is the worst kind of person

you know a finale is horrible when the only thought you have afterwards is “haha okay this was fun, but where is the REAL finale”

anonymous asked:

Do you think that Nick is being praised a little too much? I mean is that how low a bar a man has to go over to be eligible to be the "good guy"? Personally I am disgusted by him. He literally did nothing, he was an accomplice. Why do fans of the show like him so much? Because June could have sex with him every once in a while to hold onto something real, to keep her wits about herself? I think he is a traitor and the worst kind at that. Being an ally is being more than what Nick ever was! :<

There’s quite a few things here to reply to so I’m gonna try to do my best.

First of, male characters definitely have a much lower bar to be considered a “good guy”, this is clear across lots of fandoms! It’s not right, but it’s certainly not exclusive to Handmaid’s Tale.

I feel like the fandom disagrees on a whole, but yes, I do mostly agree with you anon. I definitely wouldn’t go as far as to say I’m disgusted by him (for me personally) but I don’t like him as much as everyone else, nor do I ship him and June. I will of course reblog gifs of them and gifs of Nick to keep a fair balance on the blog, but they’re not my cup of tea. (Side note: I’m currently drinking tea out of my Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum mug which seemed appropriate to mention).

We don’t know what the outcome of season one was yet, whether Nick did betray the system he supported into creation to give June a chance at being saved, or whether he was tricking her. It was left open in the book as well. If they were the resistance, he was taking a huge risk and going against the system and potentially risking death. If they were to find out he was involved, of course.

I do think he regrets his involvement in the creation of Gilead, at least to some extent. I don’t know if he started to think this way before June, or he slowly started to see how awful it was after he met her. Because of what happened to the previous ‘Offred’ and how he found her, I’m inclined to think the latter. Although I don’t ship them, I do think he - at the very least - cares for June immensely. He wouldn’t be with her otherwise because she could sell him out at any moment, and the proof would be in the baby in her stomach, so it was a risk for him to maintain the relationship too. He has a vested interest in keeping June and the baby alive.

June’s decision to be with Nick is definitely, in my opinion, a way for her to give herself choice and agency back, something that Gilead has ripped away from her and other women, particularly Handmaids but also Marthas, econwives and - for some of them - the wives (not all of them).

He did willingly join the Sons of Jacob on his own, he wasn’t forced into the regime like a lot of the population was, despite joining it initially because he needed a job and wanted to support his family. Could he have left before it all went to shit, when he really started noticing the cracks? Of course.

I do think he regrets his involvement of Gilead personally, but it’s hard to know. He hasn’t ever outright said anything about his involvement in the beginning, all that was said that he was sorry it was happening to June specifically.

So while I agree in a sense, that I do think he gets praise for some things he hasn’t done and I don’t like him (or June/Nick) as much as other people, I don’t think he’s a wholly irredeemable character. It really depends how the show proceeds from here. I’m interested to see!

anonymous asked:

headcanon: everyone thinks that Saejima is some kind of cool badass because of the scar on his eyebrow that he probably got in a prison fight or something after killing 18 people............. but in reality he got scratched in the face by a cat because he didn't understand animals having personal space as a kid.

his worst scar….he still thinks back on that day and feels bad for that cat

here’s my initial bb19 thoughts on the cast

  • fuck cameron i’m glad he’s gone
  • literally why does every season have to have a guy named cody. do they have a quota or what
  • paul coming back is… eh i guess…. not the worst person to bring back but like…. i really wish zach rance was there
  • christmas is my girl im ride or die on christmas
  • ramses is good i like him a lot. 
  • i like raven too. 
  • megan’s profile was kinda funny so i think i like her too.
  • and alex i like alex
  • im not big on kevin tbh he’s kinda slimy but idk if it’s the slimy kind of asshole i’ll love to hate or just. hate.
  • i dont like jessica either
  • neutral on everyone else

amatalefay  asked:

For the character ask: Ashildr.

(worth noting that since we essentially see four different people when it comes to her, I’ll mean the Hell Bent Ashildr unless stated otherwise)

general opinion: fall in a hole and die | don’t like them | eh | they’re fine I guess | like them! | love them | actual love of my life 

hotness level: get away from me | meh | neutral | theoretically hot but not my type | pretty hot | gorgeous! | 10/10 would bang

hogwarts house: gryffindor | slytherin | ravenclaw | hufflepuff (I reckon original Ashildr was Gryffindor, though)

best quality: I love how she just doesn’t have any delusions about what kind of person the Doctor is, and how she doesn’t hesitate to tell him how fucking wrong she is, and just the level of perspective on the universe she has by the end of it all

worst quality: I mean, there’s such a thing as too much perspective, really, I think she’s kind of lost how to look at the little things. also, she’s very inherently self-serving. (not so much Trap Street!Ashildr or the original, to be fair, but the other versions)

ship them with: Clara? kinda?

brotp them with: Clara, Captain Jack

needs to stay away from: idk the girl has earned some piece so I guess keep her away from the Master but ho boy would I love to see her go up against Missy

misc. thoughts: I think she’s such a fascinating character, the idea of an immortal who can’t remember their life (as someone with a god awful episodic memory, I find it very very relatable, whoops), and it was explored in a neat way with us seeing four very different versions of her even if they had their overlaps

So Taako has a pretty bad charisma score, right? Bad enough that his bluffs totally depend on the dice. But Justin is a smooth ass talker, see Taako rattling off a totally believable story for Roswell after one loop and his (considering the stress) plausible reasons for keeping the mannequin around in Reunion Tour. If Taako’s a performer with a fast tongue and a kind of magnetic personality, what’s the In Fiction explanation for that bad bad Charisma?

I offer a solution. Taako’s ears are tells. GIANT tells. The elf can barely hide a thought to save his fucking life. They droop when he’s sad, perk up when he’s interested, pin back when he’s pissed, and worst of all twitch when he’s lying. Not subtle twitches, oh no sir, huge ticks like a horse flicking away flies. So whatever Taako’s face and mouth are saying, his ears are telling the truth. Only reason he lasted as long as he did performing was because Taako honestly loved it, and that love was clear as crystal to every audience.

