is that new beck album out

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beck - dear life
new album “colors” out october 13

I don’t know if you guys heard, but it appears the Bull Moose messed up and posted the preorders for the new Beck album. They’ve since taken it down, but these screenshots show that the albums called Colors and is going to be out on October 13th. Looks like theres going to be a pretty wild deluxe edition too.

We need to put value on and invest in real music again. We need to "respect" TRUE "artistry."

Another Grammys has come and gone.

And this year all anyone seems to be talking about is Beck winning ‘Album of the Year.’

The Beyonce fans of the world lost their chill and Kanye ran up onstage in “protest.” …Leave it to Kanye to “pull a Kanye.”

At first, I thought, 'Oh Lord, here we go again.’ But, he turned around and ran off the stage laughing. So, I thought, 'OK, he was making a joke.' 

…Lame joke, but a joke none-the-less.

And then, I woke up the next morning:

HE WASN’T JOKING?!?!

HE ACTUALLY MEANT TO RUN UP ONSTAGE…AGAIN?!?!

Then, I went online and saw tweet after tweet and blog after blog saying: “Beyonce was robbed!” “Beyonce sold millions of copies.” “Beyonce is well-known.” “Beyonce is music royalty.” “She deserved it.”

Alright, this needs to stop. 

Sit down, Kanye and lemming stans and let me educate you.

“Respect Artistry?”

Let’s be real…Michelangelo is art. Warhol is art.

To give a modern music example, what Sia does with her songs and music videos…is art.

Beyonce’s album is a dance-and-party-in-the-club album. And that’s OK. We need songs in life to rock out to and have fun with!

But, just because something sells well and is mainstream, doesn’t mean it’s better or deserves to win.

The Grammys are supposed to be about quality. 

It’s not a popularity contest.

I thought quite a few people nominated and not nominated, including Beck, deserved 'Album of the Year,’ not Beyonce. 

But, since it was Beck who won and many people seem to think he didn’t deserve to win, let’s just look at the facts concerning Beyonce and Beck’s albums.

I’ve always been under the impression that the best and truly deserving artists are the ones who tell honest stories through their music, play their own instruments, and write their own songs.

So let’s check it out…

Beyonce:

Beck:

Beck wrote AND composed ALL of his songs.

Beyonce had as many as 8 other writers on a song at once and 6 producers on a song at once helping compose her music.

Also, Beck knows how to play more than a dozen instruments, including guitar, keyboards, bass, drums, harmonica, percussion, sitar, banjo, slide guitar, twelve-string guitar, glockenspiel, vocoder, kalimba, and melodica. Beyonce, as far as I know, doesn’t play any.

Now, let’s explore the popularity of, the themes, and the visual aspects to their albums…

Beyonce:

Beyonce is more popular and mainstream than Beck. Does that automatically make her better? No. It just means that more people are willing to let radio stations and the media dictate what they listen to, what is good, and who is popular.

In my opinion, the leading reason that this Beyonce album was as big as it was was because it was a surprise. She dropped it without telling anyone, social media blew up, and it was the talk of every entertainment news site. People flocked to buy it in its first hours. It was a thrill. An excitement. An experience. Beyonce fans bought into her and her team’s marketing tactic. She didn’t want to announce it, have time pass, and people’s interest wane before it even came out.

Lyrically and thematically…

In Beyonce’s self titled album, the majority of songs discuss her sex life with Jay-Z. (“Drunk in Love,” “Partition,” “Blow,” and “Rocket”) So creative and innovative. Songs about sex. That’s never been done before…

Two of the songs discuss a kind of trouble in paradise for her and Jay-Z, with implications of cheating and a husband straying (“Jealous” and “Mine”). Which doesn’t match up consistently with all the other songs where she talks about her wild, monogamous sex life and happy marriage. These songs disturb the flow of the album. Also, here is an excerpt of the lyrics from the song “Jealous.”

I’m in my penthouse half naked, I cooked this meal for you naked, So where the hell you at?

