is the worst kind of person

Books That, When People Recommend Them For [Specific Reason], Make Me Want to Stab My Eyes Out (Part I)

The theme is: books with bad LGBT+ rep and people should stop recommending them for those looking for great rep.

  • Down Among the Sticks and Bones by Seannan McGuire — Can’t get into the why unless I spoil it for you, but just know, it employs literally the worst trope that has plagued stories of LGBT+ people since forever. I swear to god if I see another person recommend this book because of the wlw element, I’m going to fight. 
  • And I Darken by Kiersten White — Should I tell you how many times the readers were told how bad being gay is without any kind of correction/assurance that it’s not? Hint: It’s a lot. Sickening.
  • The Half Bad Trilogy by Sally Green — Same principle as the first. The Gay (as an aspect; the characters were there, though) wasn’t even in the series until book two, and then book three happens and I only ask: why did you even bother. Both of them deserved better. 

Also, I’m turning this into a tag game because I love tag games. :-) Rules are simple: tell me what books you wish people would stop recommending and why! No theme and no set amount of books! Just rant and go, pour the salt my dudes. Then tag friends! 

Tagging: @heretherebebooks @bindings-and-beginnings @the-knights-who-say-book @anassarhenisch @relevy @lilymaidofgallifrey @reading-goblin @books-and-cookies @bvkspine @bookcub @howlsmovinglibrary @magic-in-every-book @bluestockingbookworm @mlledevoltaire :-))))

The preliminary character summary for Ripley found in Lumberjanes V. 1

Ripley is everybody’s best friend. Extremely high-energy and passionate about everything, Ripley is the kind of person who does things and is, as a result, always the first one to attack a problem head-on, usually without thinking about the consequences of her actions. She is ferociously loyal to her friends, almost to the point of blindness. She likes to keep the mood light and believes that the happiness of her friends is more important than anything else. Unfortunately, she seems to have the worst luck out of everyone. When things don’t go well, she can be moody and impulsive. She has a sense of who she is that is unusually strong for a twelve year old, and she thinks she’s pretty awesome. (She is right.) She likes to dance and is really good at playing the drums for a twelve year old. She would never admit it, but horror movies scare the crap out of her. She is Jo’s next-door neighbor outside of camp. 


On the first day of camp, she snuck into the craft cabin and used a pair of safety scissors to cut her own hair, resulting in a choppy, adorably uneven mess of dark hair. She prefers t-shirts and things she can move around in over any other style of clothing. She is generally unkempt but not unhygienic. (I am thinking a t-shirt over a long-sleeved shirt for her? Because that’s what I wore when I was 12. Or possibly a Henley because she’s so flippin’ rad.)

azlinne  asked:

“Oh, oh my god! It was an accident! I’m so sorry!” Dark/Wilfy

Bang!

There’s a certain kind of silence after someone gets shot in a small room. Shock on all sides as the person processes their pain and the fact they’ve just been shot, as the people around them realize someone is hurt and someone is now brandishing a gun, and the wielder of said gun realizing they’ve hurt someone and now potentially will come to hurt others.

Silence.
Then, chaos.

“Oh-Oh my god- it was an accident! I’m- I’m so- I’m so sorry!” Wilford gasps, dropping his gun as Dark takes a step back.

This feels familiar in the worst kind of way, Dark staring with wide-eyed, soundless shock at the blood on his hands.
His blood.

Fitting that while it’s on his hands it’s still black.

“Dark? Dark are you still with me?” The doctor fades into view, and it’s with a small shock Dark realizes he’s somehow ended up on the floor.

Then the burning sets in.
A flaming agony that tears through him, beginning in his stomach and traveling up.

Old scars broken open again, both physical and mental.
Dark mixes past with present, the lines blur.

He’s lost.

Finally, the world fades into a blissful black.

best/worst trait of the signs
  • Aries: passionately creative / chronic backstabber
  • Taurus: always prepared / Likes Thing Done A Certain Way
  • Gemini: says the sweetest things / is literally two different people
  • Cancer: ride or die kind of friend / manipulative flirt
  • Leo: shower you with praise / MY EGO
  • Virgo: highly organized / what are boundaries?
  • Libra: can talk to anyone about anything / gossipy af
  • Scorpio: puts in the work when they're passionate about something / sucks the joy out of everyone around them when depressed
  • Sagittarius: makes you feel like the most important person in the world / throws big baby tantrums
  • Capricorn: improv master, always joining in on the joke / cannot handle pressure
  • Aquarius: really funny / vicious dirty fighter
  • Pisces: generous af / passive aggressive af

Goodness I made another oc.

This is Kaitlyn Cooper. She’s not the brightest in the land.

At home, she is quite troubled and has a lot of troubles. Though she’s the same age as Mugs. Though she takes her problems out on anyone that’s sweet and kind. She’s a bully.

Personality: Mean
Hair: Not natural blonde
Style: Cool kid wanna be.