13 Reasons Why Character Nastiness Levels

1. Hannah 3/10, She was hurting, but sadly pushed away the people that could have helped her.

2. Clay 2/10, Can act irrationally because of his emotions and will do/say dumb stuff, but ultimately has a good heart.

3. Tony 3/10, Extremely patient with lil ole Clay, does come off as a lil bit condescending, but means well. 

4. Jessica 5/10, She slapped Hannah and bam, friendship over, but she still kept an eye on her and was generally pleasant towards her.

5. Justin 7/10, LOOK, I’m not excusing what he did, but he DID ultimately realize he was wrong to keep the secret from Jess and cut off Bryce completely. Also, no kid deserves the home life he has.

6. Bryce 10000000000000/10, This lil fucker can rot in hell. He’s the one who started it all and HE NEEDS TO GO DOWN.

7. Alex 6/10, What he did probably didn’t seem like a big deal to him, but it enabled other guys to treat Hannah like an object, not a person. At least he had the decency to feel horrible about it. (also I hope he’s ok).

8. Zach 6/10, He was trying to be nice to Hannah, but she shot him down, and he did not take that well. Like Alex, at least he had the decency to feel bad and I’m glad we get to hear why he didn’t say anything.

9. Tyler 8/10, WHAT THE FUCK. DON’T STALK PEOPLE, IT’S THAT SIMPLE CREEP.

10. Sheri 7/10, Honestly, the only reason it’s so high is because of poor Jeff. Otherwise, she did come clean and tried to make amends and was generally a kind person. I feel like Hannah just couldn’t handle keeping a secret that awful.

11. Courtney 9/10, What she did wasn’t the worst by far, but how she handled everything after was horrendous, just because she wasn’t comfortable in her own skin.

12. Ryan 9/10, Same as Courtney. His crime wasn’t that terrible, but I hate how he never felt bad about it AT ALL and just kept going around like he was so entitled.

13. Marcus 9/10 Same as the above two. These 3 were a series of shitty moments, but the way they handled the aftermath was just disgusting.

14. Skye 3/10, Not on the tapes or even associated with Hannah, but pretty prevalent in Clay’s life. She’s tough and rude, but luckily lets Clay in. Very happy they rekindled their friendship.

15. Jeff -10000000/10, THE SWEETEST HUMAN BEING ON THE ENTIRE GODDAMN SHOW. DID NOT DESERVE WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM. HE JUST WANTED TO HELP HIS NERDY FRIEND LIVE LIFE

There are two kinds of people in the world
  • Person A: 4kids dub is the worst thing to happen to anime, it ruins everything and is a disgrace to the original content.
  • Person B: *through the tears* this is the third pun and fourth shade the show has done in five minutes and everyone is drinking hot sauce cause they can't have alcohol, this dub is a gift from above.
Wonder Woman and Subverting Born Sexy Yesterday

The awesome born sexy yesterday video is putting that trope on the forefront of everyone’s minds, which is great. Critique away!

I just wanted to point out a few of the ways Patty Jenkins, Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, and the writers subvert the worst aspects of the trope.

I’ll try to be as vague as possible but SPOILERS:

1. Diana is not embarrassed by nudity of any kind. Yes, her outfit is revealing. BUT one guess as to who gets naked in this film. Hint: it’s not the person the trope usually applies to.

2. Diana is untouched by a man by virtue of the plot – she’s never even seen one before. But the film makes a point of calling out her knowledge of sex. It even heavily implies that Diana takes charge of her own pleasure, be it via self-pleasure or bisexual/pansexual Diana ftw!

3. Steve is her guide to the outside world, but so is Candy. Steve is her guide to the outside world, but never once is Diana abnormally impressed with his insights or his teaching moments. Ice cream vendor, though? He should be very proud.

4. The born sexy yesterday trope is predicated on the idea that a woman falls in love with the first schlub she sees and worships him. That emphatically does not happen. In fact, it’s a running gag that Steve is trying to convince Diana that he’s above average. Only when he proves it to her – through his kindness and his bravery – does she fall for him.

5. The thing that happens in the middle? Not the “prize” saved for the hero’s reward like it is usually is in the Born Sexy Yesterday trope.

So, yes, Diana is a fish out of water. Yes Gal Gadot is a stunner. But those two elements are not what make born sexy yesterday such an egregious violation of female agency. Wonder Woman does not exist to be taught by a mediocre man who she holds up as god’s gift than for no other reason than that he’s breathing near her.

Instead, she learns and teaches equally in reciprocation with a true partner–aka my favorite feminist fantasy trope.

anonymous asked:

Hey, you're awesome, thanks for existing, basically ^_^ Anyway, I wanted to know if you have any tips on how to write different personalities? My characters (all of them) always end up with the same default personality that I fall back on. Thanks!

Thanks for your question, darling!  I think most of us have struggled with this – after all, we’re conditioned to one way of thinking, feeling, and acting for as long as we live.  That doesn’t necessarily mean we write characters like ourselves, though.  In fact, many of us have a “default character” that’s sassier than we are, sweeter than we are, or in some way different enough from us that we still feel like we’re writing a character.

The problem, then, isn’t that we can’t visualize a different personality than ours.  On the whole, we can.  What we’re missing are the small details that make it feel whole – otherwise, it’s like painting the same room six different colors and trying to pass it off as six different rooms.  Different dominant traits can’t hide the fact that you’re working with one template!

So the question we’re left with: what are the traits we’re missing?  And how can we change them to create a unique and whole personality?


Three Types of Character Traits

There are, as the title suggests, three major categories of personality traits as I see it: fundamental traits, acquired traits, and detrimental traits.  A well-rounded character needs some of each to be three-dimensional and realistic.

