is my favorite of all the pictures

“I am revealing no breathtaking secret when I say that Marilyn had a reputation for not being the easiest actress in the world to work with. Her eagerness and ambition cause her to tense up. She has difficulty remembering lines. She has been known to drive directors stark, raving mad. However, an interesting thing happened during the shooting of Itch. My favorite scene in the picture comes close to the end. It is a kind of serious and extremely difficult scene in which The Girl explains to the hero why she finds him exciting and attractive and why his wife has every reason to be jealous. Because of it’s difficulty and the fact that it ends with a long speech from The Girl, it was generally assumed that the scene would need several days to get on film. Billy Wilder patiently struggled through dozens of takes for every scene except this one. Three minutes later it was all over. Marilyn had done it, letter perfect with an emotional impact that caused the entire sound-stage to burst into applause at the end, on the first take. There was no need for a second. She told me later she was able to do the scene because she believed every word of what she was saying and because it seemed to her like the story of her own life.”
- George Axelrod

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I may or may not have forgotten that Snapchat filters existed until this weekend. I also may or may not have forgotten that today is Tuesday, so I’m using these pictures as a last minute option…

Regardless, I hope y'all have a fabulous week! Lots of love from the rainy but otherwise uneventful Midwest. Xx.

Hia! I made a picture that has some of my favorite YouTube channels for anyone who might be wondering. From left to right the channels are: Lordminion777 ( @lordminion ), Markipler ( @markiplier ), Crankgameplays ( @crankgameplays ), PewdiePie ( @pewdie ), Jacksepticeye ( @therealjacksepticeye ), Game Theorist (no account found), Team Edge (no account found), and lastly Wiishu ( @wiishu ). I love these channels and the people who run them so much. They all make me smile and I really enjoy the content made on these channels.

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Just my grandpa and I after my parents wedding ten years ago 🤗 this has to be one of my favorite pictures of all time. I was around five, and I just remember putting complete trust in my grandpa not to let go of my hand and let me fall 😂 if you haven’t heard this today; I love you. You’re beautiful. You matter. I hope you all had an amazeballs Tuesday ✌🏻✌🏻

P.S. it’s been a minute since I last posted a Tuesday selfie, I know I’m sorry, I just haven’t been feeling the greatest lately. So I decided to post a throwback pic from back when I was just a babe to put me in some good spirits 😂

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I worked with him on Avengers “Assembled” which was one of those magical once in a lifetime career moments where you are standing next to a giant and a legend and sharing a frame with him and sharing your heart with him and sharing a precious moment with him.

We spent the entire day together running lines talking about the scene, talking about wanting to find something to do together in the future. Today that is no longer a possibility. These magical moments, the ones that whisper to you their importance as they are happening. The ones that jump out and tell you that you are in a rarefied space, that imprint deeper than other memories or experiences, that lock themselves in and become a part of the patch work of stories that ones calls a “Life”, they are such precious things. It’s easy to take for granted at the time how precious they are, one believes there will be another go at it, another chance to catch the light of a star in the palm of your hand in the span of an afternoon while working on a major motion picture, tucked off from the others, in a sacred cinematic space, where time is inconsequential and there is no camera, and their is no crew, and there are no words, there is only truth and listening and talking. That is what it was like with Harry. His humility, his commitment to acting, his generosity of spirit his kindly vulnerability were all exceptional. He was an exceptional man and I am honored to say that i got to share the screen with him albeit briefly. To date, it is still one of my favorite moments in film making. Today I treasure it even more. When we left each other that day we said, “See you again. I look forward to it.” That never came to pass, but he passed away I wish we had a chance to do it all again. So long Harry Dean, thank you for the gift of your films, your music and your being. God broke the mold on you. 

Rest In Peace. Poet.

I don’t know why, but this is my favorite picture of Yellow Diamond. Her expression is just so…unique. She’s not sad, like Blue and Yellow Zircon; she’s not comically tearing up, like her Pearl; and she isn’t quietly accepting it, like Blue Pearl. She isn’t even legitimately upset, like Blue Diamond.

If she could punch the tears, she would. That’s what this image says to me.

Okay so I was just “casually” watching the ‘Look What You Made Me Do’ music video (again) and this part is literally one of my favorites. We can all agree this was about the apple music letter thing that resulted in everyone calling her ‘money hungry’ and more stupid shit.

The thing is, to me, in this scene the cats represent the small artists who Taylor is trying to help by ‘crashing’ this streaming company. 

In this part, you can see how she is freaking burning the money like why robbing a bank to just watch the money burn, right??While behind the cats are collecting it. I don’t know about you but this picture is screaming “Money hungry, who bitch?”

and then finally when they are leaving we can see how Taylor, unlike the girls, is not carrying a single bag full of money. She was just helping them to get it, she didn’t take absolutely anything. 

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The first day of rehearsal, I was intimidated, because I’m a big SNL fan. It was like, Holy crap, I’m working with Andy Samberg. He turned out to be really nice, so then I thought, Oh, this is awesome. Now he’s my friend. He’s a nonstop idea machine; Andy’s brain is constantly going. I’d expected this zany, crazy, energetic type of guy, but he’s actually very laid-back and sweet.

