irradiation

Overwatch Timeline:
  • 2041: Omnic Crisis Begins
  • 2046: Overwatch Founded
  • 2051: Omnic Crisis Ends
  • 2054: Australian Outback reduced to irradiated wasteland
  • 2071: Overwatch Disbanded
  • 2076: Junkrat teaches McCree what feminism is
Crash course on fake stones/misrepresentations

Because I have been too lazy to type this all up.

Quartz:

  • If your quartz has teeny air bubbles it’s glass.
  • If it’s got a fruit name it’s dyed. End of story. (strawberry, cherry, lemon, pineapple, blueberry) yes there may be some very rare exceptions-fire quartz being dubbed strawberry- but due to the rise in fakes with that name it’s generally called fire quartz now.
  • Aura quartz is a regular quartz that’s been bonded with another material. (man made)
  • Cinnabar Infused Quartz usually reconstituted and mixed together to make a red crystal.
  • Green quartz can be grown in a lab and anything that forrest green color is

Turquoise:

  • Magnesite and howlite look very very similar to turquoise when they’ve been dyed, magnesite will have very deep cracks in it though.
  • No there is no white turquoise. 
  • You can do a uv test to see if it’s real

Amber

  • Often faked with Copal. They look nearly identical.
  • Amber will float in salt water-copal will not.

Irradiated/dyed stones:

  • Very vibrant colors!!

Irradiated: (they irradiate the crystals to get a deeper or more vibrant color)

  • deeply pigmented topaz or kunzite
  • dark (almost black) smokey quartz 
  • very deep pink or red tourmaline 
  • colored diamonds 
  • some cultured pearls 
  • vibrant yellow heliodor 

Dyed:

  • Pearls
  • Agate
  • coral
  • other stones may be dyed as well, generally if it looks fake..it is.

Heat treated stones: (really not a bad thing but if you’re going for natural)

  • Amethyst-lighten color+remove brown
  • Citrine-heat treated amethyst.
  • Aquamarine-remove green
  • Ruby-clearer stone 
  • Sapphire-clearer stone

Rainbow Cal-Silica

  • Nope, completely fake 100%
  • Literally just car paint layered with calcite and resin.

Citrine: (im so sorry)

  • Much of the citrine on the market is lab made.
  • If it’s lab made it’s usually amethyst that’s been heated until it changes color
  • The bottom of these stones will be white with more color at the tips.
  • srry

Lapis Lazuli:

  • High quality is vibrant blue, hard to come by, and very expensive.
  • Low quality howlite, jasper or sodalite is dyed blue, and passed off as lapis.
  • Acetone will remove the dye but damage the stone.

Obsidian:

  • The clear green obsidian you see all over ebay is slag glass.
  • Natural green obsidian has been found but it is opaque and is more gray than green.
  • there is red obsidian as well but again, it’s not a vibrant red and is more brick colored.
  • Wikipedia is not always right.

Goldstone:

  • it’s glass it’s legitimately just glass

Opalite:

  • also glass. 
  • real opalite exists but it’s green and not commonly found
  • once again, don’t believe everything on wikipedia.

Bismuth:

  • Doesn’t naturally form in the crystals, lab made!!!
  • rlly pretty though

Hematite:

  • Not naturally magnetic!
  • Magnetic hematite is 100% man made!

I’ll add more as I come across them~

Crystal Safety, Revisited

There’s an awesome post going around by @prettycitywitch that discusses crystal care and toxicity. I noticed a few errors in it, just due to the source that was used, so I contacted her and got permission to rewrite it to ensure the most accurate information possible is spread around in the witchy community. I’ve gone through every crystal in her list and added a few others. 

Everything in this list has been confirmed by the Gemological Institute of America Laboratory (one of the foremost in gemological research), multiple published mineralogical sources, and/or at least two online mineralogical databases. Crystals of particular concern in each category have been bolded; the other listed crystals have a bit of wiggle room.

Crystals affected by sunlight or heat
Most crystals (including nearly all in this list) are safe to expose to sunlight temporarily - you can wear them in jewelry during the day, for example, but don’t leave them in your windowsill for weeks. In general, colorless crystals may be left in the sun indefinitely, while colored (especially pink) crystals should be stored in a place that doesn’t get direct sun all day. Heat, on the other hand, can easily affect many crystals, but usually only at high temperatures (steam or a jeweler’s torch), so I’ve only included the ones that could be damaged by relatively low temperatures.