She cannot work well and has the worst grades in school. She picks fights all the time and is injured all the time. She is very uncooperative and won’t do any work in group projects.

Though, if you get to know her, shes kind. She loves cute things and is normal girl.

(Little sister to Jenny. She never talks about her sister because of her father, who is abusive)

Ps. She never leaves the house without pants and a long sleeve shirt or sweater. She has bruises all over from her father because she misbehaves.


Response: YES WE NEEDED A BULLY HNNNNGH. Imma make a crew to go along with her :’3

Thanks for the submission!

a quick psa

just because you say you have no animosity towards poc, disabled people, lgbt+ people, fat people, muslims, etc. does NOT mean you are not racist, homophobic, ableist, fatphobic, islamophobic, et cetera. bigotry comes in all kinds of forms and just because you don’t present the violent, poster-child-opressor kind, does not mean you aren’t a bigot. quiet, tolerant bigots can be some of the worst kinds (example: passively laughing or staying quiet at racist jokes, using “gay” as an insult, using somebody’s weight or identiy in an argument, “not to be racist, but..” statements.. i could go on).

and btw, people who aren’t bigots shouldn’t have to consistently say they are not. if somebody calls you out, listen to that person, especially if they come from a marginilized group. think about what you did, rather than immediately saying “but that wasn’t even offensive!!”

other than just not saying offensive things,!you do not get to decide who you offend or if you were offensive. however, you do get to decide how you handle what you did and what you learn.

not everybody has to be an activist but nobody should be a bigot, even passively. check your behavior.

Caught myself trying to vent/rant again, that’s a tricky thing to stop doing. It’s so easy to go off about something that’s bothering me like talking about it’s gonna change anything. I could just sum up everything I was gonna say with, “people are garbage” because damn people are garbage. No need to elaborate, three words will suffice every time. Plus I’m not really being true to myself when I complain, I’m not that kind of person. Don’t know why or when I started doing that so much, it’s a poor habit and isn’t doing me any justice. Need to kick that.

I wish I knew more genuine people, the only cool people I meet are on here. Everyone in my reality, save like two people, is just the worst. So many uncaring, selfish people. So many cruel assholes. Ugh.. people are garbage. I cannot wait to leave this place and these people far behind me. Gross overuse of the word people but whatever. I’m too tired to make the words look nice.

Rare Collection of 100 Introvert Quotes That Will Make You Feel Understood

Originally posted by water-aesthetics

Dear introverts, it’s difficult to understand you. Many people don’t comprehend that solitude and feeling alone are different things. As an introvert, you know that your solitude is a sacred space where you can recharge. We encourage you to have a look at these amazingly thoughtful and profound quotes, which will resonate with all introverts.

Keep reading

The signs as I’ve known them

Aries : passionate about everything but nothing’s ever their fault even when it definitely is. If they aren’t the center of the attention then what even is the point of living. Tries to be cool but is actually just really mad about everything.

Taurus : goes from entirely in control and well grounded to a flying rage machine in a heartbeat, something of a straight shooter but isn’t afraid of getting too deep.

Gemini : either the sweetest person ever who will always be there for you or the embodiment of every bad sorority girl stereotype regardless of gender

Cancer : either they cry all the time and love all their friends with overwhelming passion, or do that but are terrified of anyone knowing they actually care about anything so layer it under 9 billion layers of cynicism and Grump™

Leo : shining star made of smiles, wants to be an intellectual and goes through phases of being exactly that but goes back to being Not Intellectual the minute they stop being serious then forget to go back for like a month

Virgo : sure they’re organized as heck but their opinion of themselves is 6 times higher than is probably appropriate though you can bet money they probably hate themselves because of latent issues from their childhood

Libra : happy fading into the background, great team player who’s always off in dreamland until their friend needs em at which point their emotional state can best be described as watching a tree grow from a seedling to a 50 foot tall redwood in the span of 4 seconds

Scorpio : isn’t actually dark/spooky/mysterious but try convincing them of that, the kind of person who will say they “just get people, you know?” even if they definitely do not get people, but hey their heart is in the right place it’s just usually five feet ahead of where it’s supposed to be

Sagittarius : the best to be around when they’re paying attention to you, the worst when they aren’t there, takes 9 years or 9 nanoseconds to text you back, hilarious and sociable, dissociating to. a different planet while still being able to sink a perfect shot in beer pong I don’t get it

Capricorn : so grounded they might be dead, if they’re a chick they’re the best friend ever and everyone should have one, if they’re a bro they’re a Bro™ who takes being a manly, Good Friend way too far, emotions who? Never heard of em.

