and resources without worry, the land itself stops getting blown up, the people are not stuck in constant anxiety with rockets overhead, and the Old City is jointly protected.


I think this is a more nuanced version of the “binational one state solution”, that rather that inspiring competing nationalisms and reactionary IntraPolitik, would instead foster brotherhood and autonomous respect.

To sum him up, he said “this land is a holy land to all of us, religiously and culturally. Dividing it, that wouldn’t help. It’s like the baby brought before king Solomon, cutting it in half would only kill the land and no one who really cares about the land would want that, only those who hate would want such a thing. The people of this land, regardless of ethnicity, have dealt with terrible governments and deadly conditions, and there is now a larger culture of hatred. The thing about hatred is that it is drinking poison and expecting the other to die from it. No, what actually happens is the reactionary hatred and religious fanaticism will swallow the people’s culture and destroy it from within. Look no further than Hamas or militant Charedim as my evidence. When all the focus, all the spending, and all the conversations are focused on hatred, revenge, separatism, and murder, then who is feeding the people, planting the trees, building the communities, or educating the children? Who is helping the poor, the needy? Who is watching and checking the culture? No one. With that route, there is no future, not because it isn’t possible to implement, but because it means death. I do not mean hold hands, sing, and everything will be fine, no, there is still negotiations to be had, repercussions and justice, apologies and learning, but it is this other path that can redeem the people.”

He also spoke briefly about BDS, in a manner that I adored. It was yo the effect of “the minority that is seeking change and has a nuanced conversation going, they are exploring, good for them. The majority, however, is antisemitic, actually exasperate the issues and fanaticism, and are not working with the Palestinians best interests in mind, rather they are imposing their British, American, Canadian etc ideological niche on a nuanced middle eastern context that they cannot relate to. I don’t believe in boycotts, they stop conversation, they stop thought, and they put walls where we should make bridges.”

So yeah. He was a very powerful speaker. I find this idea preserves Zionist goals, Palestinian liberation and justice, the will of the average person regardless of affiliation, and would (hopefully) satisfy the international community. This conflict is a true test of humanities maturity, I think. If this can be sorted out, then the rest of our issues can be also. If not, we are doomed to eternal wars and suffering for profit.

anonymous asked:

I really am not trying to pick a fight, I just want to let you know that for many people it is hard not to be anti-israel even if they aren't anti-semitist. israel has caused nothing but pain for my family, and I am not even allowed in israel myself and there is no right of return. i do agree that those white people marching down streets for palestinian rights is just irritating as fuck though because they literally have no say on this conflict?? 1/2

but just so you know for the future, even being allowed to enter israel is a privilege, and i’m sure it’s a beautiful country–i wish i could go there. and also, i would hate anybody who took over palestine, know matter what the religion. even if it were a muslim group as well. 2/2

-

As I said in the post I believe your referencing, it is not possible to be against a Jewish state and not be antisemitic. Not a thing. You can criticize Israel but if you say it has no right to exist you’re antisemitic. And again, JEWS WERE THERE FIRST. It’s our homeland. If you want to start criticizing someone, maybe take a swing at Hamas and the Palestinian state, because they are killing far more civilians than Israel ever has or will. I’m not sure where you’re from that you can’t enter Israel, but yes it is beautiful and it’s also a democracy. There are several Arabs on the Israeli cabinet currently–not just Jews are represented. You said you didn’t want to pick a fight but if you actually read my posts you obviously do by saying stuff that suggests Israel is an apartheid state. It’s not.

PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES. West Bank. Kfar Qaddum. January 8, 2016. A Palestinian protester walks past burning tyres during clashes with Israeli security forces following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel.

Photograph: Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP

So this is legit the message Trump left at the Holocaust memorial in Israel -

- and, yeah.

One Republican official, who requested anonymity in order to speak freely, said after meeting Trump recently he did not think the president had a firm enough grasp on the nuances of the long-running Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

“I don’t think he understands it,” said the official, adding that Trump needed more detailed briefings before leaving on Friday. “I think it’s a very difficult challenge and I hope he’s going to talk to a lot of smart people.”

Conversations with some officials who have briefed Trump and others who are aware of how he absorbs information portray a president with a short attention span.

He likes single-page memos and visual aids like maps, charts, graphs and photos.

National Security Council officials have strategically included Trump’s name in ‘as many paragraphs as we can because he keeps reading if he’s mentioned,’ according to one source, who relayed conversations he had with NSC officials.

[source: Reuters]

“Wow. That is absolutely pathetic. Our President can only understand the world to the extent it involves…himself.”

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Historical Bibliography: Ottoman Empire

Intro/Methodology
Bronze Age Collapse-Roman Period
Byzantine Empire and the Rise of Islam and Caliphate Rule

Crusades, Medieval European Jewish History, and Sephardic Jewish History

Ottoman Empire

Ottoman Brothers: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Early Twentieth-Century Palestine by Michelle Campos

Becoming Ottomans: Sephardi Jews and Imperial Citizenship in the Modern Era by Julia Phillips Cohen

Osman’s Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire by Caroline Finkel

A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire by M. Sükrü Hanioglu

The Arabs of the Ottoman Empire, 1516-1918: A Social and Cultural History by Bruce Masters

The Ottomans and the Mamluks: Imperial Diplomacy and Warfare in the Islamic World (Library of Ottoman Studies) by Cihan Yüksel Muslu

The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922 (New Approaches to European History) by Donald Quataert

Frontiers of the State in the Late Ottoman Empire: Transjordan, 1850-1921 (Cambridge Middle East Studies) by Eugene L. Rogan

Palestine in Transformation, 1856-1882: Studies in Social, Economic and Political Development by Alexander Scholch

The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World (Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization) by Baki Tezcan

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