iron and silver

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Source : white-vomit.tumblr.com <3

Hematite is coloured black to steel or silver-grey, brown to reddish brown, or red. It is mined as the main ore of iron. Varieties include kidney ore, martite (pseudomorphs after magnetite), iron rose and specularite (specularhematite). 

@sixpenceee I recently found this material in a crystal store and I love it so much.

Ten Magickal Metals and Their Uses in Witchcraft

Hey everyone, it’s been a while. I’m in a better place now, and though my mini-sabbatical was necessary, I hated not updating you all! I can’t wait any longer, so I’m back! 

Most people know that certain crystals or stones have associations in Witchcraft, but people seem to forget that this is a relatively new area of Craft. Prior to that, for thousands and thousands of years, Witches and smiths used metals to work their magick and skill, and this shouldn’t be forgotten today! 

Alloys have different associations to pure metals, so I’ll do them separately.


Pure Metals:

  • Iron - Probably the most common metal in Witchcraft, it’s associated with repelling of spirits, demons, Fae, and magick generally. It’s a dousing metal, one that channels magick exceptionally well, and as such will “pull” magick out of the user. Enchantments don’t stick to iron objects, and any spells placed on them will fade almost immediately or simply not stick in the first place. 

  • Copper - An ancient and useful technology, copper is said to be the second metal ever worked by human hands, and the first to be made into tools. It’s primary associations are with craft and manufacture, especially workings done with one’s own hands or skill. Amulets made from copper are said to enhance skill at creative or inventive endeavours, and altar tools made from copper will work very well for constructive magick or rituals. It’s also strongly associated with harmony and balancing, making it an excellent metal to include in altars focused around balance.

  • Steel - Whilst technically an alloy, it’s an alloy of iron and a non-metal (carbon) so I’m going to put it in this section. Steel is strongly associated with weapons and armour, and for this reason it works well for defensive magick, destructive magick, and for athames. It retains iron’s strong resistance to magickal enchantment, which for an athame is a good thing - you don’t want the magick “sticking” to your tools, so something like iron or steel is kind of like using a non-stick pan to cook your eggs.

  • Tin - The working of iron is called “blacksmithing”, and conversely the working of tin is called “whitesmithing”, because whilst iron oxidises black under heat, tin remains quite pale. In the ancient world, this metal was highly sought-after, as it is the crucial ingredient in the manufacture of bronze, an alloy of tin, copper, and occasionally some other metals. As a result, it was highly priced and much haggled-over, and so it’s primary associations are with money, trading, prosperity and success. It’s also very strongly associated with British Witchcraft, because Britain had so much tin that the Romans and Greeks called Britain “the Tin Isles”. 

  • Gold - The first metal worked by humans, the purity, rarity and unparalleled lustre of gold have made it one of the most sought-after metals of all time. Regarded as one of the “noble metals” by alchemists, and one of the precious metals by almost everyone else, gold is of course strongly associated with money, fortune and trading. However, it’s also associated with intelligence, because of the alchemical pursuits followed to try to transmute things into it; and with purity, because it is biologically so inert that Victorian doctors used to coat pills for rich people in 24k gold leaf to mask the taste without harming the patients. It’s an excellent channelling substance, though I doubt anyone will have enough of it for a whole wand! Perhaps just a tip, then!

  • Silver - Although less prized than gold, this highly lustrous and workable material is also regarded as a precious metal. Due to its unique atomic structure, silver is the most conductive element in the universe - this makes it an unparalleled channelling metal, and it’s much lower cost than gold makes this a theoretically possible metal to make wands for energy-workers and for ceremonial wands for covens. It’s also a very pure metal, and is strongly associated with healing, growth, and cleansing of disease and impurity from the body. Amulets suspended on a silver chain will be imbued with healing energies, strengthening any enchantments upon them, and assisting in the boosting of the wearer’s natural immune system. 