Aquarius : the sweetest person but you need to be a level 600 friend for them to be consistent with you. not into the. whole “planning ahead thing” and are only happy in a relationship if they’re constantly moving in that relationship whether it’s being perpetually single or having a volatile love life in general drama happens and it takes them a month to notice it

Pisces : if a children’s sports competition had a personality it’d be a Pisces, all in immediately and happy to go along with what their friends want but if they get hurt all hell breaks loose

another point i want to make–

i’m not a big langst fan, because i feel like a lot of it relies on vilifying the other members of the cast for the sake of making lance look less appreciated/loved. i know people have fun with it in fanfics, and all the more power to them (i mean this sincerely; i know there’s a push-back against langst, but i have nothing against it as long as it doesn’t seep into canon analysis), because fanfic is a free-for-all-playground, but it’s not my thing. 

in terms of canon… 

while we as an audience know that lance is super insecure, not everyone else does. you can say that pidge is mean for labeling lance as a “goofball”, since he internalizes this and starts to genuinely believe it–or you can realize that she meant it all in good fun and had zero intent to seriously hurt his feelings. assigning malice to her casual, playful insult isn’t really fair to her. she cares about lance a lot. remember when she completely changed her tune about leaving in season 1 because lance was hurt? remember when she screamed for lance in season 2 after he got hit at beta traz? remember that she specifically thought back to lance trying to befriend her at the garrison when saying that she wanted to be closer to her teammates? 

the team likes lance as a person. they enjoy having him around. he’s their friend. it’s why they mess with him like this. do any of them look like they’re making fun of him because they dislike him? no. 

hell, keith sincerely tried to cheer lance up by joking about him being bad at math! and it kind of worked! 

now, does lance interpret a lot of this in the worst possible way because he’s insecure? absolutely. does this mean everyone else is to blame for how he feels? no. they simply don’t understand the extent of his issues. they’re fighting a war, as lance himself reminded keith; they don’t have the mental energy to devote to fussing over lance’s feelings all the time.

it’s complicated because you can’t blame lance for being insecure either; it’s all just a series of misunderstandings, really. if lance were to run off because he thinks he’s the unnecessary seventh wheel, i imagine they’d all be shocked and really upset

but blue?

blue has no such excuse. blue understands the situation perfectly. she knows exactly what lance is feeling. if anyone in the universe would know that lance is insecure, it would be blue. she can send ideas directly into his mind without any effort, and yet she chose to remain completely silent and shut him out instead. no explanation, no reassurance, no goodbye, nothing. she basically just slammed the door in his face and let him figure the rest out. 

she knows exactly what kind of assumptions lance would make after being shut out. she knows that he feels like a seventh wheel even when he does have her support. she knows that he hinges his identity on her (”mrs. blue lion”). she knows that he’s very possessive of her (’we’re very happy together! very happy!”). she knows that he calls himself lancey-lance. hell, she can probably name every single member of lance’s family. 

it’s no coincidence that blue finally responded to allura when she expressed self-doubt. that’s something that blue recognizes quite well since lance doubts himself so much.

it’s one thing for someone to be clueless about how lance feels and say something that accidentally upsets him–keith in particular, since he’s a “loner”–and it’s another entirely to be 100% aware and let him suffer anyway. she’s supposed to be his lion, his old girl, his best girl, but she left him out in the cold in such a pointlessly cruel (and dangerous, honestly, considering how much it delayed lance entering the battle) way. 

this right here is canon langst, from the last source i would have thought of. 

we’d better get a damn good explanation for her behavior in season 4.

anonymous asked:

Hey, you're awesome, thanks for existing, basically ^_^ Anyway, I wanted to know if you have any tips on how to write different personalities? My characters (all of them) always end up with the same default personality that I fall back on. Thanks!

Thanks for your question, darling!  I think most of us have struggled with this – after all, we’re conditioned to one way of thinking, feeling, and acting for as long as we live.  That doesn’t necessarily mean we write characters like ourselves, though.  In fact, many of us have a “default character” that’s sassier than we are, sweeter than we are, or in some way different enough from us that we still feel like we’re writing a character.

The problem, then, isn’t that we can’t visualize a different personality than ours.  On the whole, we can.  What we’re missing are the small details that make it feel whole – otherwise, it’s like painting the same room six different colors and trying to pass it off as six different rooms.  Different dominant traits can’t hide the fact that you’re working with one template!

So the question we’re left with: what are the traits we’re missing?  And how can we change them to create a unique and whole personality?


Three Types of Character Traits

There are, as the title suggests, three major categories of personality traits as I see it: fundamental traits, acquired traits, and detrimental traits.  A well-rounded character needs some of each to be three-dimensional and realistic.