  • Amber - may crack in heat
  • Amethyst - may fade over time; safe to expose to sun temporarily
  • Apophyllite - heat can cause flaking; sunlight is fine as long as the specimen is kept cool
  • Maxixe (dark blue beryl) - fades extremely quickly to pale brown in sunlight; color can only be restored through irradiation
  • Azurite - will fade over time with exposure to sunlight; store in a dark, cool environment
  • Celestine - fades in long exposure to sunlight
  • Chrysoprase - may fade in sunlight; restoration of color sometimes possible through prolonged storage in water
  • Fluorite - occasionally can fade in sunlight
  • Hackmanite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Hiddenite - unstable in sunlight and heat to a lesser degree than kunzite; however, some darker green hiddenite is much more unstable than kunzite and great care should be taken, as it can fade in a matter of minutes
  • Kunzite - will fade drastically in sunlight; indoor incandescent light can also slowly affect this stone
  • Larimar - fades over time when exposed to sunlight and heat
  • Morganite - deeper colors or more lilac hues can fade in sunlight
  • Opal - fading is minimal, but sunlight, heat, and changes in air pressure can cause internal fracturing called “crazing”
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may lose color or turn dull in sunlight or heat
  • Sulfur - extremely heat-sensitive; crystals may fracture or burst if left in the sun or held in your hand
  • Topaz - irradiated stones may fade in direct sunlight
  • Tugtupite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Vanadinite - may darken and lose transparency in sunlight
  • Zircon - heat-treated stones may revert to original color over time in sunlight; avoid exposure to UV lights (tanning beds, nail salons, etc)

Water-soluble crystals
Though many crystals will eventually be worn away by water mostly due to tiny particles of other substances suspended in the water, there are very few that will dissolve in water in any significant way. Contrary to what some believe, most crystals with the suffix ‘-ite’ aren’t water-soluble; ‘-ite’ simply means ‘stone’ and is part of most mineralogical names. 

  • Anhydrite - not water-soluble, but instead will absorb water and convert to gypsum; store in a dry environment and do not submerge
  • Boji stone - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron component
  • Calcite - somewhat soluble in slightly acidic water; neutral or slightly alkaline water is usually safe; negligible dissolution in air due to gaseous carbon dioxide
  • Celestine - very slightly soluble
  • Chalcanthite - easily soluble in water, but must be stored in a humid environment
  • Chalcopyrite - not soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Fluorite - very slightly soluble
  • Gypsum - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Halite - easily dissolves in water; moisture from your skin or humidity in the air can eat away at crystals
  • Hematite - not water-soluble, but exposed rough areas may rust
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble; solubility increases with presence of salt
  • Magnetite - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Malachite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Marcasite - water may trigger decomposition into melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid
  • Mica (muscovite, fuchsite, lepidolite, etc) - plate or sheet-like specimens may absorb water into cleavage planes and begin to break apart; aggregated crystals are safe in water
  • Pyrite - exposure to water, including high-humidity environments, can trigger breakdown
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Selenite - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Sulfur - soluble in warm water; may form sulfuric acid over time if left in a wet or humid environment
  • Ulexite - dissolves in hot water; slightly soluble in cold water

Acid-soluble crystals
A large number of crystals will dissolve in acid. Many only dissolve in strong acids, such as hydrochloric acid - I won’t list those here because it generally won’t be a concern. There is very little information on mineral solubility in weak acids, such as vinegar, so this list is incomplete. But really, why are you soaking any of your crystals in acid?

