is that corey in the back

46 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In YA Literature

1. “You could rattle the stars. You could do anything, if you only dared. And deep down, you know it too, and that’s what scares you the most.”
—Sarah J. Maas, Throne of Glass

2. “Because sometimes chance and circumstance can seem like the most appalling injustice, but we just have to adapt. That’s all we can do.”
—Gavin Extence, The Universe Versus Alex Woods

3. “I can’t seem to be a pessimist long enough to overlook the possibility of things being overwhelmingly good.”
—John Corey Whaley, Where Things Come Back

4. “Books are my friends, my companions. They make me laugh and cry and find meaning in life.”
―Christopher Paolini, Eragon

5. “Because Margo knows the secret of leaving, the secret I have only just now learned; leaving feels good and pure only when you leave something important, something that mattered to you. Pulling life out by the roots. But you can’t do that until your life has grown roots.”
—John Green, Paper Towns

6. “Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living, and, above all those who live without love.”
―J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

7. “I’m done with those; regrets are an excuse for people who have failed.”
—Ned Vizzini, It’s Kind of a Funny Story

8. “Becoming fearless isn’t the point. That’s impossible. It’s learning how to control your fear, and how to be free from it.”
—Veronica Roth, Divergent

9. “The moon is a loyal companion. It never leaves. It’s always there, watching, steadfast, knowing us in our light and dark moments, changing forever just as we do. Every day it’s a different version of itself. Sometimes weak and wan, sometimes strong and full of light. The moon understands what it means to be human. Uncertain. Alone. Cratered by imperfections.”
—Tahereh Mafi, Shatter Me

10. “Eleanor was right. She never looked nice. She looked like art, and art wasn’t supposed to look nice; it was supposed to make you feel something.”
—Rainbow Rowell, Eleanor & Park

11. “Don’t be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don’t have to live forever, you just have to live.”
—Natalie Babbit, Tuck Everlasting

12. “Just because we’ve been … dealt a certain hand … it doesn’t mean that we can’t choose to rise above — to conquer the boundaries of a destiny that none of us wanted.”
—Stephenie Meyer, Twilight

13. “Some walks you have to take alone.”
—Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

14. “That’s the thing about pain. It demands to be felt.”
—John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

15. “We believe in the wrong things. That’s what frustrates me the most. Not the lack of belief, but the belief in the wrong things. You want meaning? Well, the meanings are out there. We’re just so damn good at reading them wrong.”
—Rachel Cohn, Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares

16. “Why would you be given wings if you weren’t meant to fly?”
—Leslye Walton, The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender

17. “Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing.”
—Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

18. “It’s just that…I just think that some things are meant to be broken. Imperfect. Chaotic. It’s the universe’s way of providing contrast, you know? There have to be a few holes in the road. It’s how life is.”
—Sarah Dessen, The Truth About Forever

19. “The universe is bigger than anything that can fit into your mind.”
—Ava Dellaira, Love Letters to the Dead

20. “I try to think about how it all works. At school dances, I sit in the background, and I tap my toe, and I wonder how many couples will dance to ‘their song.’ In the hallways, I see the girls wearing the guys’ jackets, and I think about the idea of property. And I wonder if anyone is really happy. I hope they are. I really hope they are.”
—Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

21. “Things were rough all over but it was better that way. That way, you could tell the other guy was human too.”
—S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders

22. “What if evil doesn’t really exist? What if evil is something dreamed up by man, and there is nothing to struggle against except our own limitations? The constant battle between our will, our desires, and our choices?”
—Libba Bray, Rebel Angels

23. “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”
—J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

24. “It’s like the people who believe they’ll be happy if they go and live somewhere else, but who learn it doesn’t work that way. Wherever you go, you take yourself with you. If you see what I mean.”
—Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book

25. “I can tell you that the end of a life is the sum of the love that was lived in it, that whatever you think you have sworn, being here at the end of Jem’s life is not what is important. It was being here for every other moment.”
—Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Princess