Fundamental Traits

The fundamental traits of a person’s character are not as simple as interests and preferences; they are the very base of all decisions and desires.  They are either learned in early life or developed over a long period of time, rooting deeply into the personality.  A few examples of fundamental personality traits include:

  • Upbringing – The word choice here is conscious, as upbringing encompasses many different aspects of a person’s development.  Consider who raised them, and with what morals and practices they were raised to adulthood.  Consider their influences, both familial, social, and in media; consider the relationships that were normalized during their development, as well as the living conditions (financially, emotionally, environmentally, etc.).  The people, places, emotions, and conflicts made common during a person’s developmental period are essential to their personality in adulthood.  This is why psychologists often draw present-day problems back to a person’s childhood memories – because those formative years can subconsciously dictate so much of a person’s future!
  • Values – These may not coincide with the values a person is raised to hold, but upbringing certainly has an influence on this. A person’s values will direct the course of their life through every decision, large and small.  You don’t need to outline everything your character believes is important – every moral and every law they agree/disagree with. But those values which stand above others will give your character purpose.  A few of my favorite examples are: Jane from Jane the Virgin (whose initial storyline is heavily based on her religion and desire for a beautiful love story, as well as her childhood influences who inspired these values) and Han Solo from Star Wars (whose character development rested upon his values shifting from money and gratification to more honorable things).
  • Beliefs – Different from values, beliefs are a more general set of guidelines for how a person believes things are supposed to be.  Beliefs can also be a source of great conflict, as a character tries to stay aligned with their beliefs despite other values or desires.  These beliefs can be established systems, like religion or politics; they can also include more personal belief systems, like nihilism or veganism.  A characters beliefs, like their values, can change over the course of the story – but even if a character is questioning one system of belief, like religion or pacifism, they should have other belief systems in place to govern some of their activity.
  • Reputation – A lot of human activity, whether consciously or not, is dictated by how others perceive them (or how they believe others perceive them).  There are two types of reputation: personal and passing.  For instance, a woman named Sally who gains a personal reputation of sleeping around will behave in reaction to this reputation – either sleeping around because everyone already expects it of her, or specifically not hooking up because she wants to shake this reputation, or developing a thicker skin to deal with the rumors until it passes.  A man named Billy who, because of his tattoos, bears a passing reputation as an intimidating man will either try to soften his demeanor with strangers, own up to the image, or at least learn to expect judgment from strangers as a consequence.
  • Self-Image – Also relevant to a person’s behavior is the way they perceive themselves, which can often have little to do with their reputation.  A lot of self-image is based on definitive moments or phases in the past.  For instance: for several years after I started wearing contacts and cutting my hair, I still saw myself, in dreams at night, with long hair and glasses.  One of my friends, similarly, could not seem to notice when boys would flirt with her during sophomore year – because she still saw herself as an awkward middle schooler with braces, and not as the charming cheerleader with the great smile.
    Inversely, self-image can be inflated, causing character to behave as though they are funnier, smarter, or more prepared than they truly are (see: the rest of my sophomore acquaintances).  This can be an overlooked character flaw opportunity – or flawportunity…

Originally posted by alliefallie


Acquired Traits

Now we move on to the acquired traits of personality, which are the ones you’re more likely to find on a character sheet or a list of “10 Questions for Character Development”, alongside a million other things like their zodiac sign and their spirit animal.  But the traits I’m about to outline are a little more relevant to a character’s behavior, and more importantly, how to make this behavior unique from other characters’ behavior.  The following traits will be learned by your characters throughout their life (and their story), and are more likely to shift and grow with time:

