ironwood national forest

Taking its name from one of the longest living trees in the Arizona desert, the 129,000-acre Ironwood Forest National Monument is a true Sonoran Desert showcase. 🌵 Keeping company with the ironwood trees are mesquite, palo verde, creosote, and saguaro – blanketing the monument floor beneath rugged mountain ranges named Silver Bell, Waterman and Sawtooth. In between, desert valleys lay quietly to complete the setting. The national monument also contains habitat for the cactus ferruginous pygmy owl and desert bighorn sheep dwelling, which makes hiking, wildlife watching and photography favorite activities in this desert jewel. Photo by Bob Wick, @mypubliclands.

npr.org
Trump To Sign Executive Order That Could Shrink National Monuments
The Interior Secretary says, under the policy, his department will review protective designations since 1996 of 100,000 acres or more, particularly their size.

Oh hell no.  NO no no no no no no.

Monuments under threat:

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah, proclaimed by President Clinton in 1996. (1.7 million acres).

Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in Arizona, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (1 million acres).

Giant Sequoia National Monument in California, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (327,769 acres).

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (279,568 acres).

Hanford Reach National Monument in Washington, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (194,450 acres).

Canyons of the Ancients National Monument in Colorado, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (175,160 acres).

Ironwood Forest National Monument in Arizona, proclaimed by Clinton in 2000 (128,917 acres).

Sonoran Desert National Monument in Arizona, proclaimed by Clinton in 2001 (486,149 acres).

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument in Montana, proclaimed by Clinton in 2001 (377,346 acres).

Carrizo Plain National Monument in California, proclaimed by Clinton in 2001 (204,107 acres).

Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean, proclaimed by President George W. Bush in 2006 and expanded by President Barack Obama in 2016, (89.6 million acres).

World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in California, Hawaii and Alaska, proclaimed by Bush in 2008 (4 million acres).

Marianas Trench Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean, proclaimed by Bush in 2009 (60.9 million acres).

Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean, proclaimed by Bush in 2009 and enlarged by Obama in 2014. (55.6 million acres).

Rose Atoll Marine National Monument in American Samoa, proclaimed by Bush in 2009 (8.6 million acres).

Rio Grande del Norte National Monument in New Mexico, proclaimed by Obama in 2013. (242,555 acres).

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument in New Mexico, proclaimed by Obama in 2014 (496,330 acres).

Basin and Range National Monument in Nevada, proclaimed by Obama in 2015 (703,585 acres).

Berryessa Snow Mountain in California, proclaimed by Obama in 2015 (330,780 acres).

Northeast Canyons & Seamounts Marine National Monument in the Atlantic Ocean, proclaimed by Obama in 2016 (3.1 million acres).

Mojave Trails National Monument in California, proclaimed by Obama in 2016 (1.6 million acres).

Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, proclaimed by Obama in 2016 (1.4 million acres).

Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada, proclaimed by Obama in 2016 (296,937 acres).

Sand to Snow National Monument in California, proclaimed by Obama in 2016 (154,000 acres).

(stats from USA Today: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/04/26/24-national-monuments-threatened-trumps-executive-order/100925418/)