26. “Life, with its rules, its obligations, and its freedoms, is like a sonnet: You’re given the form, but you have to write the sonnet yourself.”
—Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle In Time

27. “Maybe who we are isn’t so much about what we do, but rather what we’re capable of when we least expect it”
—Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper

28. “People never really died. They only went on to a better place, to wait a while for their loved ones to join them. And then once more they went back to the world, in the same way they had arrived the first time around.”
―V.C. Andrews, Flowers in the Attic

29. “Goodbye, I say, goodbye, as I disappear little by little into the middle of the middle of my own spectacular now.”
—Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now

30. “But if I’m it, the last of my kind, the last page of human history, like hell I’m going to let the story end this way…Because if I am the last one, then I am humanity. And if this is humanity’s last war, then I am the battlefield.”
—Rick Yancey, The 5th Wave

31. “The words were on their way, and when they arrived, she would hold them in her hands like clouds, and she would ring them out like the rain.”
—Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

32. “Child, no one is ever ready for anything. I would never doom you to that. What sort of adventureless life would that be?”
—Alethea Kontis, Enchanted

33. “And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”
—John Steinbeck, East of Eden

34. “Maybe some people are just meant to be in the same story.”
―Jandy Nelson, I’ll Give You the Sun

35. “If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s this: We all want everything to be okay. We don’t even wish so much for fantastic or marvelous or outstanding. We will happily settle for okay, because most of the time, okay is enough.”
—David Levithan, Every Day

36. “Doubt everything at least once. What you decide to keep, you’ll be able to be confident of. And what you decide to ditch, you will replace with what your instincts tell you is true.”
―Amy Plum, After the End

37. “Just as a river by night shines with the reflected light of the moon, so too do you shine with the light of your family, your people, and your God. So you are never far from home, never alone, wherever you go.”
—Karen Cushman, Catherine Called Birdy

38. “You spend your whole life stuck in the labyrinth, thinking about how you’ll escape it one day, and how awesome it will be, and imagining that future keeps you going, but you never do it. You just use the future to escape the present.”
—John Green, Looking for Alaska

39. “There’s no shame in fear, my father told me, what matters is how we face it.”
—George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings

40. “I know that the whole point—the only point—is to find the things that matter, and hold on to them, and fight for them, and refuse to let them go.”
—Lauren Oliver, Delirium

41. “We feel cold, but we don’t mind it, because we will not come to harm. And if we wrapped up against the cold, we wouldn’t feel other things, like the bright tingle of the stars, or the music of the aurora, or best of all the silky feeling of moonlight on our skin. It’s worth being cold for that.”
—Philip Pullman, The Golden Compass

42. “It’s a lot easier to be lost than found. It’s the reason we’re always searching and rarely discovered—so many locks not enough keys.”
―Sarah Dessen, Lock and Key

43. “On that cold night in January it all slipped into place for me and she became my everything and my everyone. My music, my sun, my words, my logic, my confusion, my flaw.”
—Julie Murphy, Side Effects May Vary

44. “Hope? Hope can be a powerful force. Maybe there’s no actual magic in it, but when you know what you hope for most and hold it like a light within you, you can make things happen, almost like magic.”
—Laini Taylor, Daughter of Smoke and Bone

45. “[She] had always suffered from a vague restlessness, a longing for adventure that she told herself severely was the result of reading too many novels when she was a small child.”
—Robin McKinley, The Blue Sword

46. “Youth cannot know how age thinks and feels, but old men are guilty if they forget what it was to be young.”
—J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 

[TW 6B SPOILERS] According to someone who has the script for 6x20:

- Derek comes back because one of the Hales die.
- There’s a lot of Lydia, Stiles, Scott and Derek screentime.
- Stiles and Derek are in a scene with Scott. (I’m not sure if they’re in any others.)
- Stydia will be endgame. There is no rain kiss but they have boyfriend/girlfriend banter.
- Jackson comes back. - Mason and Corey are endgame.
- Derek gets a happy ending.
- There’s a flash forward and Scott is successful and married in it but they don’t say who he’s married to.
- Theo helps Liam’s pack, hence all the old characters coming back for one final battle.
- There will be no Kira, unfortunately.
- Episode is Hale centric.
- Melissa and Chris are also endgame.
- Parrish gets a final scene with the sheriff but his story really isn’t wrapped up, or something.
- There’s a flash forward.
- The ending is epic.