  • Lead - Contrary to popular belief, lead is not toxic to hold in your hands any more than nickel, antimony, or other metals that are often toxic by ingestion. Whilst it’s not advised to wear it as an amulet (because prolonged rubbing against the acidic oils in the skin will cause them to react with the metal over time and be absorbed into your body), holding a charm in your hands or wearing one for only a day or so is not dangerous to your health. This metal is associated strongly with travel, adventure, and safe voyages across both space and emotion. It’s also a metal associated with intelligence and academia, and with magick of all kinds. Pendulums made using lead weights or pendants will be unparalleled for divination. In fact, my own original divinatory pendant is made using a lead fishing weight and an old key, and whilst I now have a fancy new one made with rose quartz and pure silver, my old lead pendulum is still my absolute favourite! 


Alloys:

  • Bronze - An alloy made from the combining of approximately 85% copper and 15% tin. This alloy has many superior qualities compared to both individual metals, and this has made it a first choice metal for a great many people from artists to cooks to metallurgists throughout the ages. Stronger than both tin and copper, and with a higher melting temperature and toughness rating than either, this metal is associated strongly with grand endeavours, imaginative or ambitious projects, and with collaborative enterprises. Bronze would be an excellent component of any spell intended to enhance your performance at your job, in seeking employment, or in advancing your own social or career goals. 

  • Pewter - This alloy has become rarer in these more modern times, but in the Medieval and Renaissance periods pewter was one of the most commonly used metals available. It’s main component is tin, and whilst most pewter is about 92% tin you can get pewter with as little as 80% tin and as much as 99%! The remaining ~8% is usually copper, antimony, and in old alloys lead is often a component (lead is almost always absent in modern pewter for safety reasons). This alloy is the metal that’s most strongly connected to kitchen witchery, followed by cast iron and copper, because it has been used for over a thousand years to make everything from cutlery to plates to flagons. It’s also associated with “common” magick, the magick of everyday people (as opposed to what were traditionally called the “higher” magicks like alchemy and energy-working). So long as your pewter is free of lead, it’s safe to keep it near your skin, or to eat or drink from it. Potions are more powerful when brewed in cauldrons made of pewter, and your kitchen spells will work more effectively when you use pewter in the working somewhere.

  • Electrum - One of my favourite metals of all time, electrum is a naturally-occurring alloy of gold and silver, often with trace quantities of copper, platinum and palladium in the alloy too. Natural electrum comes in two common varieties; 10-30% silver, which is found mostly in the regions of Western Anatolia; and 50%-60% silver, which is found in the regions around Ancient Lydia (a large empire stretching across much of Asia Minor). However, most modern electrum is alloyed artificially, allowing finer control over the quality of the alloy and making it easier to work with artistically. Electrum is very much a metal associated with commerce - many regions such as the Lydian empire used electrum as a basis for their coins, as opposed to pure gold or pure silver, and it has always been a highly valued commodity. It’s also a very strongly artistic metal, as electrum has been used to make everything from the capstone of the Great Pyramid of Giza (sadly, this has long since been stolen by looters over the centuries), to wedding bands for pagan marriages. Electrum is a metal of love and emotion, and in its alloying of two precious and beautiful metals to make a product greater than the sum of its parts, it represents the joining of two lives together into a single whole to produce a love that will last across all time. Personally, I’d like my wedding band to be made of electrum!

——

Metals are a much overlooked, but incredibly useful addition to any Witch’s arsenal of magick tools, and I hope most sincerely that this has been useful for all of you wonderful Witches out there looking to expand your collection of Witchery supplies beyond common items like crystals and tarot cards. Remember that Witchcraft isn’t about doing what everyone else does, but rather it’s about doing what only you’ve ever done! As always everyone, Witchcraft is not a thing you do, it’s a thing you ARE - Witchcraft is in the mind, and so be sure to practice your Craft exactly how YOU know it should be practiced.

Blessed be~!
– Juniper WildWalk

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“Ours is a war for life itself, and should we fail the world dies with us.”

🔥Theirs is the Song of Ice and Fire ❄️

Unpopular Opinion::

I don’t want Aelin to save herself from Maeve and the Iron Coffin.

Book after book after book, we have seen Aelin pull herself out of some pretty hairy situations and always be her own champion, which is great. She is strong and defiant and that’s what makes her such an incredible character.

