islamic state of iraq & syria (isis)

I haven’t been posting much but someone asked about that “ha ha go around the whole the US base thing” and it’s about this ^^^

Recently the Syrian Arab Army cut through the Syrian desert to rejoin borders with the Iraqi government for the first time since war broke out and the islamic state carved out most of the border region between the two states, physically erasing the border between the two states.

In the south, a couple years ago, American funded and supported(literally, American soldiers) rebels crossed into islamic state desert north of Jordan (a us ally and opponent of syria) with top of the line Jordanian and American vehicles/munitions to establish a “”“free syrian army”“” toehold in the Syrian desert to try and reclaim eastern syria when the Syrian government began reestablishing control in the east by retaking palmyra. The hopes were for the rebels to take islamic state held eastern syria before the Syrian Arab Army could, in order for assad to be further isolated.

However, the SAA proverbially cucked them as they had with Turkish backed syrian rebels in the north by racing around the bumblefucking multi million dollar US tax payer worth southern rebels and cut them off in the same shitty pocket of shitty desert they originally managed to take from ISIS during their original blitzkrieg.

Now, the SAA can expand north-east in lockstep with their Iraqi allies in their fight against the Islamic State while western puppets can not.

Hiiiiiiilarious

An Open Letter from British Fighters Against the Islamic State:

“We are some of an increasing number of British nationals fighting in Syria and Iraq as volunteers with local forces against the Islamic State.

We wish first and foremost to express our sorrow and anger at the recent terrorist attack in Westminster, London, and to convey our sincerest and most heartfelt condolences to the victims and their families. We know only too well what is to lose friends, to treat those horrendously wounded, to pull the dead and dying from the rubble.

We also wish to express sympathy and solidarity with the many ordinary Muslims going to work and school today feeling that they are under special scrutiny, and fearful of what this might mean for them. We share their fear, and we urge anyone who might be tempted to take against ordinary Muslim people to think again. If you associate them with the Islamic State, you are giving such groups exactly what they want: a greater and more violent gap between the Muslim world and ours.

The familiar sounds of hate and bigotry are sounding again – on social media, and in the more guarded mainstream press - where the intent is nonetheless clear. Hate crimes will spike again. There are calls to demolish mosques. The fact that local Muslims raised thousands for victim support, in the immediate aftermath of the attack, is easily drowned out by the bandwagon. The EDL have called a snap demonstration, eager to make hay from the suffering of innocent people.

For all the sound and fury, we don’t remember seeing anyone from Britain First, EDL, UKIP, or their like, by our side in battle. Which is a good thing, because we wouldn’t have tolerated them.

Our ranks are made up of Kurds, Arabs, Yezidis, Brits, Yanks, Canadians, Aussies, Asians, Europeans - Muslims, Christians, Alevis, atheists - too many faiths and races to list. A multi-ethnic, multi-faith entity, standing united against hate and extremism.

The majority are, in fact, Muslims, and not only are we proud to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with them - the truth is, we can’t do this without them.

The only way to defeat the Islamic State, and groups like it, is with ordinary, moderate Muslims on side. The only way to defeat hate and extremism is to not give in to it.

Don’t stand with Britain First, the EDL, UKIP or those who talk and think like them. Stand with us.”

Signed, British fighters of the YPG:

Joe Akerman

Aiden Aslin

Mark Ayres

Botan England

Michael Enright

Macer Gifford

John Harding

Jac Holmes

Steve Kerr

Jim Matthews

Tom Mawdsley

Ozkan Ozdil

Shaun Pinner

Joe Robinson

Josh Walker.

The World According to Trump

The starkest difference between dictatorships and democracies is that democracies are ruled by laws, and dictatorships are ruled by dictators.

The “rule of law,” as it’s often referred to, stands for laws that emerge from a process responsive to the majority, that are consistently applied, and are applicable to everyone regardless of their position or power.

Donald Trump doesn’t seem to understand this. Within a matter of days, Trump has bombed Syria and a group of fighters in eastern Afghanistan.

On April 12, Trump authorized the Pentagon to drop a 22,000-pound GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB) on people described as “Islamic State forces” in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistani border.

It’s the first time this bomb – nicknamed the “mother of all bombs,” and the largest air-dropped munition in the U.S. military’s inventory – has ever been used in a combat.