Fundamental Traits

The fundamental traits of a person’s character are not as simple as interests and preferences; they are the very base of all decisions and desires.  They are either learned in early life or developed over a long period of time, rooting deeply into the personality.  A few examples of fundamental personality traits include:

  • Upbringing – The word choice here is conscious, as upbringing encompasses many different aspects of a person’s development.  Consider who raised them, and with what morals and practices they were raised to adulthood.  Consider their influences, both familial, social, and in media; consider the relationships that were normalized during their development, as well as the living conditions (financially, emotionally, environmentally, etc.).  The people, places, emotions, and conflicts made common during a person’s developmental period are essential to their personality in adulthood.  This is why psychologists often draw present-day problems back to a person’s childhood memories – because those formative years can subconsciously dictate so much of a person’s future!
  • Values – These may not coincide with the values a person is raised to hold, but upbringing certainly has an influence on this. A person’s values will direct the course of their life through every decision, large and small.  You don’t need to outline everything your character believes is important – every moral and every law they agree/disagree with. But those values which stand above others will give your character purpose.  A few of my favorite examples are: Jane from Jane the Virgin (whose initial storyline is heavily based on her religion and desire for a beautiful love story, as well as her childhood influences who inspired these values) and Han Solo from Star Wars (whose character development rested upon his values shifting from money and gratification to more honorable things).
  • Beliefs – Different from values, beliefs are a more general set of guidelines for how a person believes things are supposed to be.  Beliefs can also be a source of great conflict, as a character tries to stay aligned with their beliefs despite other values or desires.  These beliefs can be established systems, like religion or politics; they can also include more personal belief systems, like nihilism or veganism.  A characters beliefs, like their values, can change over the course of the story – but even if a character is questioning one system of belief, like religion or pacifism, they should have other belief systems in place to govern some of their activity.
  • Reputation – A lot of human activity, whether consciously or not, is dictated by how others perceive them (or how they believe others perceive them).  There are two types of reputation: personal and passing.  For instance, a woman named Sally who gains a personal reputation of sleeping around will behave in reaction to this reputation – either sleeping around because everyone already expects it of her, or specifically not hooking up because she wants to shake this reputation, or developing a thicker skin to deal with the rumors until it passes.  A man named Billy who, because of his tattoos, bears a passing reputation as an intimidating man will either try to soften his demeanor with strangers, own up to the image, or at least learn to expect judgment from strangers as a consequence.
  • Self-Image – Also relevant to a person’s behavior is the way they perceive themselves, which can often have little to do with their reputation.  A lot of self-image is based on definitive moments or phases in the past.  For instance: for several years after I started wearing contacts and cutting my hair, I still saw myself, in dreams at night, with long hair and glasses.  One of my friends, similarly, could not seem to notice when boys would flirt with her during sophomore year – because she still saw herself as an awkward middle schooler with braces, and not as the charming cheerleader with the great smile.
    Inversely, self-image can be inflated, causing character to behave as though they are funnier, smarter, or more prepared than they truly are (see: the rest of my sophomore acquaintances).  This can be an overlooked character flaw opportunity – or flawportunity…

Originally posted by alliefallie


Acquired Traits

Now we move on to the acquired traits of personality, which are the ones you’re more likely to find on a character sheet or a list of “10 Questions for Character Development”, alongside a million other things like their zodiac sign and their spirit animal.  But the traits I’m about to outline are a little more relevant to a character’s behavior, and more importantly, how to make this behavior unique from other characters’ behavior.  The following traits will be learned by your characters throughout their life (and their story), and are more likely to shift and grow with time:

  • Interests – I know, I had to reach deep down into my soul to think of this one.  But it’s true!  Interests, both in childhood/adolescence and in adulthood, are an important part of a character’s personality and lifestyle.  Childhood interests both reveal something about the character (for instance: my nephew loves trains, Legos, and building, suggesting a future interest in construction or engineering) and create values that can last for a lifetime.  Current interests affect career choice, social circles, and daily activity for everyone.  Forgotten or rejected interests can be the source of pet peeves, fears, or bad memories. There’s a reason I’ll never play with Polly Pockets again, and it 100% has to do with bloody fingertips and a purse that wouldn’t open.
  • Sense of Humor – This can be a little hard to define, understandably.  If you were to ask me what my sense of humor is, I’d probably start with a few stupid memes, pass by Drake & Josh on the way, and somehow wind up telling you bad puns or quoting Chelsea Peretti’s standup comedy. A person’s sense of humor can be complex and contradictory!  Sometimes we just laugh at stuff because someone said it in a funny way.  But anyway, to help you boil this down to something useful: take a look at a few kinds of comedy and relate it to your character’s maturity level.  Do they laugh when someone lets out a toot?  Are they the kind of person to mutter, “That’s what she said,” or simply try not to laugh when something sounds dirty?  Can puns make them crack a smile?  Do they like political humor?  Do cat videos kill them?  Is their humor particularly dark?  Can the mere sound of someone else laughing make them laugh?  Figure out where your character’s sense of humor is, and you’ll feel closer to them already.
  • Pet Peeves – For every interest a person may have, and everything that makes them laugh, there’s something else that can piss them off, large- or small-scale.  Are they finnicky about their living space and neatness? Do they require a lot of privacy? Do certain sounds or behaviors drive them crazy?  What qualities are intolerable in a romantic interest for them? What kind of comments or beliefs make them roll their eyes?  If you need help, just try imagining their worst enemy – someone whose every word or action elicits the best eye-rolls and sarcastic remarks and even a middle finger or two – and ask yourself, what about this person makes them that mortal enemy?  What behaviors or standards make them despicable to your character?  That’s all it takes.
  • Skills – Everybody has them, and they’re not just something we’re born with.  Skills can be natural talent, sure, but they’re also cultivated from time, values, and interests.  What is your character okay at?  What are they good at?  What are they fantastic at?  Maybe they can cook.  Maybe they have a beautiful eye for colors.  Maybe they have an inherent sense of right and wrong that others admire. Maybe they’re super-athletic or incredibly patient or sharp as a tack or sweet as a cupcake.  Maybe they know how to juggle, or maybe they’re secretly the most likely of all their friends to survive a zombie apocalypse.  Where do they shine?  What would make someone look at them and think, “Wow, I wish I were them right now”?
  • Desires – A good way to “separate” one character from the next is to define what it is they want, and then use every other detail to dictate how they pursue that goal.  Every real person has a desire, whether they’ve defined it or not – whether it’s something huge, like fame or a family of five with triplet girls and a beach house on an island, or something small, like good grades for the semester.  These desires can cause a person to revise their values or forsake their morals; and these desires can conflict with other people’s desires, influencing how people interact with each other.  Remember that every character is living their own story, even if it’s not the story you’re telling.
  • Communication Style – A majorly overlooked character trait in pop fiction is unique communication styles.  Having every character feel comfortable arguing, or bursting out with the words, “I love you,” is unrealistic.  Having every character feel paralyzed at the idea of confronting a bully or being honest to their spouse is also unrealistic.  There should be a healthy mix of communicators in a group of characters. Some people are too softspoken to mouth off at their racist lab partner.  Some people wouldn’t see their girlfriend kissing another guy and just walk away without saying something.  Some people just don’t react to conflict by raising their voice; some people enjoy sharing their opinions or giving the correct answer in class.  Boldness, social skills, and emotional health all have a part to play in how people communicate their thoughts – so keep this in mind to create a more realistic, consistent character.
  • Emotional Expression – Along the same lines but not the same, emotional expression is more focal on feelings than thoughts.  If you’ve ever heard of the fight-or-flight response, the different types of anger, the stages of grief, or the five love languages, then you’re aware of different “classifications” of emotional expression and management.  Read up on some of those things, and think about how your character handles emotions like happiness, sadness, fear, anger, loneliness, paranoia, and so forth.