  • Interests – I know, I had to reach deep down into my soul to think of this one.  But it’s true!  Interests, both in childhood/adolescence and in adulthood, are an important part of a character’s personality and lifestyle.  Childhood interests both reveal something about the character (for instance: my nephew loves trains, Legos, and building, suggesting a future interest in construction or engineering) and create values that can last for a lifetime.  Current interests affect career choice, social circles, and daily activity for everyone.  Forgotten or rejected interests can be the source of pet peeves, fears, or bad memories. There’s a reason I’ll never play with Polly Pockets again, and it 100% has to do with bloody fingertips and a purse that wouldn’t open.
  • Sense of Humor – This can be a little hard to define, understandably.  If you were to ask me what my sense of humor is, I’d probably start with a few stupid memes, pass by Drake & Josh on the way, and somehow wind up telling you bad puns or quoting Chelsea Peretti’s standup comedy. A person’s sense of humor can be complex and contradictory!  Sometimes we just laugh at stuff because someone said it in a funny way.  But anyway, to help you boil this down to something useful: take a look at a few kinds of comedy and relate it to your character’s maturity level.  Do they laugh when someone lets out a toot?  Are they the kind of person to mutter, “That’s what she said,” or simply try not to laugh when something sounds dirty?  Can puns make them crack a smile?  Do they like political humor?  Do cat videos kill them?  Is their humor particularly dark?  Can the mere sound of someone else laughing make them laugh?  Figure out where your character’s sense of humor is, and you’ll feel closer to them already.
  • Pet Peeves – For every interest a person may have, and everything that makes them laugh, there’s something else that can piss them off, large- or small-scale.  Are they finnicky about their living space and neatness? Do they require a lot of privacy? Do certain sounds or behaviors drive them crazy?  What qualities are intolerable in a romantic interest for them? What kind of comments or beliefs make them roll their eyes?  If you need help, just try imagining their worst enemy – someone whose every word or action elicits the best eye-rolls and sarcastic remarks and even a middle finger or two – and ask yourself, what about this person makes them that mortal enemy?  What behaviors or standards make them despicable to your character?  That’s all it takes.
  • Skills – Everybody has them, and they’re not just something we’re born with.  Skills can be natural talent, sure, but they’re also cultivated from time, values, and interests.  What is your character okay at?  What are they good at?  What are they fantastic at?  Maybe they can cook.  Maybe they have a beautiful eye for colors.  Maybe they have an inherent sense of right and wrong that others admire. Maybe they’re super-athletic or incredibly patient or sharp as a tack or sweet as a cupcake.  Maybe they know how to juggle, or maybe they’re secretly the most likely of all their friends to survive a zombie apocalypse.  Where do they shine?  What would make someone look at them and think, “Wow, I wish I were them right now”?
  • Desires – A good way to “separate” one character from the next is to define what it is they want, and then use every other detail to dictate how they pursue that goal.  Every real person has a desire, whether they’ve defined it or not – whether it’s something huge, like fame or a family of five with triplet girls and a beach house on an island, or something small, like good grades for the semester.  These desires can cause a person to revise their values or forsake their morals; and these desires can conflict with other people’s desires, influencing how people interact with each other.  Remember that every character is living their own story, even if it’s not the story you’re telling.
  • Communication Style – A majorly overlooked character trait in pop fiction is unique communication styles.  Having every character feel comfortable arguing, or bursting out with the words, “I love you,” is unrealistic.  Having every character feel paralyzed at the idea of confronting a bully or being honest to their spouse is also unrealistic.  There should be a healthy mix of communicators in a group of characters. Some people are too softspoken to mouth off at their racist lab partner.  Some people wouldn’t see their girlfriend kissing another guy and just walk away without saying something.  Some people just don’t react to conflict by raising their voice; some people enjoy sharing their opinions or giving the correct answer in class.  Boldness, social skills, and emotional health all have a part to play in how people communicate their thoughts – so keep this in mind to create a more realistic, consistent character.
  • Emotional Expression – Along the same lines but not the same, emotional expression is more focal on feelings than thoughts.  If you’ve ever heard of the fight-or-flight response, the different types of anger, the stages of grief, or the five love languages, then you’re aware of different “classifications” of emotional expression and management.  Read up on some of those things, and think about how your character handles emotions like happiness, sadness, fear, anger, loneliness, paranoia, and so forth.

Detrimental Traits

While acquired traits are certainly more enjoyable to brainstorm during the creation process, detrimental traits are as important – or even more important – to the character’s wholeness as well as their role in the story.  Not only do these negative or limiting traits make your character realistic, relatable, and conflicted – they create a need for other characters and their strengths to move the plot forward.  A few examples of detrimental traits include:

  • Flaws – Character flaws are probably the first thing that came to your mind while reading this, but they’re the essence of the category.  Flaws in a character’s personality, morality, or behavior can be a source of character development; they set an individual on their own path and provide a unique motivation for them.  Having Character A struggle with sobriety while Character B learns to be a more patient mother can do a lot to separate their stories and personalities from each other.  Even if certain flaws don’t reach a point of growth, they create a third aspect to personality and force us, as writers, to be more creative with how our characters get from Point A to Point B, and what they screw up along the way.
  • Fears – Everyone has fears, whether we’re conscious of them or not – and I’m not talking about phobias or “things that give you shivers”.  Just like everyone has a primary motivation throughout life (romance, family, success, meaning, peace of mind, etc.), everyone has a fear behind that motivation (loneliness, failure, emptiness, anxiety).  We all have something we don’t want to happen places we never want to be and things we never want to do.  We’ve all been in situations that mildly bothered others but wildly affected us at the same time.  For me, it’s a lack of autonomy, or in any way being forced to do something or be somewhere against my will.
    What does this mean for me?  It means that when other people have nightmares about being chased by an axe murderer, I have nightmares about being kidnapped and locked up.  It means that I’m continually aware of my “escape plan” if something goes wrong in my living situation, and I’m hypersensitive to someone telling me, “You have to do this.”  It means I struggle to follow rules and usually don’t get along with authority figures because I have to assert my independence to them.  It’s irrational and continual and doesn’t just affect me in one situation; it subconsciously directs my steps if I let it.  That’s how real, guttural fears work. Phobias are only skin deep, and they don’t make you feel any closer to the character.