So thoughtful and deep…

One song (“Pretty Hurts”) talks about how society’s idea of perfection is damaging, which would have sent a really great message except for the fact that Beyonce is the one singing about it. This is the same woman who photoshopped her Instagram photo to give herself an unrealistic and unhealthy thigh gap…Great role model. She has a bangin’ body! Why is she photoshopping herself?!

Another song called “Flawless” is meant to be an empowerment anthem, but just comes off as a hollow attempt at feminism and is filled with themes of materialism and narcissism. Feminism is about helping those who are oppressed and lifting up other women, not talking about how much better you are than everyone else in your song lyrics.

In her song, “Haunted” she’s talks about how people are working hard in 9 to 5 jobs just to survive, and how bored she is in big record label meetings. Life as a famous, multi-million dollar, recording artist must be so hard… 

And don’t even get me started on the disturbing section in the song “Rocket” where she calls Jay-Z “daddy,” or Beyonce and Jay-Z referencing and laughing at the idea of Ike and Tina Turner in “Drunk in Love.” Because domestic abuse is so funny…

Visually…

Beyonce’s music videos have become boring and overrated. She’s always wearing skin tight or skimpy outfits, like bikinis or leotards or lingerie. She’s always glaring sexily into the camera while gyrating about with fans blowing on her or her hair dripping wet. It’s just so cliched and overdone.

Beck:

Beck’s only mainstream hit was the 1994 classic 'Loser.’ But, he has still stayed fairly popular among the underground and indie set for the past 20 years. This newest album, 'Morning Phase,’ has sold over 300,000 copies.

Many people were saying: “Who is Beck?” “Who is this nobody who beat Beyonce?”

Even 'Who Is Beck’ was trending on Twitter for several hours.  I thought it was just a joke because many older people were making jokes that the kids today wouldn’t know who Paul McCartney, AC/DC, and LL Cool J were. But, some people were actually serious! To which I say, how can you not know who Beck is? Yes, maybe you’ve never listened to his music before. But, to never have even heard his name spoken as part of the music industry on the radio or through entertainment news media? You have to be either 11 or completely living in your own little watered down, pop-centric, auto-tuned, mainstream radio world.

Not only this, but if you don’t even know who he is or listen to his music, then how can you criticize him or say Beyonce deserved to win?

Lyrically and thematically…

Beck’s album Morning Phase has hypnotic vocals and is so sonically cohesive. The songs of the album flow one into another forming a singular, long journey. It immerses the listener into a place where Beck questions how you live in this world when the world is so messed up. The songs wallow in a deep melancholy and delve into ideas of love, beauty, and resolve, the solutions to the problems we face.

Beck’s songs are introspective and the album starts and ends full-circle with the songs 'Morning’ and 'Waking Light,’ using the metaphor of a dawning morning to represent the new day, to represent reflection on the past and how to process it, to represent one’s questioning of the stage of life you are in.  It is deeply personal, yet written in a way that is completely universal and relatable.

Visually…

Beck’s music videos always have a simple, quiet, natural feel to them. They’re metaphorical and thoughtful. No flashing lights. No choreographed dancing. No big budgets. Just a camera and a walk through nature.

So where does this leave us?

I’m not a snobby, music hipster who doesn’t listen to mainstream music. 

I also have nothing against Beyonce as a person. As you can see, I only constructively criticized and analyzed her current work. (i.e. lyrics, songs meanings, music video creative choices…etc.) I’m sure she’s very nice, although I don’t know her personally, nor do I know any celebrities, so I cannot speak for anyone’s character. 

I loved her earlier Dangerously in Love and Destiny’s Child eras. Her song Blue from her self-entitled album is very beautiful and I thought her Grammy performance of the old-school, gospel song, 'Take My Hand Precious Lord,“ was simple and stunning. Plus, Beyonce has great songs to jam to in the car or when you’re out dancing with friends. You can’t tell me you’ve never rocked out to Single Ladies while driving to work or doing laundry.

BUT, we need to be conscious of music that doesn’t get the recognition it deserves. Even if you’ve never heard of an artist or if you don’t personally like their music, that doesn’t mean that they didn’t create a beautiful piece of art.