  • Amber - “young amber” is soluble in a large number of chemicals
  • Aragonite - easily soluble, even in dilute acids; effervesces
  • Atacamite - readily soluble in acids
  • Azurite - may be slightly soluble
  • Calcite - easily soluble; effervesces
  • Lapis lazuli - composed of a number of minerals, including calcite, which may be acid-soluble; acetone and other substances may remove dye
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble in acids
  • Malachite - readily soluble in acids; color may also be affected
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - soluble in acids; surface will become dull and pitted
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in warm acids; effervesces
  • Smithsonite - effervesces and dissolves in acids
  • All water-soluble crystals

Crystals affected by salt
Salt is a dehydrator, so any hydrated crystal may be damaged by it. Salt has a hardness of 2 to 2.5 and may scratch any mineral softer than this. It is safe to put non-hydrated crystals of a hardness between 2.5 and 7 in salt, but very fine scratches may occur due to impurities; don’t put cabochons or faceted stones in this hardness range in salt.

  • Apophyllite - may dehydrate in salt, resulting in flaking; usually not an issue unless combined with heat
  • Cavansite - may dehydrate
  • Chalcanthite - dehydrates easily, forming potentially dangerous powder; store in a humid environment
  • Gypsum (including selenite) - hardness of 2; may be scratched by salt; may dehydrate to anhydrite
  • Opal - will dehydrate and develop internal fractures called “crazing”; store in a wet or humid environment
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may become dull and pitted
  • Stilbite - may dehydrate

Potentially dangerous crystals

In general, crystals are pretty safe - handling them is usually okay. Many crystals do have somewhat dangerous elements, such as aluminum-bearing garnets, but they’re “locked” in the crystal structure in a way that prevents them from harming us unless the crystal is powdered or dissolved and inhaled/ingested. The occasional garnet or moonstone gem water won’t hurt you in the slightest.

Because there’s no way for this list to be ‘complete’ - I don’t know what unusual stones you might have - I advise you to never make gem waters with or otherwise ingest

  • powdery, very fine, or fibrous crystals;
  • crystals which you have not identified;
  • metal ores;
  • metals, with the exceptions of gold, platinum, tungsten, and titanium; and
  • stones composed of a variety of minerals.

Don’t use these crystals for gem water, elixir, massage oil, etc. Don’t put these crystals in your mouth or otherwise insert them into your body.

  • Adamite - contains arsenic
  • Amazonite - generally safe, but the color is usually caused by traces of lead; don’t use flaky or powdery specimens in gem waters
  • Atacamite - contains copper
  • Aurichalcite - contains copper and zinc
  • Azurite - contains copper
  • Boji stone - composition can vary, so some stones may have dangerous components
  • Brochantite - contains copper
  • Cerussite - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust
  • Chalcanthite - contains copper; wash hands after handling; do not rub eyes after handling; do not inhale; do not ingest
  • Chalcopyrite - ore of copper
  • Chrysocolla - contains copper
  • Cinnabar - ore of mercury; always wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust; never ingest in any form; do not heat; massive (aggregate) cinnabar can contain elemental mercury which is very easily absorbed by the body
  • Conichalcite - contains copper and arsenic
  • Cuprite - contains copper; do not ingest
  • Dioptase - delicate, may break or crumble into powder; contains copper
  • Eilat stone - contains copper
  • Galena - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; flaky/crumbly specimens are common, be careful not to inhale dust
  • Malachite - contains copper
  • Marcasite - decomposes to melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid; do not ingest; wash hands after handling; do not inhale
  • Mohawkite - contains copper and arsenic; may contain other toxins
  • Psilomelane - contains barium
  • Pyrite - broken-down pyrite can contain sulfuric acid; do not ingest; if pyrite appears blackish or crumbly, wash hands after handling
  • Realgar - contains arsenic; wash hands after handling; never ingest
  • Serpentine (sp. chrysotile) - safe unless fibrous; do not inhale; asbestos
  • Stibnite - very soft; contains antimony
  • Sulfur - can form sulfuric acid when in contact with moisture
  • Turquoise - usually safe unless powdery; contains copper
  • Vanadinite - contains lead; may have traces of arsenic
  • Wulfenite - ore of lead and molybdenum; do not ingest or inhale

A few final safety reminders

⚠️ Never swallow any crystals, because some otherwise safe crystals can interact with your stomach acids and produce dangerous chemicals.

⚠️ Never crush, powder, or dissolve crystals with the intention of inhaling or ingesting them - fine powders and solutions make elements more accessible to the body.

⚠️ Wash your crystals in water and gentle soap before making any gem waters, elixirs, etc. with them. Even if the crystal itself is safe, it may have been in contact with other dangerous crystals or chemicals.