Originally posted by giantmonster

  • Secrets – Even goody two-shoes Amber from the swim team, with her blonde blonde hair and her good good grades, has a secret.  Everybody does, even if it’s not a purposeful, “I have a deep, dark secret,” sort of secret. We have things we don’t tell people, just because they’re embarrassing, or painful, or too deep to get into, or they don’t paint us in a good light.  While the secrets themselves tell a lot about a person, so do the reasons a person keeps a secret.  Hiding something out of shame suggests a person is prideful, or critical of themselves, or holds themselves to a higher standard than they hold others.  Hiding something painful suggests that the person struggles to handle sadness or regret, or that they feel uncomfortable showing raw emotion in front of loved ones. And so on and so forth.
  • Conflict – Whether internal, interpersonal, legal, moral, societal, or what have you, conflict will limit your character’s actions at every turn.  A story is nothing without conflict driving the plot in different directions and causing your character to rethink both their plans and their lifestyle.  Without Katniss’s moral conflict over killing other tributes, The Hunger Games would be the story of a girl who entered an arena, killed a lot of people, and lived the rest of her life rich and comfortable.  If Luke Skywalker didn’t have interpersonal conflict with Darth Vader, Star Wars would be the war-story of a guy who joined a rebellion and then… yeah.
  • Health – Physical, mental, and emotional health is a huge limiting factor for characters that often goes untouched, but it’s valuable nonetheless.  Not everyone has a clean bill of health and can jump off trains without pulling a muscle, go through a traumatic life experience without any hint of depression or anxiety, or watch a loved one die in gunfire and shove right on without emotional repercussions. Consider creating a character who’s not perfect – who isn’t perfectly in-shape or abled, or neurotypical or stable day-to-day, or completely clean and clear of residual heartache, unhealthy relationships, or bad emotional habits.  Don’t define them by these traits, of course – but don’t feel that you can’t write a character with health issues without writing a “sick character.”

So this post got ridiculously long, but I hope it works as a reference for you when creating unique characters.  Remember that you don’t need to outline all of this information to create an individual, realistic character.  These are just some relevant ideas to get you started!  It’s up to you, as the writer, to decide what’s necessary and what’s excessive for your creative process.

Still, I hope a majority of this is helpful to you!  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in and we’ll get back to you :)  Good luck!

- Mod Joanna ♥️


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

“you can come too if you want” is the worst thing you could ever say to me i literally need like a very precise kind of invitation or else i assume you don’t want me to go and i know that makes me the WORST kind of person but it’s just the truth lmao don’t worry i hate me too !!!

Wonder Woman and Subverting Born Sexy Yesterday

The awesome born sexy yesterday video is putting that trope on the forefront of everyone’s minds, which is great. Critique away!

I just wanted to point out a few of the ways Patty Jenkins, Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, and the writers subvert the worst aspects of the trope.

I’ll try to be as vague as possible but SPOILERS:

1. Diana is not embarrassed by nudity of any kind. Yes, her outfit is revealing. BUT one guess as to who gets naked in this film. Hint: it’s not the person the trope usually applies to.

2. Diana is untouched by a man by virtue of the plot – she’s never even seen one before. But the film makes a point of calling out her knowledge of sex. It even heavily implies that Diana takes charge of her own pleasure, be it via self-pleasure or bisexual/pansexual Diana ftw!

3. Steve is her guide to the outside world, but so is Candy. Steve is her guide to the outside world, but never once is Diana abnormally impressed with his insights or his teaching moments. Ice cream vendor, though? He should be very proud.

4. The born sexy yesterday trope is predicated on the idea that a woman falls in love with the first schlub she sees and worships him. That emphatically does not happen. In fact, it’s a running gag that Steve is trying to convince Diana that he’s above average. Only when he proves it to her – through his kindness and his bravery – does she fall for him.

5. The thing that happens in the middle? Not the “prize” saved for the hero’s reward like it is usually is in the Born Sexy Yesterday trope.

So, yes, Diana is a fish out of water. Yes Gal Gadot is a stunner. But those two elements are not what make born sexy yesterday such an egregious violation of female agency. Wonder Woman does not exist to be taught by a mediocre man who she holds up as god’s gift than for no other reason than that he’s breathing near her.

Instead, she learns and teaches equally in reciprocation with a true partner–aka my favorite feminist fantasy trope.

Office-mate who loves CNN but doesn't understand how televisions work is destroyed by that which she loves most.

I work in a small office with only 6 people. The way the office is broken up I share my office with another person, so we’re essentially facing each other. It’s away from the other offices, so we’re kind of left to our own devices. I’ve been working here for about three years now, and have always gotten along with my office-mate. My old office-mate left to start a family, so I’ve been alone for a bit before they hired Marge.

Marge is what you’d find if you googled “worst office-mate.” She brings in smelly food she eats at her desk, she plays loud music in our shared space (even after being asked not to), she fights with the boss on every little thing, she’s nosy (always asking me where I’ve been when I walk back into the office, and I’ve literally caught her listening in at the bosses door). She asks me invasive questions, and when I finally snapped at her to mind her own business she acted like I’d personally assaulted her.

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Writing Antagonists: (Aka, Your Villains and Bad Guys)

The antagonist is often either one of the most fun things to write, or the most dreaded. But either way, they are a key element of the story, and that cannot be ignored. So, let’s talk about how to make a really great antagonist.