So many people are blinded by their idolization of celebrities that they would follow them no matter what they do. Even if that means following them off of a cliff. (Did you know some Beyonce fans were sending death threats to Beck and starting petitions to strip him of his Grammy?! Crazy…) As a fan of something, you don’t have to ignorantly love everything that your favorite music artist says or sings. There are plenty of singers and musicians who create music that I love, but have things about them that I don’t like or particular songs I don’t enjoy. (There are things about Beck and songs of his that I don’t like.)

AND THAT’S OK.

Part of being a receptive and conscious fan is being able to form your own opinion about things and criticize the things you love. If anything, I would say that those who are the best and most passionate fans have constructive criticism for their favorite shows, movies, and music.

Beyonce can’t be the winning music artist every single year. The mainstream public needs to learn to respect other artists and the work that they do.

In this era of Spotify not putting value on music as art and the public downloading, or even illegally stealing, single songs without experiencing full albums, we all need to learn to appreciate things that aren’t spoon-fed to us by corporate, music industry, marketing teams and the entertainment media. We need to support un-manufactured, true, music artists who tell their stories honestly, write their own music, and have real talent, without the likes of auto-tune.

We need to put value on and invest in real music again. We need to "respect” TRUE “artistry.”

Lilo Fic Rec

Hey hey so here’s a little fic rec for anyone who enjoys lilo as much as I do :)

Warning for some BDSM elements in a few of these

This Would Be It- Liam works in a cemetery and Louis is everything he wants, everything he once had, and everything he never dreamed of. (Saying anything else might ruin it.)

If You Leave-Four times, Louis makes Liam a promise. Liam wishes he would have promised back.

Soul-Louis is the medical android tasked with taking care of Liam in a world after nuclear war.

Better With You- Single parent and solo artist Liam Payne hires Louis Tomlinson to be a full time nanny to his four year old son Sammy. Although the two men don’t quite click from the start it’s love at first sight between Sammy and Louis. Eventually Louis and Liam warm up to each other and get on like a house on fire, in fact the two become a little too fond of each other.

Truly, Madly, Crazy, Deeply-In which Liam and Louis wake up married after Zayn’s bachelor party in Las Vegas.

Miss Missing You-Louis wakes up after an accident with a year of memories gone and something not quite right about his relationship with Liam.

A Place in the Sun-Louis is looking forward to spending the whole summer with Harry and his friends, working at a summer camp, drinking and being generally stupid. But there’s a new counselor who’s actually read the rulebook, and he’s going to ruin everything.

Build a Nest for Us to Sleep In-“It’ll be fun,” Louis tells Liam quietly. If it was anyone else’s break-up, Louis would know exactly what to do, what balance of fondness and foolishness he’d need to give, but he’s totally lost with Liam. Louis has no idea what he might need, what could make him feel better, so in the end he gives Liam the only thing he has: “We can order take away and play videogames and fuck about for a few days. I’ll get Harry to bring us groceries, we won’t even need to leave the house. Come on, Liam, come live with me.”

Smile Again-Recently dumped Louis sets his kitchen on fire on Christmas Eve. Fireman Liam makes the mistake of inviting him home for Christmas. Chaos and feelings ensue.

Easy as All That (Go Around a Time or Two)-The one where Liam and Louis only kiss when they’re on nights out, when it’s secret, when there’s no one around to see them. If no one knows you’re having a sexuality crisis, that means it isn’t happening, right?

Worth the Wait-“Leave it to you, Liam, to not only be the least likely person to ever pull in a hooker, but he winds up being a bloke that you move in with.” He’s cackling wildly now and Liam’s hand nearly slips off the wheel as Niall hits him repeatedly. Liam doesn’t need to see to know Niall’s laughing so hard he’s got tears coming from his eyes and his cheeks are most likely a bright red flush. “Liam Payne: making even a shady encounter with a hooker into a respectable situation.”

Under Me You, So Quite New-Liam knows what Louis needs, even when Louis doesn’t.