However, EoS is largely about her learning to trust others to carry the load, to un-clench her hands from the wheel and let others help or trust them to risk their lives to complete whatever mission.

We’ve SEEN Aelin pull herself out of the jaws of death, with and without Rowan giving a little nudge… I think it’s time we see Aelin’s court come for her and save her. Not a nudge to put her over the edge, a full-on rescue to show they are her equals.

On the one hand, she’s the Fire-Breathing Bitch Queen, Heir of Mala Firebringer and Annoyer of the Goddess Dianna, and I think she will burn that Iron Coffin to silver from the inside out.

But on the other hand, I think it’d be nice if instead of Aelin handling it solo, her inner circle could more directly show her they are just as dangerous as she is and break her out in some daring plan that would make her proud.

Aelin will get her time in the limelight when she burns through Erawan and Maeve, so it’d be nice for her Inner Circle to have the win too and make her proud. It’s time for Aelin to play a role she never has before: damsel in distress.

Just a thought.

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moodboard: evangeline samos (red queen series)

“while the other girls wore silk dresses and a few had strange, gilded armor, this evangeline rises in an outfit of black leather. jacket, pants, boots, all studded with hard silver. no, not silver. iron. silver is not so dull or hard. her house cheers for her, all of them on their feet. she belongs to ptolemus and the patriarch, but others cheer too, other families. they want her to be queen. she is the favorite.”

Calron's Easter
  • Aaron: Okay Call open your eyes
  • Call: What am I looking at?
  • Aaron: It's an Easter egg hunt, you have to find the eggs
  • Call: Okay
  • Call:
  • Call: Um I'm pretty sure I got them all, why do they all have letters on them
  • Aaron: It spells out something, figure it out
  • Call:
  • Call:
  • Call, reading: Will.. you.. go.. out with me?
  • Aaron: Oh I thought you would never ask!
  • Call: You're such a dork Aaron
  • Aaron: So that's a..
  • Call: Yes, that's a yes.

dragonsateyourtoast  asked:

A new student wears no iron or silver. She ignores instructions to do so. She seems bold as brass, limping around at night with not a single defense or care in the world. But the Gentry do not take advantage of this; instead they actually steer clear of her, as if she were wearing more iron than they could stand to see. When someone finally gathers the courage to ask her about it, she laughs. "I have arthritis," she says, smiling. "I've had four joints replaced."

SO METAL

Magisterium Characters as Popular Internet Things
  • Aaron: CASH ME OUSSIDE HOW BOW DAH
  • Drew: Me, an intellectual
  • Call: The bee movie
  • Master Rufus: The gif of the guy walking in with the pizza
  • Tamara: That's a _____ you uncultured swine!
  • Alex: "Tag yourself" memes
  • Jasper: (wake me up) wake me up inside

Theatre technicians, overlooked and fearless magicians of blackout, set, backstage, are people you want on your side. They fade into the background, often, their work done out of the dazzling lights, but they work hard, and they don’t take kindly to not being acknowledged.

(It’s hard to tell when technicians go missing sometimes. The changelings are often very similar to the human they replace.)

Make allies of the costume shop—most costumes have at least some hand-stitching, and if you’re polite and friendly, they’ll make sure to knot their thread with three loops around a needle, and to tie it off in three neat motions. The costumers believe in threes, and their ability to ward off the Gentry. It’s not steel or iron or salt, nothing so powerful. It’s a little more insurance, a knot to tie you to earth.

Mostly, they do it automatically. Technicians are a practical and time-starved lot, and no one wants to frantically re-fit a costume at the last minute. But don’t push them. Go too far, and the threes will stop being a priority for their clever hands. They can’t and won’t make sure that you’re taken. But they can stop helping to protect you.

Among technicians, it’s carpenters and props people who are Taken the most often. Both groups are a special kind of strange, and they work with their hands to bring beauty out of nothing. Give a carpenter two pieces of plywood, some two by four and a mission, and they’ll overcomplicate it to impossibility and pull it off anyway. Props people are the kind who look at scattered scraps and trash, and see what could be, not what is. Swords of cardboard, fine chocolates of clay, embossed leather armor from foam. Illusion, for a props person, is king, and it’s no wonder the Gentry find them fascinating.