It’s the largest explosive device America has utilized since dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II. (By comparison, U.S. aircraft commonly drop bombs that weigh between 250 to 2,000 pounds.)

Why, exactly? It’s not clear. And what was Trump’s authority to do this? Even less clear.

We still don’t know exactly why Trump bombed Syria. He said it was because Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, used chemical weapons on innocent civilians, including children.

But it wasn’t the first time Assad had used chemical weapons. When he did in 2013, Trump counseled against bombing Syria in response.

And where did Trump get the authority to bomb Syria? Assad is a vicious dictator who does terrible things to his people. But U.S. law doesn’t authorize presidents to go to war against vicious dictators who do terrible things to their people.

The Constitution leaves it up to Congress, not the president, to declare war.

In 2014, President Barack Obama began hostilities against the Islamic State, arguing that Congress’s approval of George W. Bush’s wars against Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2002 provided him sufficient to authority.

Well, maybe. But there’s no way Trump can rely on Congress’s approval of these wars to bomb Syria.

And it’s a stretch to argue that a group claiming or alleged to be connected to ISIS, but located in eastern Afghanistan far away from where ISIS is attempting to establish an Islamic State, is the same as the Islamic State.

In a democracy, the rule of law means that we the people are supposed to be in charge, through our elected representatives in Congress.

It can be a heavy responsibility. It is especially weighty when it comes to warfare, to the destruction and annihilation of human beings.

As Commander-in-Chief, a president is empowered to manage the military might of the nation. But he is not empowered to initiate warfare on his own. That’s our job. 

The world according to Trump is becoming increasingly dangerous, in part because we are not doing our job. 

5

#RESIST protesters crash Trump’s speech to construction unions and more: April 4 in photos

Protesters hold up signs as President Donald Trump speaks at the 2017 North America’s Building Trades Unions National Legislative Conference in Washington; a man carries a child following a suspected chemical attack, at a makeshift hospital in the town of Khan Sheikhoun, northern Idlib province, Syria; fans arrive during a practice round for the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga.; An Iraqi Federal Police member fires an RPG towards Islamic State militants during a battle in Mosul, Iraq; and, South Sudanese refugee children gather with their  belongings after crossing into Uganda at the Ngomoromo border post in Lamwo district, northern Uganda.

These are just a few of the photos of the day for April 4, 2017.

(Photos: Susan Walsh/AP, Edlib Media Center, via AP, Matt Slocum/AP, Khalid al Mousily/Reuters, Reuters)

See more photos of the day on Yahoo News.

In pictures: South Korea's Sewol ferry emerges from the sea nearly three years after it sank

The wreckage of a 6,800-ton South Korean ferry has emerged from the sea nearly three years after it capsized and sank, killing 304 people – most of them children on a school trip. The Sewol passenger ferry sank off the coast of Jindo island on 16 April 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about public safety and regulatory failures.

Salvage workers started to bring up the vessel, which had been lying on its side at a depth of 44 metres (144 feet), late on Wednesday (22 April), rolling up 66 cables connected to a frame of metal beams divers had spent months putting beneath the ferry. At around 4am, the blue-and-white right side of ferry, rusty, scratched and coated in mud and sediment, emerged for the first time in more than 1,000 days.

Trending: London terror attack live: Eight arrests as more victims named

By about 7am the ferry had been raised enough for workers to climb on it and further fasten it to the barges. Once Sewol is raised to the desired point, salvage crews will then load the ferry onto a semi-submersible, heavy-lift vessel that will carry it to a mainland port. The loading process, including emptying the ferry of water and fuel, is expected to take days.

Don’t miss: Ex-EDL leader condemned for ‘Islam is at war’ rant at Westminster attack scene

Most popular: London terror attack: Theresa May states 'we are not afraid’ after killings

The bodies of 295 passengers were recovered after the vessel sank, but nine are still missing. Relatives, some of whom who are watching from two fishing boats just outside the operation area, are hoping that those remains will be found inside the ferry.

You may be interested in:

6

IRAN. Tehran. June 7, 2017. Gunmen and suicide bombers attacked Iran’s parliament and the shrine of its revolutionary leader, killing at least 12 people, wounding dozens and igniting an hours-long siege at the legislature that ended with four attackers dead.

The Islamic State group claimed the attacks, marking the first time the Sunni extremists have taken responsibility for an assault in Shiite-majority Iran. The militants are at war with Iranian-backed forces in Syria and Iraq, and view Shiites as apostates.

