irin news

3 Sept 2012

A bad thing:

As the world’s supply of staple grains grows tight, scientists are learning about the discovery in South Africa of yet another deadly variant of Ug99 stem rust, a virulent fungal disease that can devastate wheat crops within weeks. 

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/Report/96231/FOOD-Another-strain-of-deadly-wheat-fungus-in-South-Africa

16 Aug 2012

A good thing:

Senegalese law does not make birth declaration mandatory, yet birth certificates are required for enrolling a child in school and registering to write exams. The remoteness of some villages from civil registration centres, combined with poverty, have hampered birth registration. But a new mobile phone application that allows parents to text the details of a newborn to obtain a birth certificate could cut down school drop-outs when the children are older. 

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/Report/96066/SENEGAL-Texting-for-birth-certificates

30th Sept 2012

A bad thing:

The last group of over 300 people from Menik Farm, once the world’s largest camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Sri Lanka, have been moved out, but not to their former villages because their land was being occupied by the military. Instead they were relocated on state-owned land and must wait to hear if they will be able to return home or, if not, whether they will receive compensation.

Read more: http://www.IRINnews.org/Report/96416/SRI-LANKA-Final-batch-of-Menik-Farm-IDPs-relocated

23 Aug 2012

A good thing:

Quietly, a revolution to develop cheap ways to draw water for irrigation is unfolding in small villages and rural regions in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Small farmers, tired of waiting for governments to deliver aid, have found ways to access motor pumps, build reservoirs or ponds to harvest rain water to improve their crop yields. And it is paying off. 

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/Report/96166/FOOD-A-quiet-water-revolution

5 July 2012

A bad thing:

Less than 1 percent of humanitarian aid targets people aged over 60. Older people are affected more severely than the rest of the population during displacement. “People who have energy can resist or run or take away belongings. An old person doesn’t have the energy to do all this. So in cases of forced evictions, for instance, they lose a home and lose belongings and also a critical social network,” Protus Waringa, a Kenyan human rights law expert. 

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/Report/95801/DISPLACEMENT-Older-people-face-greater-burdens

4 May 2012

A bad thing:

As at May 2011, almost 800 (including approximately 100 girls), aged 12 to 18 were being held in 31 Juvenile Rehabilitation Centres. 29 center were located in rented properties that had not been designed to house juveniles and lacked rehabilitation programmes or recreational facilities. Many children are not provided with a medical check-up before being placed in detention and those who become sick struggle to access to medical attention. The food is not nutritionally adequate, there’s nowhere to play and no toys or equipment to play with. Children also struggle to get an education as many facilities lack books, pens and writing paper.

Read more: http://www.irinnews.org/Report/95405/AFGHANISTAN-Concerns-over-child-detention-conditions-in-Kandahar