You may have in the past met a writer or teacher or whomever who insists on using the words “protagonist and antagonist” over words like “hero and villain.” Personally, I am not so stingy about it, I feel that I know what you mean anyway so it doesn’t really matter- what there is a legitimate reason as to why you should at least try to think of your villain as your antagonist instead.

And that reason is connotation. Well, denotation too, really- villain and antagonist aren’t completely the same thing, but I’m bringing it down to connotation. 

Simply said, when you think of the word “villain”, you’ll think something like “that’s the bad guy in the story.” And when you think of the “antagonist”, you probably think “that’s a fancy word for villain, aka the bad guy in the story.”

But antagonist isn’t just a fancy word. It’s a fancy concept. It means “the guy that opposes the good guy.” That can be on any argument or view. When writing your antagonist is to remember that nothing is black/white, good/bad thinking, and that includes your antagonist.

Let’s map out the steps to making a complex villain- aka, an antagonist.

First, remember that your antagonist (usually) is a person, just like your protagonist. It might help to develop them outside of their intentions first, and put a person to the upcoming reputation.

Background:

Chances are, your antagonist didn’t just rise up out of the ground ready to kill. They came from somewhere. Your readers don’t even have to know everything about your antag’s backstory, but you do, if you want to really understand them. It often holds the key reason as to why your antagonist is where they are. The drive behind anger, revenge, change, or pleasing someone else can come from the events in their background.

Why do they hold the beliefs they hold? Were they raised that way? Were they taught by some mentor figure? Were they cover from a reality they couldn’t bear? Are they trying to please someone, or get revenge on someone who displeased them? The answer should be in their background.

Motives/Beliefs:

Remember, every villain is a hero in their own mind. They believe that what they are doing is necessary, even if they recognize that it is unpleasant. What are they fighting for? Why does it matter to them so much, that they are willing to overlook all the harm they do?

“The Greater Good”: This is one of the more common and understandable villain motives. They believe that what they are doing now is paving the way to a better future. But keep in mind that what your antag views as a “better future” may be very, very different than the average opinion. Maybe a “better future” for them is a genocidal purge or the world ending in flames. Who knows.

That’s not the only type of motive. Be creative. Work with the information you established in your character’s background to find the most reasonable motive.

Tipping Point:

This is going to be related to your background and motive in an interesting way. Think of your antagonist as a character who has already completed their Character Arc and reached a negative end. Look at the points of change on the character arc- the ones that push your character farther down their path. What are those events? Those are the tipping points that prompted your character towards becoming they way they are now- those key moments where your character had a choice, and they chose to become bitter, hateful, vengeful, cold, or other negative things.

These could be the deaths of loved ones, the promptings of a mentor, or a moment of injustice that made them realize that the world isn’t always kind.

Personality/Actions:

This is the part where you develop them outside of their intentions. How do they behave? 

It’s tempting to just say that your villain is a villain because they torture and kill people. But those are not the only things that make a villain a scary or serious threat. Some characters might jump to violence easier than others. Some might be more into psychological torment. Some might actually seem really charming or persuasive, which is frightening in it’s own way- they might actually be tricky enough to confuse you into making bad decisions on your own. Think about your character’s background again. What makes the most sense for them as a person?

Presentation:

This is how your antagonist comes across to others. Keep in mind that your reader and your other characters don’t know your antagonist like you do. How does this person present to the world? 

-Are they open to discussion/negotiation?

-Are they open about their intentions?

-How quick are they to violence?

-What are their methods of war?

-When you meet them, are they charismatic, quiet, charming, vulgar? Do they have a sense of humor, or are they stoic?

-Do they seem to enjoy what they are doing, or do they express regrets even as they do it?

Moral Complexity:

What are they willing to do to achieve their goals? Do they have weaknesses in their personal lives?

1. Do they have noble ends behind their controversial means?

2. Is there a line even they won’t cross?

3. Do they have someone/something that they care about?

4. Do they prefer to do the killing/torturing etc themselves or do they just give the order?

Remember that if your antagonist does have any of these moral weaknesses, they are not going to want to show it. One has to keep up intimidating appearances, after all. 

Speaking of appearances…

Appearance:

This part is here to tell you what not to do. There are certain appearances that are getting really old with villains.

1. Dressing in all black. Why do they even do that? It’s time to stop associating black with “bad” and white with “good”. It just isn’t like that, so stop making villains all dark and stuff.

2. Scars. I think scars are pretty cool, don’t get me wrong. But if there is no relevant reason for it to be there, don’t talk about it all the time. That goes for all characters, not just villains. Like the color black, scars are not just a villain thing. Everyone has them. Don’t associate them with “bad.”

3. Sexy. I get the idea that making a villain attractive makes them harder to hate, but that can be kind of a cop out of actual complexity. Again, if there is no legitimate reason to make your villain sexy, then don’t. It’s not necessary.