There’s a certain sweetness and squareness to the way she plays comedy, and I mean that in the best possible way. There’s something very genuine about Melissa.

andy samberg and melissa fumero | good housekeeping magazine (january 2014)

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87 + 6

He had been through some different playoffs, but getting hurt at the time he did, knowing how important it was, he had told me that he went to see his mom in between series and stuff. She wasn’t doing well. She wanted to see him with the Cup. That was important to her. I think that kind of stuck with me after he told me that. We were motivated to get it for him, even though he had to watch.

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The Christmas Invasion - Behind the Scenes [Part 12]

Excerpt from Benjamin Cook’s articles in Doctor Who Magazine #365

“Buckle down, folks,” calls out John Older [first assistant director], his voice resonating around the caves [representing the inside of the Sycorax ship], “cos it’s very difficult to work in here. Let’s go for a take…”

“The door!” screams Billie. “Close the door!”

Noel spins around. As the Sycorax grabs him, he manages to pull the TARDIS door shut just in time. Slam! Door closes. Well, not quite.

“Er - he didn’t close the door,” says Jon. “It’s swung back open.”

“Oh fiddlesticks,” cries Noel, frustrated. “That TARDIS door is such a naughty old thing.”

Actually, that’s not exactly what Noel said. I’m paraphrasing. But this is a family magazine, so let’s just leave it.

“Okay, Noel, you blew the plot,” laughs James [Hawes, director]. “If the door doesn’t close, we’re screwed.”

Other parts of this photoset: [one] [two] [three] [four] [five] [six] [seven] [eight] [nine] [ten] [eleven] [twelve] [thirteen] [fourteen] [fifteen] [sixteen]
[ List of all Doctor Who Behind the Scenes photosets ]

Death Note (2017) and the Comparative Lens

I’ll be honest. When I found out that Death Note was getting an Americanized live action adaptation, I wasn’t too thrilled. In fact, I was terrified that something I loved was going to be straight up murdered before my eyes  — and I wasn’t ready to give it a shot. In fact, I was really unwilling to budge on this until recently.

However, about three hours ago, the movie came out on Netflix. Sitting there with my housemates, I decided to give the movie a shot and check it out. for those of you who would like to avoid spoilers, this is the cutoff point for spoilers. There are an awful lot of them beyond this point.

Death Note is not a particularly new thing to many of us. If you’ve spent an hour talking about anime or reading manga, you know that Death Note exists. Finding out about the series or the source material that preceded this movie is not particularly hard; the hard part comes in discarding the source material to give the movie a fair shake.

When you look at something like this, you have to discard your comparative lens at the start of the movie to suspend your disbelief. When you sit down to watch something like, say, Game of Thrones, you are undertaking that viewing with the understanding that it’s not going to be exactly like it was in A Song of Ice and Fire.

The same thing must be done for Death Note (2017). When you sit down to watch this movie, you have to decide if you want to give it a fair shake. If not, that’s fine, but that’s what I set out to do.

Starting from the top, the movie itself isn’t bad. If you hadn’t seen the anime before watching it, it holds up to a 6/10 or a 7/10, but likely doesn’t pass an 8 on most scales. Let me explain by starting with some discussion on the main cast before getting into the actual synopsis and response.

The casting of Lakeith Stanfield as L is great, and he dramatically outperforms the rest of the cast; his take on L is both familiar to those who want similarities to what they know and slightly more emotive and human to appeal to the audience. His grasp of the character is magnificent, and I’m sure he studied for this role. I’d highly recommend watching this movie just to watch his performance if nothing else.

There’s only one problem with this: his performance feels slightly hollow when put next to Nat Wolff and Willem Dafoe. Willem Dafoe is a great man and a talented actor… but this is by no means his best showing. 

Nat Wolff, comparatively fresh to the silver screen (or technically not, since it’s closer to a direct to DVD release), paints a picture of a very fragmented Light. At times too comedic, too frustrated, and too unbelievable, his portrayal of his character comes across as transparent. It surprised me to find that his version of Light didn’t hold up to the “judge and jury” that the film tries to make him.

Light is at times frustrating and all said, a little annoying. My favorite moment of his in the film comes three minutes in, when a bully punches him in the face and knocks him out.

The funny thing about the casting, though, is that it gives Margaret Qualley, playing Mia Sutton (analogous to Misa, from the series) the chance to shine in a dark way.

Since we’ve now discussed the cast, it’s important to note that the casting for this movie is not to blame or to praise in its success or failure. Whether or not this movie is good does not depend entirely on the choices made in its casting.

The movie itself revolves around Light Turner (an Americanization of Light Yagami), the son of a “hippy” and a police chief. Light, after passing off some homework for money to one of his fellow students, finds the eponymous Death Note when it falls from the sky in the middle of a storm. Light, after meeting Ryuk, is forced to come to terms with the power he now holds… and the consequences that accompany that power.