Detrimental Traits

While acquired traits are certainly more enjoyable to brainstorm during the creation process, detrimental traits are as important – or even more important – to the character’s wholeness as well as their role in the story.  Not only do these negative or limiting traits make your character realistic, relatable, and conflicted – they create a need for other characters and their strengths to move the plot forward.  A few examples of detrimental traits include:

  • Flaws – Character flaws are probably the first thing that came to your mind while reading this, but they’re the essence of the category.  Flaws in a character’s personality, morality, or behavior can be a source of character development; they set an individual on their own path and provide a unique motivation for them.  Having Character A struggle with sobriety while Character B learns to be a more patient mother can do a lot to separate their stories and personalities from each other.  Even if certain flaws don’t reach a point of growth, they create a third aspect to personality and force us, as writers, to be more creative with how our characters get from Point A to Point B, and what they screw up along the way.
  • Fears – Everyone has fears, whether we’re conscious of them or not – and I’m not talking about phobias or “things that give you shivers”.  Just like everyone has a primary motivation throughout life (romance, family, success, meaning, peace of mind, etc.), everyone has a fear behind that motivation (loneliness, failure, emptiness, anxiety).  We all have something we don’t want to happen places we never want to be and things we never want to do.  We’ve all been in situations that mildly bothered others but wildly affected us at the same time.  For me, it’s a lack of autonomy, or in any way being forced to do something or be somewhere against my will.
    What does this mean for me?  It means that when other people have nightmares about being chased by an axe murderer, I have nightmares about being kidnapped and locked up.  It means that I’m continually aware of my “escape plan” if something goes wrong in my living situation, and I’m hypersensitive to someone telling me, “You have to do this.”  It means I struggle to follow rules and usually don’t get along with authority figures because I have to assert my independence to them.  It’s irrational and continual and doesn’t just affect me in one situation; it subconsciously directs my steps if I let it.  That’s how real, guttural fears work. Phobias are only skin deep, and they don’t make you feel any closer to the character.

Originally posted by giantmonster

  • Secrets – Even goody two-shoes Amber from the swim team, with her blonde blonde hair and her good good grades, has a secret.  Everybody does, even if it’s not a purposeful, “I have a deep, dark secret,” sort of secret. We have things we don’t tell people, just because they’re embarrassing, or painful, or too deep to get into, or they don’t paint us in a good light.  While the secrets themselves tell a lot about a person, so do the reasons a person keeps a secret.  Hiding something out of shame suggests a person is prideful, or critical of themselves, or holds themselves to a higher standard than they hold others.  Hiding something painful suggests that the person struggles to handle sadness or regret, or that they feel uncomfortable showing raw emotion in front of loved ones. And so on and so forth.
  • Conflict – Whether internal, interpersonal, legal, moral, societal, or what have you, conflict will limit your character’s actions at every turn.  A story is nothing without conflict driving the plot in different directions and causing your character to rethink both their plans and their lifestyle.  Without Katniss’s moral conflict over killing other tributes, The Hunger Games would be the story of a girl who entered an arena, killed a lot of people, and lived the rest of her life rich and comfortable.  If Luke Skywalker didn’t have interpersonal conflict with Darth Vader, Star Wars would be the war-story of a guy who joined a rebellion and then… yeah.
  • Health – Physical, mental, and emotional health is a huge limiting factor for characters that often goes untouched, but it’s valuable nonetheless.  Not everyone has a clean bill of health and can jump off trains without pulling a muscle, go through a traumatic life experience without any hint of depression or anxiety, or watch a loved one die in gunfire and shove right on without emotional repercussions. Consider creating a character who’s not perfect – who isn’t perfectly in-shape or abled, or neurotypical or stable day-to-day, or completely clean and clear of residual heartache, unhealthy relationships, or bad emotional habits.  Don’t define them by these traits, of course – but don’t feel that you can’t write a character with health issues without writing a “sick character.”

So this post got ridiculously long, but I hope it works as a reference for you when creating unique characters.  Remember that you don’t need to outline all of this information to create an individual, realistic character.  These are just some relevant ideas to get you started!  It’s up to you, as the writer, to decide what’s necessary and what’s excessive for your creative process.

Still, I hope a majority of this is helpful to you!  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in and we’ll get back to you :)  Good luck!