The attacks began mid-morning when assailants armed with Kalashnikov rifles stormed the parliament building. One of the attackers later blew himself up inside, where a session had been in progress, according to a statement carried by Iran’s state TV.

Deputy Interior Minister Mohammad Hossein Zolfaghari told Iran’s state TV the apparently male attackers wore women’s attire. The semi-official Tasnim news agency later reported the siege had ended with four of the attackers killed.

Mizan Online, an Iranian state-run news website, said 12 people were killed and 42 wounded in the two attacks. It quoted Pirhossein Kolivand, the head of Iran’s emergency department. (AP)

Photographs: Omid Vahabzadeh/TIMA via Reuters/Fars News Agency/AP

9

IRAN. Tehran. June 7, 2017. Gunmen and suicide bombers attacked Iran’s parliament and the shrine of its revolutionary leader on Wednesday, killing at least 12 people, wounding dozens and igniting an hours-long siege at the legislature that ended with four attackers dead.

The Islamic State group claimed the attacks, marking the first time the Sunni extremists have taken responsibility for an assault in Shiite-majority Iran. The militants are at war with Iranian-backed forces in Syria and Iraq, and view Shiites as apostates.

The attacks began mid morning when assailants armed with Kalashnikov rifles stormed the parliament building. One of the attackers later blew himself up inside, where a session had been in progress, according to a statement carried by Iran’s state TV.

Deputy Interior Minister Mohammad Hossein Zolfaghari told Iran’s state TV the apparently male attackers wore women’s attire. The semi-official Tasnim news agency later reported the siege had ended with four of the attackers killed.

Mizan Online, an Iranian state-run news website, said 12 people were killed and 42 wounded in the two attacks. It quoted Pirhossein Kolivand, the head of Iran’s emergency department. (AP)

Photographs: Tasnim News Agency/Handout via Reuters

One tragedy doesn’t need to diminish another. You can stand with Paris, you can stand with Yemen, you can stand with Lebanon, you can stand with Syria, you can stand with Iraq, you can stand with Nigeria, you can stand with Libya, you can stand with BlackLivesMatter, you can stand with the University of Missouri, you can stand with Palestine, you can stand with South Korea, and the South Sudan, we can stand with refugees, we can stand with Muslims, and you can stand with all of them at the same time. You can care about all of them. We don’t need to play “oh you didn’t mention this, or this was worse” competitions with human suffering. It’s sickening, this is not a fucking game, this is the actual loss of human life.

independent.co.uk
"I am a 14-year-old Yazidi girl given as a gift to an Isis commander. Here’s how I escaped"

“That afternoon, they brought us to an empty school in Baaj, a little town west of Mosul near the Syrian border. We met many other Yazidi women who were captured by Islamic State. Their fathers, brothers and husbands had also been killed, they told us. Then Islamic State fighters entered. One of them recited the words to the shahada, the Muslim creed – “I testify that there is no God but Allah, and that Muhammad is his prophet” – and said that if we repeated them, we would become Muslims. But we refused. They were furious. They insulted us a lot and cursed us and our beliefs.”

I’ve been reading a lot on ISIS and this article in particular really affected me. It’s the story of Narin, a fourteen-year-old Yazidi girl who was taken captive by ISIS. It’s her story of captivity up until she was able to miraculously escape. It’s a good read so I highly suggest you read it, especially if you don’t know much about what’s happening with ISIS.