One of his first confidantes is his fellow student, Mia Sutton; Mia is initially skeptical, but after Light kills a criminal on a live stream, she comes around to his side and the two quickly enter into a strange love affair based on his ability to kill these criminals. Light takes the name “Kira” in order to make law enforcement suspect that he’s actually based in Japan, as “Kira” is a true cognate for the English word “killer.”

Hot on Kira’s heels are his father, who doesn’t know his son is involved, and L, a young detective with a murky past. L quickly deduces that Light is based in Seattle based on the mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of a hostage taker, whose name was only released in the Seattle area.

Correctly linking Kira to Light’s father, L begins the investigation in earnest, accidentally pushing the inexperienced boy and his new powers too far. After quick, dazzling victories over the danger known as Kira, L confronts Light in a coffee shop one night, convinced of his foe’s identity.

It’s at this point that things take a sharp turn. Light, in the films, is just a schoolboy in over his head, eager to impress his girlfriend with his “wicked cool” murder powers. He is not the character most loved in the manga or the anime, and this is why the adaptation must be viewed differently. Light’s identity is discovered after the death of several task force members and the public revelation of his father’s name and face on TV. Unbeknownst to Light, Mia murdered those men with a page from the note, attributing it to Ryuk.

When Mr. Turner isn’t killed, L confronts Light in a cafe at night, revealing to him that he’s aware of the high schooler’s alter ego. After Light tries to explain that he didn’t kill the task force members, his pleas fall on deaf ears, and L tersely informs him that he’ll be brought to justice.

After this, things take a steep, steep increase in pace. Light and Mia manage to take control over Watari using the Death Note, with the rule in place (via the notebook) that a person can be controlled for two days before their death. Light, in order to circumvent Watari’s death, intends to burn the page containing Watari’s name before he dies, sparing him.

Unbeknownst to him, Mia takes the page from his notebook… throwing a spanner in the works.

After the death of Watari, Mia reveals that she’s been planning to take the Death Note for herself. Light is then forced to flee by a vengeance driven L, given the ultimatum that if she doesn’t get the notebook by midnight, that he will die (as she’s written his name on her page).

L catches up to Light in the back of an alley as Light tries to meet Mia at the spot of their last date to hand over the notebook. He tries to explain what happened, but L doesn’t listen… and despite having Light at gunpoint, is knocked out from behind by a nearby citizen who overheard Light admit to being Kira. Grateful for what Kira has done, he lets Light go.

Light makes it to Mia atop a ferris wheel at the pier… and tells her not to take the book, as he’s written her name in it, putting them at a stalemate. Only one page of the book can be burned by its holder (Light), and unbeknownst to Mia, Light has made her death conditional. If she takes the book, she will die.

She takes the book and dies.

Light, having written his plan out in advance before fleeing L earlier, is saved when he falls into the water below the pier and is rescued by an old man, whose name he wrote in the book earlier. At the same time, another old man (both criminals) takes the Death Note for two days while Light recovers, filling out pages for him to give him an alibi.

This is explained to Light’s father while Light recovers in the hospital. The movie comes to an end as L realizes the meaning of a clue Light left him during the movie’s main chase scene; finding a stray page of the Death Note, L contemplates writing Light’s name… and Ryuk comments on the interesting nature of mankind.

Back to the review, though. The narrative pacing of the movie is rushed in the front half, for obvious reasons. The pacing that ensues around the climax of the movie, though, is great. The reveal that Mia is actually the antagonist of the movie makes sense and was well thought out. It’s not blatant, but it is foreseeable if you pay attention to her character throughout.

The cinematography is… amateur. It’s not very refined, and most shots make up for in color what they lack in substance. The camera work, for the most part, resembles a college student’s final short film.

Characters often abandon the rules established for them by their characterization in the first half of the movie in ways I’m unsure of. L turns into an action star in the last thirty minutes, and Light is… well, he’s annoying all the way through, but he never really gets a solid definition. The only way to sum up his character in the film is “inept,” but it does bring you to mentally treat him like a villain, which is good.

Its ending is vastly different from its source material (as L is alive), but ultimately more satisfying. The problems that plague the movie throughout, though, never really go away.

Despite this, most cast members put on a strong performance at least once in the film, and the movie follows a nice, neat arc. Reveals are carefully done and at multiple points, I was on the edge of my seat. Gorey action scenes (usually gratuitous deaths) aren’t cheap; they reinforce the notion that what Light is doing is wrong, even if he’s doing it for the right reasons. At no point do I sympathize with the character, which is a little frustrating, but also familiar.

The soundtrack… I don’t like it. It’s too “eighties” for me. It tries too hard to sound like Miami Vice, for unknown reasons. The music is too heavy handed, and often too easily applied to each scene. At no point am I left to wonder the nonexistent subtleties of its soundtrack.

This movie is a solid thriller, with a satisfying ending, a decent cast and a good narrative arc. Despite this, Death Note (2017) does not follow well with its source material, which it uses primarily as a guideline. If you’re expecting to see familiar faces from the manga (or even the anime), you will be disappointed.

Lakeith Stanfield kills it, though.