- Mod Joanna ♥️


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

Fire Emblem Fates vs. Siblings Cutscenes Ranked from Least to Most Extra

vs. Xander (Birthright)

  • his cutscene isn’t even that extra it’s just sad
  • he’s putting on a tough face but it’s obvious he doesn’t truly want to fight you
  • most people don’t rly want to fight xander at this point either
  • doesn’t even verbally threaten you or anything (ignore sword)
  • so the purple wave shit and the ceiling crumbling a lil is p wack but in the context of a big boss fight? pretty tame

vs. Takumi (Conquest)

  • the shaky camera angles? wild
  • the omnious pitter-patter of Hoshidan soldiers? wild
  • making said Hoshidan soldiers back away so he can slowly inch towards you? wild
  • “yOU ABANDONED YOUR FAMILY AND HOSHIDO” sudden close up “NOW PAY FOR YOUR BETRAYAL”
  • however, we, the player, expected this
  • if anything this is one of the most controlled scenes we have w takumi in conquest bc he does not call us “nohrian scum” even once

vs. Leo (Birthright)

  • the amount of fucking edge in this video? the audacity of your goth wizard brother? breathtaking
  • it’s a cemetery which is, right off the bat, edgy as hell
  • weird purple vape shit surrounding the graves
  • you don’t even hear his footsteps or the horse this is the scene when you truly realize how much power leo has garnered from the goth gods
  • the pony????? has horns??????
  • orb
  • “the sentence…………………………………….IS DEATH”
  • but using the same reasoning as takumi’s fight cutscene
  • we expected this

vs. Hinoka (Conquest)

  • ok so i feel like most people would argue hinoka isn’t that extra
  • but also consider this: the fucking helicopter
  • so hinoka rides in w her pegasus and that’s fine that’s expected except there are a million sakura petals just fluttering in the wind for some reason
  • JUMPS off her pegasus mid air just floats for awhile and then uses her spear?????? as a helicopter????? i????????
  • gets back on the pegasus ????? ???? ???? somehow ??? ??
  • hinoka’s english va adds a very. surreal aspect to this scene for me and i’m not sure why

vs. Camilla (Birthright)

  • this is the last thing you see right before you die
  • her footsteps???? her boots??????? her booty??????? big anime tiddy?????????
  • when i first watched this scene i was torn between a mixture of thirst and dread
  • why
  • “ah! i see you missed your big sister ;)” “you’re sooooo cute”
  • if you watch this you’re automatically going to hell i’m sorry
  • for some reason this scene never fails to make my depression skyrocket

vs. Ryoma (Conquest)

  • somehow ryoma just sitting solemnly while waiting for you is 100x worse than xander sadly turning around
  • in the general the raijinto is wild as hell but i feel like this cutscene just takes you to the next plane of existence
  • “you………. have done well so far………………. BUT THAT WAS JUST PRACTICE”
  • ok so like is ryoma sad that he has to fight you??? probably
  • but he’s so fucking ready and i feel like nintendo is just. trying very hard to convince us, the players, that ryoma doesn’t want to hurt us but it’s also kind of hard to believe when he gets this into it
  • he’s got his arms out just begging you to try it and you think he’s done but nope
  • ryoma goes on and starts to pose while the room just sets on fire which i feel is the highlight of this scene
  • as a big boss cutscene it’s not the worst thing in the world but it’s. definitely up there

so I was talking with @gitwrecked about the Space Dad mentality and how rare it is that Shiro gets to have fun like the other Paladins do. A lot of fic and art either assume Shiro’s the responsible character, or leave him out completely while all the Paladins are having fun - and that’s always bugged me, a bit. Shiro so rarely gets a chance to play those games, or make mistakes, or be smol, or be taken care of in any way. In fandom, Shiro’s almost always the Responsible One, whether that’s in charge of the team, assisting with the team’s personal affairs/relationship woes Via the giving of Dad Advice, etc. etc. Even the mentality that back at the Garrison Shiro must’ve been tight-laced, Perfect, and Always Responsible is just…it doesn’t make sense, to me. Considering everything he’s been through, can’t our Shiro be allowed some fun?

Shiro would’ve been a COMPLETE troublemaker back at the Garrison. Hardworking and dedicated, sure, but once he proved himself and climbed up the ranks, so to speak? Kid could get away with ANYTHING. Nobody can keep a straight face quite like Shiro. Nobody knows why there’s always one particular flight-bike returned with just a bit less fuel than the others, nope, no sir. No, nobody knows how the doors to the hangars were left unlocked and a trio of cows slipped in last night. Nope, definitely not. Shirogane? Nope, definitely not involved. What kind of person would think that of Innocent, Responsible Shiro?

Shiro gets away with a lot of stuff like this. Matt only eggs him on, the little troublemaker. The two of them would make SUCH a pair, wreaking havoc, always messing things up, and the worst part is Iverson can NEVER PROVE IT. If Matt has even half the hacking skills of Pidge? Nothing would be safe. The rosters? Weird how Shiro and Matt are always in the same classes. Any type of list? Funny that the mess hall’s serving chocolate cake for dinner for the fourth night in a row, how odd. The simulators? 

Dear lord, the simulators.

Fake missions. Weird Easter Eggs left behind in mission logs, so the freshmen are running these simulations and that’s definitely a duck that just flew past us, sir, how is a duck faster than this ship? Weird loopholes, one set of canyons that definitely loops you back to the beginning just after you exit. Missions with heavy-loss scenarios that light up at the end with a huge message saying APRIL FOOL’S. Just messing with everyone.

[Iverson: WHO LET HOLT INTO THE SIMULATOR PROGRAMMING?
Matt, deadpan, as the newbies running the simulation have to fly through a series of caves in a mountain that looks suspiciously like a nose (only access point is through the nostril): It’s my computer programming final, sir. 
Iverson, who didn’t check all the course syllabi: Shirogane, is this true?
Shiro, without batting an eye: Yes sir.]