(All from TwSpoilers on Twitter.)

anonymous asked:

Do you know what all of the victims did on their last day alive?

I know some of their last moments. It seems a lot of parents spoke about their final moments with their children in interviews. (Some of the ones I listed are just last remembered activities, not what they did the day before sorry.)

  • Rachel Scott 
    • Rachel’s last morning by now is very well known. Rachel and her brother had gotten into an argument because they were running late to school. He had rudely slammed the door in her face and unknowingly that was his last interaction with her. 
  • Daniel Rohrbough 
    • I don’t know Daniel’s last day, but one thing that comes to mind was he held the door open for the people behind him as he fled the school.
  • Dave Sanders
    • Dave Sanders moments are also very well known. His last moments are what made him known as a hero. Instead of protecting himself and hiding, he alerted the students in the cafeteria confirming active shooters in the school. It’s safe to say he saved many peoples lives that day.
  • Kyle Velasquez 
    • Kyle was driven to school everyday by his mother.  Kyle’s last words to her were simply “Goodbye. I love you, mom.”
  • Matthew Kechter 
    • “When I heard he was one of the ones from the library, it only made sense. He was always in the library studying. He always put academics first. He had straight A’s but he would never brag about it. I kinda looked up to him because of it. He was never in a bad mood, he was consistenly happy.” - Greg Barnes 
    • Matt was sitting with Isaiah and Craig Scott that day in the library.
  • Isaiah Shoels
    • It was a typical morning for Isaiah too. He had run out of the house and left his bed unmade. 
  • Lauren Townsend
    • The night before, her mother and her father had attended a Rockies game and got home around 9:30. When they got back, Lauren was slightly upset at them for coming back so late even though she knew they would be gone. She was disappointed because she wanted to snuggle and the game interrupted their ‘snuggle time.’ Her mother sat down with her for a few minutes, but Lauren had some work left to do and went off to bed. She said goodnight and told her mom they’d snuggle tomorrow. Her mom promised to put in extra time to snuggle. She never came home.
  • John Tomlin
    • In John’s final moments, it was an everyday routine. He left his bible open on the dash of his beloved truck and was studying at the library on the day of the massacre like everyday.
  • Daniel Mauser
    • Daniel too was in the library, a daily occurrence. But as he was approached by Eric, he pushed a chair out as a way to stand up to him. He was shot right after.
  • Corey DePooter 
    • Corey and his mother had always danced together in the kitchen growing up. His mom remembers him and his brother always being good dancers. The night before his death, him and his mom just so happened to share a last dance out of the blue. It definitely wasn’t an every night occurrence, so looking back it was really special for her.
  • Cassie Bernall
    • I’ll let her mom do the talking ;)
    • “April 20, 1999, started like any other school day in our house. At five forty-five Brad, my husband, left for work, and a little later I got up to wake the kids. Getting teenagers out of bed is always a small battle, but that Tuesday was especially difficult. Cassie had stayed up late the night before catching up on homework, and her books were all over the kitchen table. Her cat’s litter box needed attention, too, and we were running late with breakfast. I remember trying not to lecture her about all the things that needed doing before she left for school….
    • About seven-twenty Chris kissed me goodbye, or at least gave me his cheek, which is what it’s gone to lately (he’s fifteen) and clattered down the stairs and out of the house. Cassie stopped at the door to put on her shoes – her beloved black velvet Doc Martens, which she wore rain or shine, even with dresses – grabbed her backpack, and headed after her brother. As she left I leaned over the banister to say goodbye, like I always do: “Bye, Cass. I love you.” “Love you too, Mom,” she mumbled back. Then she was gone, through the back yard, over the fence, and across the soccer  field to the high school, which is only a hundred yards away. I dressed, made myself a cup of coffee, locked up, and drove off to work.” 
9