The New Posh and Becks-2016 is a big year for solo artist Liam Payne. After his amazing experience on X Factor, releasing his own album and touring with Little Mix seems like the height of success. Then he meets Arsenal midfielder Louis Tomlinson at a charity event, and suddenly everything

Restart The Heart You Gave Me-I—” Louis starts, stopping himself abruptly and taking an extended pause before rushing out, “I miss you,” so fast that Liam almost, almost doesn’t catch it. He hears Louis’ sharp intake of breath on the other end and thinks that maybe Louis is just as surprised by his admission as he is. Okay.

With the Hope That You Would Tame Me-Once, on a dull night off, Liam tries asking Google on a whim. He stares at the blinking cursor in the search bar for a while, trying to figure out how to phrase it, because something tells him “why does my mate like it when I hit him” won’t bring up a lot of helpful results.

Come a Little Closer-Liam finds Louis’ porn.

If it’s Love, Hold me Tight-Relationships are complicated, especially if the other person is carefully avoiding talking about it in any serious way; or, the one where Louis is afraid of commitment and makes a right mess of things because of it.

A Love That’s There for Others Too-When Liam filmed Louis during a strictly one-time-only stoned hook-up, he never expected it to turn their lives upside down.

Level Up-I’ve been having some weird—feelings,“ Liam says, "recently.” “What, like, in your pants?” Louis demands. He’s expecting Liam to scowl and correct him and start talking sensibly, but instead Liam’s whole face goes a hot, mortified red. Louis stares. “You’re taking the piss,” he says, incredulous. “Aren’t you?”

These Streets are Yours-The night Louis slept with Liam, Louis was half-convinced that just for once, things were going to go his way.

Look at the Stars, Look How They Shine For You-In the end, Liam says what he always says, what he’ll always say to Louis when he’s like this. “You can, you know,” Liam says quietly. “Be with me, that is.” He feels Louis go tense because Liam’s never had the talk with Louis like he’s had with himself but he somehow thinks Louis knows. They haven’t been together like this for so long Liam half-expects Louis to question him and the fact that he doesn’t makes Liam think Louis wants him just as much, even if it’s just for tonight.

Thought it Would Be Safest-And for years after that, all throughout school, Liam comes home with Louis’ name in the corner of his books and the thin skin of his inner elbows and the back of his shirt even though they’re never in the same class. (Liam and Louis grow up together)

Needing is One Thing, Getting Is Another- It’s hard not to stare at your wrist when there is a small, futuristic, piece of metal imbedded in the skin there, like something out of a science fiction novel. Louis’ TiMER has never changed: four sections of dashes blinking the seconds away, completely blank until his soulmate gets their TiMER too.

Paris Blue- Liam and Harry visit Paris. Louis is a prostitute, except for when he isn’t.

Just Remember Who I am in the Morning-After a car accident Louis is left with a condition that causes him to wake up at random points in his life with no recollection of any memories he’s made past the age of nineteen. He has no clue who Liam is or the fact that they’re married and Liam is forced to make Louis fall in love with him, over and over again.

April Fools-Now, staring down at the platinum band on his own left hand (“only the best for you, Liam,” Louis had said, smirking as he slid the ring on Liam’s finger), Liam wasn’t so sure any of this was the best idea for an April Fool’s prank. But both of them knew he would go along with it. Liam always did.

If I Could Reach The Stars, Id Give Them All To You- Louis goes to bed 13 and miserable. He wakes up 17 years later on top of the world. (13 going on 30 au)

A Secret Chord- On a whim, Louis and Liam decide to turn a mutual love of their reckless adventures, wild mischief, and bulletproof friendship into pop music and songs they can be proud of. It’s the start of a partnership that shouldn’t actually work, but really really does. Or, Liam and Louis make memories at midnight.

Ink My Skin With Your Name-Liam knows the moment he wakes up that it’s not Louis laying beside him. It’s Louis’ body and Louis’ voice slowly starting to freak out. That was his second hint that Louis was gone, the first was that he hadn’t woken up with a small weight on his chest and lips pressed to his jaw.