In addition to the ability to lie their way out of every inquisition, Matt and Shiro are pretty clever at this. They don’t have to lie often because they don’t get caught. They’re extremely cautious, planning tricks weeks or months in advance, well worth taking the time to pull it off well and cover our tracks than it is to get caught and give up the whole game. (I’m not saying they were Weasleys of the Garrison, but.) 

I wonder if this is also one of the reasons Lance looks up to Shiro so much. Picture one night a very young and impressionable Lance sneaking out of his dorm after hours, trying to get a level up by gaining just one extra peek at the simulators (poor bab wants so badly to be fighter class), and in so doing caught the rarest of rare events: Shiro, sneaking out of the simulator programming room.

And Lance doesn’t mean to, but he stumbles right into a trashcan and makes a huge clatter and Shiro’s head whips up and the two of them just stare at each other. Lance’s heart is going a mile a minute, he’s going to get in trouble, that’s Takashi Shirogane, the straight-A Perfect Responsible Top Of His Class Pilot - 

Shiro draws breath. Lance winces, waiting for the reprimand.

“Can you keep a secret?” Shiro asks, and winks.

“Uh,” stutters Lance, floored.

And then the next day Lance is watching the simulator runs with his class, but for whatever reason the Simulator’s infected with some sort of weird bug. Anytime anyone fails at any part of the program the screen rains down confetti on them. Forgot to buckle your seatbelt? CONFETTI. Effed up that landing? CONFETTI. Turning to hurl into the main gearbox- 

“Shirogane,” Iverson growls, “Did you program this run?”

“Must be a glitch, sir,” Shiro says, completely straight-faced.

And Lance is a goner.

Imagine Your OTP

I remember this one time where two of my guy friends were sitting next to each other as always and when we received our scored test papers, one of them laughed at the other’s score and the argument they had was amazing

Person B: HOW COULD YOU?? HOW COULD YOU LAUGH AT ME WHEN I’M AT MY WORST??

Person A: Your score is so stupid haha what the hell—

Person B: THAT’S IT!! WE’RE THROUGH!

Person A: No— wait! Please, forgive me! I can change!

Person B: IT’S TOO LATE FOR THAT! YOU HAVE RIDICULED ME FAR ENOUGH! I AM FILING A DIVORCE!!

Person A: But— But what about our baby?!

Person B: I’M TAKING THE BABY WITH ME! HE DOESN’T DESERVE TO KNOW WHAT KIND OF FATHER HE HAS!

Person A: No!! Please, I love you!

Person C: What the fuck bro he just laughed at your test score how did you even turn that into something out of a drama jfc

Being unmotivated is not an excuse.

During these past couple of months, I had this urge of working extremely hard to actually get better at school–my academics. I studied everyday and I worked hard and put every ounce of effort into all of my work. I never let anything slide. When exams came around, I got nervous, I was unmotivated, I was not ready to acknowledge the fact that I was about to sit these exams. 

When I did, every word I wrote on those pages were not good enough, slowly I felt like everything I worked for in the past couple of month were slipping through my fingertips. I was saddened. Exam after exam I felt myself slowly drifting away, loosing myself to  pieces of paper I prepared my self so hard for. I had nights were I was so sad, and just slept unsoundly. I was sad. Extremely sad. And I knew that when I got my grades back, I wasn’t going to get the grades I wanted–and I didn’t. I got average grades and there I felt myself feel extremely angry and just unmotivated to do anything after pursuing these exams. 

My teachers have hope that I will get better grades and that I could easily bump myself up to higher points. They had faith in me, when I didn’t. How was I supposed to continue studying if I was feeling unmotivated? If I didn’t believe in myself completely? 

These past couple of months hit me like a ton of bricks. People were getting better grades than me, and to be honest it did bother me. Why? Because I want to feel that satisfaction, that relief to receiving those amazing grades. I want to feel acknowledged, I want to feel like I accomplished something. I want to feel like I am ready to take on the world and its challenges without the feeling that I was not able to accomplish any of the challenges. 

I pitied myself. I felt sorry for myself. 

Then came a day, were I woke up and finally realized that feeling sorry for myself, feeling pity for myself, feeling unmotivated, feeling like I am not smart enough, feeling like I am not worth it is not an excuse for me anymore. Those feelings are never going to get me to that top university. The universities are looking for people who can take initiatives, people who are capable of taking control of their own life, people who don’t give up that easily, and finally people who don’t get unmotivated so easily and keep trying their best even when they are at their worst. 

That is the kind of personality I need, that is the kind of personality which I will have. I will not stop till I get the grades that I want, I will work my hardest and smartest from now on, I will learn how to prioritize my social life from my school life. I need to learn how to balance. And most importantly I need to learn how to not give up so easily and feel unmotivated so easily. Being unmotivated is not an excuse for me anymore, and nor should it be for you. Being unmotivated wont allow you to get those grades, those accomplishments. 

Viktor-sans-Yuuri is an “I want to go home” type of drunk

When they’re together, Viktor and Yuuri are definitely ‘oh dear oh god oh no’ type of drunk. The worst of bad influences on each other. One-tequila-two-tequila-three-tequila-floor type drunk. They’re let’s play stripping games in this club type drunk. It’s literal canon at this point and we are #blessed to have had this knowledge bestowed upon us.

But Viktor by himself rolls up on a club and is like “Waddup I want my HUSBAND do u feel me??”

Yuuri by himself mostly reverts back to his old drunk self–mostly a normal person, kind of sad, does the same stupid shit only by himself–but catch a singular Viktor sitting at a table by himself, squinting into the distance and waiting for someone to tell him he can go home .

I miss you 😢😢😢 he texts Yuuri when he’s only been gone for an hour.

We agreed that you would stay there for two hours Yuuri texts back. You’re halfway there, baby. Don’t give up now.

“Aren’t you glad to be out of the house?” asks someone, probably someone Viktor doesn’t like very much, probably one of the sponsors Viktor is currently trying to shmooze. “God, it’s good to be away from the ball and chain! You’re married now, Nikiforov, you understand.”