⚠️ Never make gem water, elixirs, etc. with crystals that are on/in matrix (the base rock the crystals grew from). You don’t know what the matrix is composed of, and it may contain dangerous minerals or elements.

⚠️ Never burn, hold in a candle flame, or intentionally heat your crystals. Intentional heating should only be performed by a jewelry or gemstone professional in a controlled environment.
The sole exception to this is anhydrite without matrix, which may be carefully raised to 200°C (~400°F), dry heat, to dehydrate it and change any gypsum components back to anhydrite. Be aware that this process can occasionally result in fractures, breakage, or internal damage to the stone.

Keep yourself and your crystals safe, everyone! There’s no way for this list to be complete, because there are thousands of minerals out there, so please feel free to contact me if you have questions about any particular stones!

4

“The radium water worked fine until his jaw fell out”

From the early 20th century up to the 1930’s the use of radioactive materials for dubious quack medical cures were common.  There were various machines which could irradiate the body, radium laced salves and creams, radioactive medicines, radium cosmetics, and a wide variety of other radioactive products.  One popular product was radioactive health water.  Often distilled water containing radium, it was marketed to treat or cure a wide variety of ailments. Whether you suffered from rheumatism or cancer, or if you simply need a boost of revigorating energy in your day to day life, radium water was a miracle cure for just about anything.  Many radium water producers advocated drinking radium water as a necessity of healthy living.  At first companies simply sold bottled radium water on its own.  Later, various products were marketed as a way to make your own radium water at home. Such products were either inserts which were placed in a jar of water, or were radium lined crocks with a tap which one used to brew radium water.

Radium water was legally sold until 1932 when a famous athlete named Eben Beyers died that year.  Beyers was a popular consumer and spokesperson for Radithor, a brand of radium water manufactured by Baily Radium Laboratories Inc.  It was founded by Dr. William J. A. Baily, who was not a real doctor but claimed his concoction of distilled water, radium, and mesothorium gave the consumer extra energy and strength.  In 1932, Beyers had to have his jaw removed due to mouth cancer.  A short time later he was dead.  The Wall Street Journal did an expose of Radithor entitled “The Radium Water Worked Fine Until his Jaw Fell Out”.  Outrage from Beyers’ death forced the Food and Drug Administration to investigate the dangers of radioactive health products, which eventually led to a ban in 1933.

There is nothing mysterious or natural about authority. It is formed, irradiated, disseminated; it is instrumental, it is persuasive; it has status, it establishes canons of taste and value; it is virtually indistinguishable from certain ideas it dignifies as true, and from traditions, perceptions, and judgements it forms, transmits, reproduces. Above all, authority can, indeed must, be analyzed.
—  Edward W. Said, Orientalism
Good Girls Don’t

There are a lot of things good girls don’t. They don’t laugh too loud, they don’t dress too short, they don’t swear and they don’t put themselves out there. They wait, and they do it while sitting properly in their pristine white dresses, with their hands crossed over their laps and their back sitting up straight.

There’s a lot of things good girls don’t and getting their panties wet every time they see a guy is definitely one of them.

You rubbed your thighs together as your fingers pressed tightly to the table you were sitting on, trying to hold on to a reality that was slipping away as you looked at him. You imagined the taste of his skin, and how it must have felt against yours when he was lying on top of you, and you thought about the fire of his kiss, and how it probably tasted like peppermint and just a tiny hint of sin. You thought about heaven and having him lie next to you at night.

The fire that had settled in your lower tummy was going to consume you all at any moment, and you shifted in your seat, trying to release some of the pressure that had built between your legs. You were definitely wet.

But as much as you tried, you couldn’t stop thinking about him, imagining yourself on your knees while your eyes obediently locked in with his. You imagined your lips wrapping around the two fingers he was offering to you, and the light bob you would do to take them all the way in, while your tongue pressed to them to suck them lightly, looking at him as his eyes, usually green and sweet, turned dark, the burning lust covering them as he gazed down at you. You even imagined the light gag of your throat as he pushed his fingers all the way in, and the moan that bubbled up from your very core when he slid them out, the strings of spit that fell down making you blush as you looked down.