(Props has sent people onstage with bona fide magical objects, lost to the prop room years ago. It’s the ruthlessness in them, the mercenary way of taking whatever works.)

Electricians are safest, the ones who are closest to the technology of it all, who spend hours on high, calling information back and forth in a code unintelligible to the uninitiated. They chatter, and they clamp and tighten and connect and swear, and suddenly there is light, and color, and glitter. The Gentry are amazed, but do not understand. What you do not understand is best left alone.

(Still, some electricians go missing. Maybe they sing, or they see, or they’re thoughtlessly kind or cruel—no one is safe, here. This is the theater, liminal, filled with Gentry even on a good day, and being safe is so often at odds with doing things fast that it’s not unheard of for electricians to climb precariously, thank thoughtlessly, or strip off iron jewelry.)

Designers bargain most often, sometimes thoughtless and sometimes with clever words and clever research and a clever friend who knows contract law. Sometimes it’s for inspiration, which often goes badly—those are desperate people, and the Gentry are not kind to the desperate. Sometimes it’s for persuasiveness, or money, or, most precious of all, time.

(I need more time, is the motto of the department, the guiding light of a program always living under a deadline. Give me more time.)

Elsewhere University’s stage managers, the ones who make leaving stick, are good. Really good. Flexible, punctual, smart, good with names and at ironclad paperwork. They’re capable of corralling even the most difficult personalities with charming words and a refusal to back down, and that makes them valuable. But they never break old habits, of opening night gifts made from rowan, and closing night gifts of iron and silver, and they’re deeply superstitious.

(The fines, for touching props that don’t belong to you, are a serious business when an EU alum is stage managing.)

The few who learn to weld and build with steel from the metalworking students are safest, with steel shavings scattered in their clothes and hair, on their skin. They’re still not safe. All too often, they’re carpenters too, and it just takes one day, when the steel has finally washed away, and the rings have been yanked off to avoid losing a finger, or they ask, criminally careless, for help building or learning or understanding.

A good handful of technicians go missing every year. Most of them will make it back, better, or at least stranger, than before.

After a semester or two of working in the theatre shop, or a show or three, most technicians will go to Cat Eyes. Most of them, by the time they graduate, have a distinctly odd pair of safety glasses, never far from them. Theatre is about syncretism, about everything working, and if you can’t see it all, if you can’t see if the costume really matches the actor’s skin tone, or if the light is unflattering on half the ensemble, you can’t make it right.

With those glasses on, it’s never about seeing anyone. It’s about looking at costumes, light, paint, props. Nothing else matters.

(Technicians remember the most about The Play when it’s performed. The costume shop remembers the way the fabrics slipped through their fingers, bright and silken and gorgeous. The carpenters remember building, the lumber straight and clean and lovely. Tech is a blur, and no one remembers who stage managed, but it’s better than other shows. You don’t think about it in the moment—it’s just another six-to-ten tech, and you bring your coffee and your bagel and don’t think about the paper your history professor wants tomorrow. After, though. After, you realize it was The Play. Some few students can’t bear to give that seamless beauty up. The department faculty has to come from somewhere.)

A last word of advice: When the show is on, always be polite to whoever you meet backstage. You never know who they really are—Gentry, ghost, short-tempered technician who will spend two hours unpicking every single three-loop knot in every one of your costumes—and if you say the wrong thing, you’ll regret it. And pay attention to the show. Actors have gotten lost before, the crossovers stretching on forever, lost eternally in the moment right before their entrance.

[x]

The Salt Men of Iran - By 2010, the remains of six men were discovered in the Chehrabad salt mines, located in Hamzehlu Village. Most of the men had been accidentally killed while working in the mines. The first man was discovered in 1993 and was accompanied by some artefacts which included three iron knives, a silver needle, some pottery and some other things. Over the forthcoming years, five more bodies were found, all in outstanding preservation. The oldest is estimated to date back to 9550 B.C.