“Literally the only thing I want to do right now is go home and hug my husband for an entire hour,” Viktor tells him, mournfully scrolling up his text history with Yuuri. “I miss him so much.”

“Did Viktor’s…husband… die?” that guy asks a colleague across the room several minutes later. “He’s acting like he…died?”

“No, Petrovich, he just married someone he actually likes.”

Viktor is now staring deep into a champagne cocktail. “Yuuri loves these,” he says.

“Are you totally sure,” says Petrovich, “That his husband didn’t die.”

“I saw him in an elevator on Tuesday.”

Petrovich watches Viktor down the entire champagne cocktail. “I thought only strippers drank those things.”

A Handful of Questions to Ask Yourself While Creating a Character

Compelling characters make compelling stories. Here’s a bunch of questions you can ask yourself while developing a character. 

1) What does your character want from life? What is their motivation? What drives them? Most people want things - it could be as small as wanting a sandwich, or something huge like wanting to change the world. Does your character want something? Does your character dream? What about? And if they don’t, why don’t they? 

2) Is your character shy? Outgoing? Insecure? Proud? Why are they the way they are? My favourite example of this question answered well is Ron Weasley from Harry Potter. He’s insecure because he doesn’t come from a wealthy family, has a bunch of older brothers who are all amazing in some form or way, his mother always wanted a daughter, Ginny, and so he doesn’t feel as wanted. Also, one of his best friends is the Chosen One, and the other is the brightest witch of her age - a cocktail that would make anyone doubt themselves. 

3) What kind of clothes does your character wear? Why? The way you dress says a lot about who you are. For instance, If a character wears designer clothes and the latest fashions, it shows that they have the means to keep up with the trends. However if they wear a medley of things bought second-hand, or buy cheap stuff from supermarkets, they might not have the money to spare on outfits, or maybe they just don’t care about fashion.

4) How does your character speak?  Speech patterns have origins. An accent, language, a dialect, all signify geography, social class, personality. It could be as simple as cussing too much. But be sure you know why your character speaks the way they do. And if it’s not a speech pattern you’re familiar with, do your research!

5) Likes and dislikes I sometimes give characters specific likes (”I like tomatoes”) or specific dislikes (”I dislike eggs”), simply because it humanises them. You don’t have to do this, or be as specific as that, if it doesn’t serve your story. But it’s definitely something you can consider. Everyone has those little things they love and hate, and you can go places with them. (”I hate eggs because my childhood bully threw an egg at me and scarred me for life.”) Be creative and have fun with it.

6) Who does your character love? Romantic attraction isn’t necessary to create a wholesome character. Nevertheless, if they are in love with someone, be sure to understand why they love someone. Love is at its best, a complicated emotion difficult to break down, but a relationship has to be believable. As a reader, I need to be able to look at a couple and think, yeah, I can see what their love is built on. 

7) What would their favourite songs be? This is not so much a question as it is a trick I use to get a better feel for who my character is. No matter what time period your story is set in, you can use this to understand your character better. Take your playlist and pick what songs they would enjoy. It says a lot about who they are. For instance, one of my characters would enjoy Western classical music and nothing else. Another character listens to the worst kind of pop and loves it. 

8) How does your character react under stress? Can they cope with it? Do they get tense? Angry? Teary? Why? Why not? How a person deals with stress is a vital part of their personality. Decisions taken under stress can be the worst you’ve ever made, or (depending on how you handle stress), can be effective solutions to problems. The way a person reacts to stress often has a lot to do with their background and upbringing. Example (this is a generalisation, of course): someone who comes from a difficult family background may have more extreme reactions to stress than someone who is well-adjusted and comes from a happy family. 

9) What does your character do when they’re alone? You’re often a different person alone than when you are with other people. The pretences and false faces come away, and all the little thoughts you usually ignore now have time to play in the open. Who is your character when they’re alone? What do they do? What do they think about? Why do they think about/do things in that way?

10) Where does your character fail? Characters must have flaws to be compelling. Nobody is perfect, and your character shouldn’t be either. Whether its insecurity or anger, or a lack of initiative, or smaller things like not being a good artist, or not being the best at sports–we all have personal failings and we all have things we aren’t good at. Consider: where does your character mess up? 

I hope this helps! Remember to have fun. Developing characters can be the most exciting thing. Keep an open mind while working. Happy writing! 

Bruce Wayne is a total Batman fanboy. He has a made to life replica of his favorite Batmobile in his garage and a room set off to the side with all the Batman memorabilia he’s collected over the years. He’s known for spending crazy amounts of money at auctions for Batman stuff and orders his own versions of everything.

No one even bats an eye when he puts in a huge order for batarangs. And he’s so happy about it because when he’d first started out as Batman getting supplies had been the worst part of the job. He’d had a million hoops he had to go through to keep his secret identity a secret. 

He’d thought he’d hated it when people became Batman obsessed, but after he got caught with a Batarang in his pocket at a charity event he decided to go with the fanboy persona. And it worked. 

His children think it’s hilarious and buy him all kinds of weird Batman merchandise. Like the crappily painted Batman figures shipped from China, Batman soap, the plastic masks every store sells, and their personal favorite the pajamas that say “My Batcave is my happy place”

Not all people are the worst, but let’s be realistic here: If you’ve tried to talk to your friends about your problems, and they laughed at you, ignored you, or told you that your problems don’t matter, it’s entirely possible those friends are assholes.

But it’s also possible they are perfectly normal human beings who just happen to be the wrong person to talk to about that particular problem.

Saying “you should talk to someone” is like saying “you should take some medicine.” So, what medicine? Because it kind of matters. You don’t want to treat insomnia with a high dose of laxatives and uppers. You don’t want to treat a floppy boner with that burning muscle relaxant gel that makes it feel like your skin is being devoured by fire ants.

If you don’t pick someone who knows about your situation, you may as well be rambling about thermodynamics to your cat. When you’re having money problems, asking for advice from your friend who’s on the verge of eviction could result in an extended, “Oh screeewwww yooooouuu …” At the same time you wouldn’t ask the rich, silver-spoon friend who thinks you can buy a house just by cutting back on coffee.