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beck - up all night
from upcoming album “colors”, out october 13th

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The Chemical Brothers (Ft. Beck) - Wide Open

Taken from the new album ‘Born In The Echoes’ out now, video direction by Dom & Nic.

Colors - Beck [MUSIC REVIEW]

This year was supposed to be great for music. New Primus, new Mastodon, new Queens of the Stone Age. The sheer number of great bands putting out new material was staggering. It’s too bad that so many of these albums have been underwhelming. Some of them have even been piles of shit covered in vomit. (I’m looking at you, Queens.) So, I desperately needed Beck’s latest release to be good.

Thank the gods it is.

Now, I saw an article where he described the songs on Colors as “complex pop” …but I feel that’s a bit of a stretch. Sure, the lyrics are thoughtful, the instrumentals are intricate, and the grooves are infectious, but there is little presented here that’s challenging or goes beyond the expectations of the listener. This album, in no way, defies the logic of all sex laws. But I’m actually okay with it. The album aims to please and it does just that - it’s exactly what I needed to hear.

It’s pretty fucking good.

Racism, Sexism, the Grammy's and Beyoncé

There are no more excuses; and this is nothing new. You can say Beck released an amazing album. You can even say the Grammy’s are irrelevant in regard to the pulse of music today. You might be right. But, the Grammy’s are still largely watched and discussed and that makes them relevant and political in our pop-culture obsessed contemporary world. We all choose to listen to whatever music we want on our own time, but it means something to see that music get celebrated in such a major way. As Azealia Banks said, it shows all people out there watching what/who is worthy of praise and what/who falls short. These decisions almost always represent and uphold “white supremacist capitalist [hetero]patriarchy” - a phrase bell hooks began using many years ago and remains equally relevant now.

In an industry run mainly by rich, white men, Beyoncé breaks all the rules. Even before coming out explicitly with her feminist consciousness, she was surrounding herself with women — and even more notably, other black women and women of color — in spaces where these same women were underrepresented. From dancers, band members, and business associates, Beyoncé has long celebrated powerful women of color and taken control of her own career in ways that hardly any other black female artist has been able to do while also maintaining a similar level of superstar success. And this is why she scares the Grammy’s. And that is exactly why they did not award her Album of the Year at this year’s Grammy’s. It was one of the biggest snubs of all time, but it also comes off as the Grammy Awards punishing Beyoncé for breaking all those tried-and-true rules of white supremacist capitalist heteropatriarchy. All this exposition is to say, in the clearest way possible:  Beyoncé’s snub for Album of the Year this year for BEYONCÉ is some serious racist and sexist bullshit.

Beyoncé broke every rule about what she could and was supposed to release with BEYONCÉ. She created an album with 14 songs and 17 videos in secret and gave it to the world with no press tour, endless teaser singles, or any fanfare at all. This alone is unheard of. The fact that she is a black woman doing things that would prove difficult even for white men in the music industry is truly remarkable. That alone is enough reason to award BEYONCÉ Album of the Year. Further, the album is sonically, lyrically, visually, and politically daring. Aside from 2 (possibly 3) more traditionally commercial songs, the album consisted of sounds and vocals we have never heard from Beyoncé — or anyone else for that matter — before. It drew on music and themes of the past and pushed them to places we didn’t know they could go. That’s what great art does. And Beyoncé’s spectacular art literally stopped the world. As she said on Nicki Minaj’s “Feeling Myself”: “Changed the game when that digital dropped / Know where you was when that digital popped / I stopped the world / Male or female it makes no difference / I stopped the world / World stop…Carry on.”

Unfortunately, to the Grammy’s it looks like it does make a difference. They were never going to give Beyoncé their most coveted award for an album that criticized and vilified the music industry in general (“Ghost,” “Haunted”); proclaimed unequivocal black feminism (“***Flawless”); celebrated unabashed and unashamed powerful female sexuality (“Rocket,”Blow”); exposed the racialized side of poverty in the U.S. (“No Angel”); and critiqued the audience’s own objectification of the black female body (“Partition,” “Jealous”), among many, many other things. People often tell me that when teaching “Politicizing Beyoncé” I’m reaching too far or making something out of nothing - they insist Beyoncé isn’t political. On the other hand, the Grammy’s find her album too political to award. Interesting dichotomy, but one that most black women in the U.S. are all too familiar with.