4. Ugly. I hesitate to call any traits inherently ugly, but if you’re striving to make your character unpleasant looking just because they’re bad, then once again, you are associating feature=evil, which is not creative at best and seriously socially harmful at worst. 

Basically, your villains should be just as diverse as anyone else. You don’t need stereotypes to make them scary. Sometimes it’s scarier than anything else to just have an average person. It sort of adds to the idea that anyone could be a villain. And that’s pretty frightening.

Key Point:

- Complicate your villains. They’re not just Evil McEvilpants. 

That’s it for now, but like anything else in writing, antagonists have a lot of possibility and exceptions. But that was your basic rundown on the things to consider when making a complicated antagonist. 

~Penemue

i mean im an adult, i guess, if that’s the word for it. a lot of things i used to care about i just say “Fuck It” and let go. 

but it’s incredible to me that there’s still so many passages to my soul. how just a group of teenagers looking at me and laughing makes my teeth hurt. how someone’s comment sends me back to high school bullying. how i am constantly asking myself are they even really my friends? 

i don’t know. i never throw myself birthday parties because my worst nightmare would be that nobody shows. i just wonder if there’s ever a time that your last insecurities let go. i’ve only ever found that kind of freedom at the honey lips of tequila. i want to be brave at two pm on a sunday. i want to actually not care what they say. i want to be the kind of witch that laughs through the burning.

i don’t know. i hope i’m learning.

Being unmotivated is not an excuse.

During these past couple of months, I had this urge of working extremely hard to actually get better at school–my academics. I studied everyday and I worked hard and put every ounce of effort into all of my work. I never let anything slide. When exams came around, I got nervous, I was unmotivated, I was not ready to acknowledge the fact that I was about to sit these exams. 

When I did, every word I wrote on those pages were not good enough, slowly I felt like everything I worked for in the past couple of month were slipping through my fingertips. I was saddened. Exam after exam I felt myself slowly drifting away, loosing myself to  pieces of paper I prepared my self so hard for. I had nights were I was so sad, and just slept unsoundly. I was sad. Extremely sad. And I knew that when I got my grades back, I wasn’t going to get the grades I wanted–and I didn’t. I got average grades and there I felt myself feel extremely angry and just unmotivated to do anything after pursuing these exams. 

My teachers have hope that I will get better grades and that I could easily bump myself up to higher points. They had faith in me, when I didn’t. How was I supposed to continue studying if I was feeling unmotivated? If I didn’t believe in myself completely? 

These past couple of months hit me like a ton of bricks. People were getting better grades than me, and to be honest it did bother me. Why? Because I want to feel that satisfaction, that relief to receiving those amazing grades. I want to feel acknowledged, I want to feel like I accomplished something. I want to feel like I am ready to take on the world and its challenges without the feeling that I was not able to accomplish any of the challenges. 

I pitied myself. I felt sorry for myself. 

Then came a day, were I woke up and finally realized that feeling sorry for myself, feeling pity for myself, feeling unmotivated, feeling like I am not smart enough, feeling like I am not worth it is not an excuse for me anymore. Those feelings are never going to get me to that top university. The universities are looking for people who can take initiatives, people who are capable of taking control of their own life, people who don’t give up that easily, and finally people who don’t get unmotivated so easily and keep trying their best even when they are at their worst. 

That is the kind of personality I need, that is the kind of personality which I will have. I will not stop till I get the grades that I want, I will work my hardest and smartest from now on, I will learn how to prioritize my social life from my school life. I need to learn how to balance. And most importantly I need to learn how to not give up so easily and feel unmotivated so easily. Being unmotivated is not an excuse for me anymore, and nor should it be for you. Being unmotivated wont allow you to get those grades, those accomplishments. 

Writers have been using the tarot to help them structure their stories for a long time, but how do they do it? With the right spreads, of course! This spread was designed with character creation in mind. Even if you don’t intend for the character in question to be the protagonist of your tale, you should still approach this spread from the character’s perspective—and doesn’t every character consider themselves the protagonist? (Maybe, maybe not. But this spread will help you flesh them all out just the same!)

1. The Character’s Archetype
What kind of character is this? What is their core personality, the archetype that will best describe the kinds of philosophy, demeanor, and mannerisms this character will have?

2. The Character’s Best Personality Trait
Which trait will end up being the most positive for this character? Which will best help them to be well-received by others and/or accomplish their goals?

3. The Character’s Worst Personality Trait
Which trait will end up being the most negative for this character? Which will be most likely to damage their relationships with others and impede their goals?

4. The Character’s Motivation
Why does this character get up in the morning? What motivates them psychologically, drives them forward, and gives them a sense of purpose?

5. The Character’s Goal
What tangible accomplishment is this character seeking? What physical item or event does this character think will make the most positive difference in their life?

6. The Sidekick
Who does this character best get along with? What kind of person is likely to end up being this character’s best friend or partner?

7. The Villain
Who does this character most clash with? What kind of person is likely to end up being this character’s enemy?