Favourite 80s Movies (Part 1/?);

The Goonies, The Outsiders, License To Drive, Heathers, Stand By Me, The Evil Dead, The Empire Strikes Back, The Lost Boys, Running On Empty. 

These are the 100 best young adult books, according to Time. How many of these have you read?

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  2. Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling
  3. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
  5. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  6. Holes by Louis Sachar
  7. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  8. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  9. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster
  10. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  11. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
  12. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  13. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
  14. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  15. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  16. Monster by Walter Dean Myers
  17. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  18. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 
  19. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
  20. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  21. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  by Mark Haddon
  22. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  23. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamilo
  24. Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  25. The Sword in the Stone by T.H. White
  26. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  27. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  28. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  29. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  30. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  31. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  32. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  33. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  34. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  35. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  36. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  37. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
  38. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
  39. Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
  40. A Series of Unfortunate Events (series) by Lemony Snicket  
  41. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  42. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
  43. Feed by M.T. Anderson
  44. The Alchemyst by Michael Scott
  45. The Princess Bride by William Goldman 
  46. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  47. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  48. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
  49. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
  50. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  51. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  52. Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  53. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  54. A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly
  55. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  56. The Hunger Games (series) by Suzanne Collins
  57. For Freedom by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  58. The Wall: Growing up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sis
  59. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
  60. Percy Jackson and the Olympians (series) by Rick Riordan
  61. The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury
  62. A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson
  63. Every Day by David Levithan
  64. Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley
  65. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  66. Blankets by Craig Thompson 
  67. Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  68. The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
  69. Dangerous Angels by Francesca Lia Block
  70. Frindle by Andrew Clements
  71. Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang
  72. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  73. City of the Beasts by Isabel Allende
  74. American Born Chinese by  Gene Luen Yang
  75. The Lost Conspiracy by Frances Hardinge
  76. Dogsbody by Diana Wynne Jones
  77. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
  78. Alabama Moon by Watt Key
  79. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
  80. The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
  81. Boy Proof by Cecil Castellucci
  82. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
  83. A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
  84. The Tiger Rising by Kate Dicamillo
  85. When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
  86. Saffy’s Angel by Hilary McKay
  87. The Grey King by Susan Cooper
  88. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien
  89. The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  90. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Steward
  91. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  92. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  93. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  94. Secret (series) by Pseudonymous Bosch
  95. The Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
  96. Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe
  97. Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher
  98. The Chronicles of Prydian (series) by Lloyd Alexander
  99. Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
  100. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

P.S. Want to make a little more progress on this list? You can get two free audiobooks here

3

‘We walked through the night and made it back to Castle Rock
a little past five o'clock on Sunday morning, the day before Labor Day.
We’d only been gone two days but somehow the town seemed different. Smaller.’

Stand by me | 1986 | dir: Rob Reiner | dop: Thomas Del Ruth

I would like to bring back the fact that Jack's name is misspelled as "Jack Kelley" on the Newsies Banner projection.

and has been that way for every run of the show.

some cute things i noticed about the pittsburgh penguins

so as many of you know, i went to the pit v njd game on april 6th, and it was my first hockey game so i legit wrote down the things i noticed them doing that i thought were cute.

under a read more because i have way too many feelings.

Keep reading

A year ago we rescued him and he was scared of everything. Cars, strangers, music, literally everything. Six months later he went through a stage where he would bite and rip everything apart and every morning at 3am he would run around the house barking waking everyone up and no one knew why. The place where we rescued him called to tell us that many of his sisters and brothers were recently returned because “they were too much to handle”. Another six months later he’s jumping into the tub to take a bath with a silly smile on his face full of love and kisses. What I’m trying to say is never give up on anyone or anything when you believe their/it’s worth it. I promise it’s worth it in the end.