5 Mistakes You Make When Trying To Talk About Your Problems

Writing Antagonists: (Aka, Your Villains and Bad Guys)

The antagonist is often either one of the most fun things to write, or the most dreaded. But either way, they are a key element of the story, and that cannot be ignored. So, let’s talk about how to make a really great antagonist.

You may have in the past met a writer or teacher or whomever who insists on using the words “protagonist and antagonist” over words like “hero and villain.” Personally, I am not so stingy about it, I feel that I know what you mean anyway so it doesn’t really matter- what there is a legitimate reason as to why you should at least try to think of your villain as your antagonist instead.

And that reason is connotation. Well, denotation too, really- villain and antagonist aren’t completely the same thing, but I’m bringing it down to connotation. 

Simply said, when you think of the word “villain”, you’ll think something like “that’s the bad guy in the story.” And when you think of the “antagonist”, you probably think “that’s a fancy word for villain, aka the bad guy in the story.”

But antagonist isn’t just a fancy word. It’s a fancy concept. It means “the guy that opposes the good guy.” That can be on any argument or view. When writing your antagonist is to remember that nothing is black/white, good/bad thinking, and that includes your antagonist.

Let’s map out the steps to making a complex villain- aka, an antagonist.

First, remember that your antagonist (usually) is a person, just like your protagonist. It might help to develop them outside of their intentions first, and put a person to the upcoming reputation.

Background:

Chances are, your antagonist didn’t just rise up out of the ground ready to kill. They came from somewhere. Your readers don’t even have to know everything about your antag’s backstory, but you do, if you want to really understand them. It often holds the key reason as to why your antagonist is where they are. The drive behind anger, revenge, change, or pleasing someone else can come from the events in their background.

Why do they hold the beliefs they hold? Were they raised that way? Were they taught by some mentor figure? Were they cover from a reality they couldn’t bear? Are they trying to please someone, or get revenge on someone who displeased them? The answer should be in their background.

Motives/Beliefs:

Remember, every villain is a hero in their own mind. They believe that what they are doing is necessary, even if they recognize that it is unpleasant. What are they fighting for? Why does it matter to them so much, that they are willing to overlook all the harm they do?

“The Greater Good”: This is one of the more common and understandable villain motives. They believe that what they are doing now is paving the way to a better future. But keep in mind that what your antag views as a “better future” may be very, very different than the average opinion. Maybe a “better future” for them is a genocidal purge or the world ending in flames. Who knows.

That’s not the only type of motive. Be creative. Work with the information you established in your character’s background to find the most reasonable motive.

Tipping Point:

This is going to be related to your background and motive in an interesting way. Think of your antagonist as a character who has already completed their Character Arc and reached a negative end. Look at the points of change on the character arc- the ones that push your character farther down their path. What are those events? Those are the tipping points that prompted your character towards becoming they way they are now- those key moments where your character had a choice, and they chose to become bitter, hateful, vengeful, cold, or other negative things.

These could be the deaths of loved ones, the promptings of a mentor, or a moment of injustice that made them realize that the world isn’t always kind.

Personality/Actions:

This is the part where you develop them outside of their intentions. How do they behave? 

It’s tempting to just say that your villain is a villain because they torture and kill people. But those are not the only things that make a villain a scary or serious threat. Some characters might jump to violence easier than others. Some might be more into psychological torment. Some might actually seem really charming or persuasive, which is frightening in it’s own way- they might actually be tricky enough to confuse you into making bad decisions on your own. Think about your character’s background again. What makes the most sense for them as a person?

Presentation:

This is how your antagonist comes across to others. Keep in mind that your reader and your other characters don’t know your antagonist like you do. How does this person present to the world? 

-Are they open to discussion/negotiation?

-Are they open about their intentions?

-How quick are they to violence?

-What are their methods of war?

-When you meet them, are they charismatic, quiet, charming, vulgar? Do they have a sense of humor, or are they stoic?

-Do they seem to enjoy what they are doing, or do they express regrets even as they do it?

Moral Complexity:

What are they willing to do to achieve their goals? Do they have weaknesses in their personal lives?

1. Do they have noble ends behind their controversial means?

2. Is there a line even they won’t cross?

3. Do they have someone/something that they care about?

4. Do they prefer to do the killing/torturing etc themselves or do they just give the order?

Remember that if your antagonist does have any of these moral weaknesses, they are not going to want to show it. One has to keep up intimidating appearances, after all. 

Speaking of appearances…

Appearance:

This part is here to tell you what not to do. There are certain appearances that are getting really old with villains.

1. Dressing in all black. Why do they even do that? It’s time to stop associating black with “bad” and white with “good”. It just isn’t like that, so stop making villains all dark and stuff.

2. Scars. I think scars are pretty cool, don’t get me wrong. But if there is no relevant reason for it to be there, don’t talk about it all the time. That goes for all characters, not just villains. Like the color black, scars are not just a villain thing. Everyone has them. Don’t associate them with “bad.”

3. Sexy. I get the idea that making a villain attractive makes them harder to hate, but that can be kind of a cop out of actual complexity. Again, if there is no legitimate reason to make your villain sexy, then don’t. It’s not necessary.

4. Ugly. I hesitate to call any traits inherently ugly, but if you’re striving to make your character unpleasant looking just because they’re bad, then once again, you are associating feature=evil, which is not creative at best and seriously socially harmful at worst. 

Basically, your villains should be just as diverse as anyone else. You don’t need stereotypes to make them scary. Sometimes it’s scarier than anything else to just have an average person. It sort of adds to the idea that anyone could be a villain. And that’s pretty frightening.

Key Point:

- Complicate your villains. They’re not just Evil McEvilpants. 

That’s it for now, but like anything else in writing, antagonists have a lot of possibility and exceptions. But that was your basic rundown on the things to consider when making a complicated antagonist. 

~Penemue