And Beck released a perfectly fine album. But at the end of the day, that is all Morning Phase was. Fine. And Beck is a white man, so that means his perfectly fine music gets elevated to savior status. That’s not to say Beck hasn’t released great music in the past - he has. But despite being lauded by pretentious music critics everywhere, Beck’s Morning Phase was kind of a mid-tempo snooze. Beyoncé makes music and historic moments that stop the world; and Beck makes music that might very well put the world to sleep.

It’s 2015, but we still live in a world where white men’s art and opinions are prized and celebrated above all else. Even when they prove quite boring. Even when Beyoncé’s name and performance was used to entice the entire viewing public into sitting through an overly tedious, nearly 3.5 hour broadcast with only a tiny handful of worthwhile performances and Prince’s exquisite cameo (“Like books and black lives, albums still matter”). In the history of the Grammy awards only 3 black women have been awarded Album of the Year (Natalie Cole, Whitney Houston, and Lauryn Hill), and that number should have jumped to 4 this year. But it didn’t - because the Grammy’s pretend to honor diversity but refuse to value black women’s art and lives in the most meaningful ways. Beyoncé didn’t need the Album of the Year Grammy; but she deserved it for releasing brave political music/videos that could not have come from any other artist. The fact that she doesn’t have it, despite having 20 other Grammy’s, tells us more about America than we would perhaps like to know: racism and sexism haven’t gone anywhere. They just work differently. They also still work the same.

Racism, Sexism, the Grammy's & Beyoncé

There are no more excuses; and this is nothing new. You can say Beck released an amazing album. You can even say the Grammy’s are irrelevant in regard to the pulse of music today. You might be right. But, the Grammy’s are still largely watched and discussed and that makes them relevant and political in our pop-culture obsessed contemporary world. We all choose to listen to whatever music we want on our own time, but it means something to see that music get celebrated in such a major way. As Azealia Banks said, it shows all people out there watching what/who is worthy of praise and what/who falls short. These decisions almost always represent and uphold “white supremacist capitalist [hetero]patriarchy” - a phrase bell hooks began using many years ago and remains equally relevant now.

In an industry run mainly by rich, white men, Beyoncé breaks all the rules. Even before coming out explicitly with her feminist consciousness, she was surrounding herself with women — and even more notably, other black women and women of color — in spaces where these same women were underrepresented. From dancers, band members, and business associates, Beyoncé has long celebrated powerful women of color and taken control of her own career in ways that hardly any other black female artist has been able to do while also maintaining a similar level of superstar success. And this is why she scares the Grammy’s. And that is exactly why they did not award her Album of the Year at this year’s Grammy’s. It was one of the biggest snubs of all time, but it also comes off as the Grammy Awards punishing Beyoncé for breaking all those tried-and-true rules of white supremacist capitalist heteropatriarchy. All this exposition is to say, in the clearest way possible:  Beyoncé’s snub for Album of the Year this year for BEYONCÉ is some serious racist and sexist bullshit.

Beyoncé broke every rule about what she could and was supposed to release with BEYONCÉ. She created an album with 14 songs and 17 videos in secret and gave it to the world with no press tour, endless teaser singles, or any fanfare at all. This alone is unheard of. The fact that she is a black woman doing things that would prove difficult even for white men in the music industry is truly remarkable. That alone is enough reason to award BEYONCÉ Album of the Year. Further, the album is sonically, lyrically, visually, and politically daring. Aside from 2 (possibly 3) more traditionally commercial songs, the album consisted of sounds and vocals we have never heard from Beyoncé — or anyone else for that matter — before. It drew on music and themes of the past and pushed them to places we didn’t know they could go. That’s what great art does. And Beyoncé’s spectacular art literally stopped the world. As she said on Nicki Minaj’s “Feeling Myself”: “Changed the game when that digital dropped / Know where you was when that digital popped / I stopped the world / Male or female it makes no difference / I stopped the world / World stop…Carry on.”