18 Years Ago

Remember Them.
The Victims of the Columbine Massacre
(In order of age)

Steven Curnow, 14
Steven’s birthday was on the 28th of August 1984, and he was a freshman at Columbine High School when the massacre happened. He was fatally shot by Eric Harris in the shoulder and in the neck, while he was hiding under a table in the library, and passed away from the injuries shortly after. Steven was believed to have been a huge Star Wars fan, and he had also hoped to maybe have become a Navy pilot after he graduated and left school.

Daniel Rohrbough, 15
Daniel was born on the 2nd of March, 1984, and was in freshman year when he died in the massacre. He was shot by Eric Harris in the leg, but was killed by Dylan Klebold, from being shot once in the head and once in the stomach, while he was heading out of the cafeteria with his friends, who were both injured in the attack. He was supposedly a big fan of computer games, electronics and such. After Daniel passed, his family took the slab of stone he died on and kept it under a swing in their backyard to remember him by, and always have a piece of him with them.

Daniel Mauser, 15
Daniel’s birthday was the 25th of June, 1983 and was a sophomore when he passed. He was shot with a 9mm bullet in the nose by Eric Harris, and said bullet traveled through his neck and unfortunately killed him in the library. He was said to have loved a challenge and to push himself, and so he joined the debate team to battle his shyness, the cross country team to improve his psychical health and was said to have enjoyed to study the sciences.

Matthew (Matt) Ketcher, 16
Matt was born on February 19th, 1983, and was in his sophomore year of high school.
He was shot by Dylan Klebold with a bullet that entered his left shoulder, passed through his neck and lung and exited through his right arm. He passed in the library.
Matt managed to maintain a straight A average grade and was trying to make the starting squad as a lineman.

Kelly Fleming, 16
Kelly Ann Fleming was born on the 6th of January in the year 1983, and was in sophomore year at Columbine High when she passed away. She was sadly shot once in the lower back by Eric Harris and died shortly after while she was in the library. She was believed to have been very musical, and loved to write her own songs and write poetry.

John Tomlin, 16
On September 1st, 1983, John Tomlin was born, and woefully passed away on April 20th 1999 while he was in his sophomore year of high school. He was grazed in the chest by Eric Harris, and his head was shot three times by Dylan Klebold, before he perished in the library. He worked at a nursing home in Littleton to save up for a truck, and was said to have planned on entering the Army after graduation.

Kyle Velasquez, 16
Kyle was born on the 5th of May, 1983 and was in his sophomore year when he passed away. Kyle was unable to get under the tables as fast as everyone else, and therefore was unjustly shot by Dylan Klebold once in the back of his left shoulder and once in the head. He died in the library.
Kyle had a stroke a birth, which lead to later difficulties in life, but that didn’t stop him from enjoying spending time with his family, his cats, eating ice cream, watching sports games and riding his bicycle. He was a student at Columbine for only 3 months, and was thought to have been ‘just beginning to spread his wings.’

Cassie Bernall, 17
Cassie was born in 1981, on November 6th. She was a junior when she sadly died in the Columbine Massacre. Cassie was shot by Eric Harris once in the right side of her head, the same shot also hit one of her fingers. Eric mocked “Peek-a-boo,” before shooting her under table 19. She passed in the library. Cassie was a devoted and dedicated goth, and even dabbled in witchcraft before becoming a Born Again Christian. She was active in her church youth programs and bible study, and was apparently nicknamed ‘Bunny Rabbit’

Corey DePooter, 17
His birthday was the 3rd of March, 1982 and was in his junior year of high school. Corey was on duty as a library volunteer when he was shot once by Dylan Klebold in the left shoulder, and three times in the arm, neck and back by Eric Harris, who was responsible for his death. He perished in the library. Corey was known for his love to fish and his irresistible likableness. “Corey was always able to pick up our spirits in a gloomy situation.” Corey had hoped to serve his country as a marine in the future.