“Look at me, yeah?” He would say, with his voice a little raspier than usual as he kneeled in front of you. “C’mon, kitten, look at me.” He would repeat his command slowly, a smirk curling up the corner of his lips as your eyes fluttered open to obey him. “Look at me while I fuck ya with my fingers, yeah? Use all that spit you left. Were you imagining my cock?” He would ask, his smirk growing bigger as you nodded, still unable to speak your own words, as your heart was knotting on your throat and beating rapidly at the sight of him. “You’re such a fucking good girl.”

Keep reading

3

Mother

Inspired by Fallout 4. For anyone who hasn’t played any Fallout games, feral ghouls are humans who were horribly irradiated in the nuclear war.
The radiation caused their brains to deteriorate, they are violent and have no ability to reason. But sometimes after killing one, you might find that they were carrying with them a baby rattle or some keepsake from their lives before.

I always wonder if they get glimpses of loved ones and memories from their old lives. And if they retain any part of themselves from before.

Maybe she’s remembering someone.

3

Fantasy Flight Games is proud to announce Fallout, a post-nuclear adventure board game based on Bethesda’s blockbuster video game series. In Fallout, one to four players take on a role within an irradiated landscape inspired by those in Fallout 3, Fallout 4, and their downloadable content expansions. With just a few locations pinpointed on their map, the players choose whether to work together or individually to explore these mysterious regions that lay before them. Along the way, each player will face a wealth of choices, deciding whether to pursue experience or Caps, collect loot or loyal companions, and progress the main questline or veer off to the vaults. As the players move around the board, building their skills and filling their inventory, the area’s warring factions will gain power, forcing the players to pledge loyalty or defy conformity, all in pursuit of gaining the most influence of anyone else in the wasteland.


The game should be released in 4Q of 2017!!! Price 59.99 USD
More on fantasyflightgames.com

☣️ Dystopian AU Starters ☣️

Send a symbol to see how our characters suffer. 👌

📺  Nineteen Eighty-Four - Our characters live in a world where their every move and every thought is watched by the government. Informants and spies known as the Thought Police are everywhere, and dissenters are taken to the horrifying Room 101. There is no escape. You can only survive.

🔥 Fahrenheit 451 - Our characters live in a world where books are banned, and those who are not “normal” seem to vanish. Any books found will be burned by the “firemen”, armed with gasoline and flamethrowers, and dissenters are tracked down by the fearsome mechanical Hound.

🍊 A Clockwork Orange - Our characters live in a world where young people form oddly-dressed gangs and engage in horrific violence, committing crimes unhindered by adults. 

👩 The Handmaid’s Tale - Our characters live in a world where a religious military dictatorship has been enforced. Fertile women are forced to become Handmaids, and made to conceive for the continuation of the dying human race. They are forbidden from reading and conversation in this world is strictly controlled by a set script. Spies known as Eyes are everywhere, and those who do not conform are sent to die in the irradiated Colonies.

🛒 The Road - Our characters live in a world where an apocalypse event has occurred, barely anyone is left alive, and the environment around them is barren and bleak. Their only hope is travelling to a location they hope still exists. Everyone and everything is a threat, and they must scavenge what they can to survive.

🏃 The Running Man - Our characters live in a world where a totalitarian society has taken over, and a violent game show known as The Running Man exists. A contestant is declared an enemy of the state, and given a 12-hour head start before the Hunters, an elite team of hitmen, are sent to kill them. They can travel anywhere in the world, but viewers earn money for revealing their whereabouts. They earn $100 for every hour they stay alive, extra for killing law enforcement or Hunters, and win a grand prize of $1 billion for surviving for 30 days. Nobody has ever won it.

💭 The Chrysalids - Our characters live in a world where people who are “different” are branded as “blasphemies” and killed without mercy. Any visible variation in genetics can be grounds for being eliminated. However, some have an invisible mutation - they have telepathic abilities.

❌ Harrison Bergeron - Our characters live in a world where everyone is expected to be perfectly equal. People are given “handicaps”. Strong people are made to wear heavy weights. Beautiful people must wear masks. Intelligent people must wear ear radios, which play sounds to stop one’s thoughts. Everyone is equal, but at what cost?