Islam is not peaceful

Those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it. This is one of the many things running through my head. What happened in Manchester is terrible and my heart goes out to the families affected by it. But I’m seeing a trend that is just repeating itself over and over and over again. There is a terrorist attack, people start hashtagging pray for ________, profile pictures go up with the flag of that country overtop of it, after a week or so, it goes quiet, no one speaks of what happens, no one remembers. Wash, rinse, repeat. I’m guilty of this too, I’ve done it too. But we can’t come to a solution when no one wants to address the problem. Twenty-two year old Salman Abedi, child of Libyan refugees (Libya being an Islamic country), detonated a nail bomb killing not only himself, but 22 people, youngest being 8 years old. Children are missing, now even, many more injured. This is the worst attack England has seen in 12 years. But this will all just fade away in a week or two because no one wants to say anything because feelings are way too important. ISIS has claimed this attack on as their own. Whether or not that’s true, they still have. And not to burst bubbles, ISIS does represent Islam. Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. It’s right in the name. But just like the cries of “not all muslims are terrorists,” well not all muslims are good either. Whether we want to agree or disagree, the Quran and the Hadith is full of passages commanding the death of infidels or nonbelivers. 109 verses to be specific if you wanted to know. But wait, I hear you saying, the Bible has commandments about that too! And yeah, it’s true. The Christian Bible does talk about wiping out nations that didn’t believe in God. But the thing is, that isn’t still followed today. That isn’t practiced today. Jihadism is. Terrorism is. We need to stop being so apathetic to this. Islamic ideology, political Islam, does not coincide with western culture, unless as a man you agree with beating your wife when she doesn’t obey, perhaps killing her if she tries to flee from the abuse, and/or marrying children. As a woman, having to have male guardianship-be it husband, son, father, uncle- in order to leave the house, vote, have a license. As a woman having your wardrobe dictated to you, under the fear of being beaten for removing your head coverings. And if you happen to be part of the LGBT community, you’d lose your life, possibly by being thrown off a building. It’s time to wake up. This has gone on long enough. I’m tired of this cycle. If we don’t stop it, we can say goodbye to western society as we know it because Islam and western society cannot mix. It’s why Sweden and Germany are basically rape countries now. England has had 2 terrorist attacks since the beginning of 2017. And now the Jihad in the Philippines. Islam is leaving destruction in its wake. And I’m done living in this cycle. Islam is not a religion of peace. Wake up!

ISIS affiliate Boko Haram has been totally crushed, Nigerian government says

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari said on Saturday that his country’s armed forces had crushed the last remaining stronghold of notorious terror group Boko Haram, driving the militants out of their “Camp Zero” in northern Sambisa Forest, USA Today reported. Boko Haram, which pledged allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and stepped up coordination with the latter organization earlier this year, was founded in 2002 and launched a violent uprising in 2009. According to humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders, as of late 2015, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimated the group’s rebellion had displaced nearly 1.4 million people. Read more.

kokiri85  asked:

How do you think Trump's attack on Syria compares with past presidents in terms of overreaching war powers? Is it really any more extreme than the norm?

Yes and no. In a lot of ways it’s similar to recent executive overreach in foreign policy (I wrote about that history here). 

Where it’s unique, at least in terms of the post-9/11 wars, is that it’s 1) an attack on a state actor and 2) it’s not remotely covered by any declaration of war or authorization for use of military force. 

The first point the — fact that this involved regime targets — makes it different from current U.S. intervention in Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Somalia. In all of those fights, U.S. troops are opposing non-state actors including the Islamic State (despite their own claims, ISIS is not a government in the way the Bashar al-Assad regime is a government), al Qaeda, the Taliban, AQAP, and al Shabaab.

The second point — lack of any congressional authority — applies to all of the United States’ present military interventions, but it applies doubly to this attack on Syria. 

You see, the 2001 (Afghanistan) and 2002 (Iraq) Authorizations for Use of Military Force (AUMF) allowed the president to go after the perpetrators of 9/11 and the Saddam Hussein regime, respectively. Those missions are long over.

Now, the 2001 AUMF in particular has been stretched to cover warmaking against basically any Islamic terrorist organization anywhere in the Mideast or Africa with any connection to al Qaeda ever, even if the organization in question didn’t exist back in 2001. 

That’s ridiculous — in practice it means an unlimited, endless war on terror waged at presidential whim — but it’s not nearly as ridiculous as the suggestion that either of these documents could somehow authorize an attack on a sovereign (and, yes, brutal and inhumane) government with which they are obviously not concerned.

The closest comparison is the 2011 NATO/U.S. intervention in Libya, which was likewise sold in its initial incarnation as a humanitarian endeavor against a bad government mired in civil war. 

The analogy is not exact, of course, but it is instructive to look at how poorly that turned out: The grim result is an ISIS-filled power vacuum, continued chaos, and good evidence that U.S. involvement prolonged and deepened civilian suffering. Syria has nearly four times Libya’s population in a tenth of the space. If the same thing happens there, it will be much worse.

EDIT: Whoops, just noticed I accidentally linked to this post from The Onion in my first line. Look at that too, but this Politico piece is what I intended to reference.