Rachel Scott, 17
Rachel Joy Scott, one of the more well known victims, was born on the 5th of August, 1981 and was also in her junior year of high school when she died. Rachel was shot four times, one shot each, in her arm, rib cage, temple and leg by Eric Harris while she was sitting outside with her friend Richard. She passed away out on the grass. Rachel was a faithful Christian, along with her parents Darrel Scott and Beth Nimmo. She was in the Forensic Club and Drama Club and she had starred in her school play, ‘The Smoke in The Room’, on April 2nd 1999. Rachel was a smoker, but her date to prom, Nick Baumgart, had asked her to quit before prom, which she did, remarkably.

Dylan Klebold, 17
Dylan was born on September 11th, 1981 and died on April 20th 1999 while he was a senior in high school. Dylan, along with his friend Eric Harris, carried out one of the most brutal attacks on a school in American history. He killed 5 people and injured more. Dylan killed himself in the library by shooting himself in the left temple, and passed away approximately 1 to 3 minutes later. Dylan, or in his earlier years, referred to as ‘Sunshine Boy’ by his mother Sue, was interested in both computer games and engineering, and had already been accepted to a college in Arizona prior to the attack. He had said he might’ve liked to do something to do with computers in the future, and was known to his peers as and shy, funny-looking kid, that mostly kept to himself. For a short period of time, he worked alongside Eric in a pizzeria called BlackJacks Pizza.

Lauren Townsend, 18
She was born on the 17th of January, 1981 and was a senior at Columbine High School when she died. Lauren was shot 6 times by Dylan Klebold in the back torso, and suffered 3 more shots in the front torso plus a graze to the head caused by Eric Harris. She perished in the library. Lauren played piano and the clarinet, and was also the captain of the volleyball team, while she also maintained a 4.0 GPA. She planned to work as a technician on a research trip to South America that summer.

Eric Harris, 18
Eric David Harris was born on April 9th, 1981 and was one of the gunmen in one of the worst school shootings ever recorded in history, the Columbine Massacre in ‘99. He killed 8 people and injured more. Eric suffered a drastic blow to the head, after placing his gun in his mouth and shooting himself alongside Dylan Klebold. He died instantly. Eric was indecisive about going to college, but said he was interested in doing something with computers. He was thought to have maybe gone onto do video game design in the future, after he designed his own levels of his favourite computer game, Doom, or maybe to have gone into the army. He worked in BlackJacks Pizza with Dylan Klebold, and was awfully fond of his dog Sparky.

Isaiah Shoels, 18
Isaiah was born on August 4th, 1981, and was in his senior year of high school when he passed away. He was shot once in the left arm, which went through his armpit and then his heart, and exited through his right arm, by Eric Harris, after being called a racial slur by Dylan Klebold. Isaiah was colour blind, and after undergoing heart surgery at 7 months, and after the doctors told his parents he probably wouldn’t live past 5, Isaiah went on to wrestle for Columbine, lift weights and play in the Youth Football League.

William David Sanders, 47
Dave Sanders was born October 22nd 1951, and had been a teacher at Columbine High School for 25 years when he passed away. He suffered two shots in his back which exited through his front by Eric Harris, and he bled out for three hours before dying in the science room. Dave was an exceptionally good sports coach and computers and business teacher. He also coached the girls basketball and softball teams. Dave is thought of as a hero, because of how quick he took to respond and take to action after he heard the news the gunmen were in the school grounds. He spend the last minutes before he got shot running through the halls and making sure no one was outside a classroom. He is survived by his wife, four children and five grandkids.

Rest in Peace, the victims of the Columbine Tragedy.
Valentines Day.

My instincts: “You need a date…”

Me: 

Me: “eh, got too many already…”