Unfortunately, to the Grammy’s it looks like it does make a difference. They were never going to give Beyoncé their most coveted award for an album that criticized and vilified the music industry in general (“Ghost,” “Haunted”); proclaimed unequivocal black feminism (“***Flawless”); celebrated unabashed and unashamed powerful female sexuality (“Rocket,”Blow”); exposed the racialized side of poverty in the U.S. (“No Angel”); and critiqued the audience’s own objectification of the black female body (“Partition,” “Jealous”), among many, many other things. People often tell me that when teaching “Politicizing Beyoncé” I’m reaching too far or making something out of nothing - they insist Beyoncé isn’t political. On the other hand, the Grammy’s find her album too political to award. Interesting dichotomy, but one that most black women in the U.S. are all too familiar with.

And Beck released a perfectly fine album. But at the end of the day, that is all Morning Phase was. Fine. And Beck is a white man, so that means his perfectly fine music gets elevated to savior status. That’s not to say Beck hasn’t released great music in the past - he has. But despite being lauded by pretentious music critics everywhere, Beck’s Morning Phase was kind of a mid-tempo snooze. Beyoncé makes music and historic moments that stop the world; and Beck makes music that might very well put the world to sleep.

It’s 2015, but we still live in a world where white men’s art and opinions are prized and celebrated above all else. Even when they prove quite boring. Even when Beyoncé’s name and performance was used to entice the entire viewing public into sitting through an overly tedious, nearly 3.5 hour broadcast with only a tiny handful of worthwhile performances and Prince’s exquisite cameo (“Like books and black lives, albums still matter”). In the history of the Grammy awards only 3 black women have been awarded Album of the Year (Natalie Cole, Whitney Houston, and Lauryn Hill), and that number should have jumped to 4 this year. But it didn’t - because the Grammy’s pretend to honor diversity but refuse to value black women’s art and lives in the most meaningful ways. Beyoncé didn’t need the Album of the Year Grammy; but she deserved it for releasing brave political music/videos that could not have come from any other artist. The fact that she doesn’t have it, despite having 20 other Grammy’s, tells us more about America than we would perhaps like to know: racism and sexism haven’t gone anywhere. They just work differently. They also still work the same.

PARAMORE, ED SHEERAN, BEYONCE AMONG GRAMMY NOMINEES

2015 Grammy nominations are finally up, and Paramore snagged a nomination for Best Rock Song with their single “Ain’t it Fun.” Ed Sheeran's got a nod for Best Pop Vocal Album. Beyoncé is stealing the show, though, with nominations for Best Urban Contemporary Album, Best Music Film, Best R&B Performance, and Best R&B Song. Bey now holds the record for most Grammy nominations, beating out Dolly Parton, but, let’s face it, no one’s surprised. Beyoncé is queen. Find a full list of nominees below. 

Keep reading

Ken Tucker reviews Jenny Lewis’ new album, Voyager : 

“Lewis’ strength as a singer is that she’s a powerful vocalist who rarely shows off her chops—like the once and future actress she is, she knows how to modulate the emotions she puts out there, holding back to achieve some of her best effects. This is a quality showcased on a song produced by Beck called “Just One of the Guys.” The song is getting some attention for its video, which features Lewis singing alongside gal pals including Anne Hathaway and Kristen Stewart, but you don’t need the visuals to lock into the hypnotic allure of the melody.”

la-sirena-morena replied to your post:…Beck is still making music?

When Bey’s album dropped the WHOLE WORLD lost its shit. Beck drops an album and no one fucking notices yet he gets album of the year?

Like, Beyonce dropped an entire visual goddamn album in our laps out of nowhere, and for weeks people were not only talking about just the songs alone but all articles popped up wondering “will visual albums be the new thing? will releasing without prior promotion be the new thing? Did Beyonce change the game? Is this the new trend?” How can something that significant in pop culture not be considered album of the year? Riddle me that one.