iran modern

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THE MOST IMPORTANT HOUSE IN IRANIAN MODERNISM IS BEING THREATENED WITH DEMOLITION. YOU CAN HELP

Villa Nemazee by Gio Ponti [1957] in Tehran, Iran in collaboration with Fausto Melotti and Paolo De Poli [1957-64]. 

Please sign this petition and save Iranian architectural heritage.

https://www.change.org/p/to-prevent-demolition-of-nemazee-villa-designed-by-italian-architect-gio-ponti

Things in modern history we should’ve learned in school, but didn’t:

Things in modern history we should’ve learned, but didn’t:

  • The Troubles, a series of violent conflicts between the Irish and English over who would control Northern Ireland that lasted about 30 years.
  • The UK’s economic slump in 1980-1 that led to riots
  • Margaret Thatcher’s policies led to unemployment and a housing crisis that persists to this day
  • The Falklands War
  • The Iran-Iraq War
  • Canada’s separation from England in 1982
  • Kwangju Massacre in South Korea following an uprising over military leader Commander General Chun Doo-Hwan declaring martial law and seizing control of the country. An estimated 600 people died.
  • Indira Gandhi’s assassination following Operation Blue Star, which lead to damage to the most sacred Sikh shrine and deaths of innocents
  • The Chechen Wars
  • The Rwandan Genocide
  • The Oka Crisis between Canada and the Mohawk nation in 1990
  • Afghanistan falling under Taliban rule in 1996
  • The LA Riots over the acquittal of four police officers by an all-white jury in the Rodney King police brutality case
  • The Somali Civil War

Feel free to add more.

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How the 1979 Iranian Revolution reflects today in American Society:

The cities of Iran were very Modernized and Westernized. Women went to universities, wore skirts, and everyone danced to Rock & Roll music, were watching Hollywood movies and becoming Artist and Designers. Iran today even has the largest collection of Modern Pop Art outside of North American and Europe.

But how did a country with women who had free hair, wore high heels, and a city that use to dance all night, turned “backwards”?

It was because of the Conservative Rights in the country. They felt like that the globalization of the western world was perverting their country. That the modern cities did not represent the common people, and they went to replace their country with the Radical and Religious Right, who was willing to reinstall national values back to the country.

There was no civil war, there was no financial crises, people’s rebellion or military take over that caused the revolution from a Pro-West Government, to a Religious Authoritarian. It was over an election of the Islamic Republic Party over the Freedom Movement.

They would shut down all media presses and censored them, that if the media was not on their side, they were the enemy. They crushed down feminist’s protest and opposition marches, and ordered religious ideas on women’s bodies and made wearing the Hijab mandatory. They expelled anything that was deemed foreign in the country, on the belief that it make Iran great again on Iranian traditional values. And they isolated their country from the rest of the world, all on a charismatic leader of immense popularity, Ruhollah Khomeini who became the leader of Iran.

100 Days of Trump Day 54: Spec Opts: The Line

Welcome back to 100 Days of Trump, where we try to explain WTF happened in 2016 through 100 recommendations, and this one is another one of those “hey I can’t really talk about this in full detail without going into spoiler territory so lets awkward talk about the plot without the specifics” deal cause GAH.  And this one is even worse than Chinatown because it is one of those “Hey the game looks like one thing but it is in fact something else”  

   So whatever, if you want to play the game, its a modern military shooter set in the middle east, go play it have fun.  Spoilers are going to be below, so otherwise look at the nice picture of a white dude with a gun, ignore the text below and come back when you’ve played it.  

   Ok, so this game is basically like the game equivalent of Mike Posner’s “I took a Pill in Ibiza” in terms of how fucking weird this game is, but to understand you kinda need to understand the gaming industry, in particular the take over of gaming by modern military shooters.  Now First Person Shooters have always been popular since the technology allowed it and they mostly came in two main styles, fantastical science fiction style shooting games in the vein of Half Life, Doom, Duke Nukem, Quake and later Halo and “realistic” historical shooters that focuses almost exclusively on WWII, your Battlefield, Metal of Honor, Spec Opts, and of course Call of Duty.    The former were over the top and absurd silly romps through fantastical adventures, and the latter are the main focus of what we are talking about.  

Half Life is sort of its own thing, shut up I’m making a point here.  

 So these WWII games are about shooting down waves and waves of Nazis in a very..uncomplicated way.  Despite having a gritty visual aesthetic, this is one of the most universally positive depictions of war you can find all of the little nastier element of erased.  The Nazis you kill are effectively robots cosplaying as SS soldiers, you never have to worry about civilians or collaborators, or prisoners who surrender in a meaningful way or war crimes or really any of the complexities of war, it has the filter of WWII over what is effectively a game about killing aliens.  

And this entire war game aethetic was basically accepted because you know…they are Nazis, fuck Nazis, Nazis are so evil that we don’t need to question the extreme pro war mentality. This was basically accepted because all of this military jingoism was applied to a time commonly imagined as absolute black and white good and evil, so nobody needs to really question the base assumptions going on.  

    And then Call of Duty 4 Happened, where the same gameplay was set in a modern wars on Terror.  And unlike all of the COD before or since, COD 4 didn’t fully embrace a jingoistic attitude, the game is more thoughtful than the series it spawned (that isn’t saying much) and has a marginally anti war message (in a confused contradictory not sure what I”m talking about any more sort of way).  But its massive popularity basically broke the taboo of combining shooting mechanics designed for an uncomplicated WWII power fantasy and inserted it into modern politics, and later games jumped on the bandwagon to insert the jingoism and mentality of the WWII games to modern warfare.  The results….well…. lets.. justsay …the results ….weren’t ….pretty

And when the military FPS power fantasy met the hyper macho multi player shooter community over real life politics, something remarkable happened…and by remarkable I mean totally expected.  A weird right wing narrative about the War on Terror emerged, like a contemporary Stabbed in the Back Theory.  Video games turned from a power fantasy of being an awesome solider who killed the bad guys into something a lot more insidious…the fantasy that America can actually win the War on Terror if we apply just a little bit more violence and military hardware to the situation, and if it wasn’t for those SJWs holding us back we could do it.  And this macho power fantasy took on even more uncomfortable tones.  And while not all CoD players were nationalists or even right wing, the culture and attitude of the gaming communities towards CoD allowed this to fester and grow into something far more dangerous. 

And this just kept getting worse and worse because CoD literally dominated the entire gaming industry becoming the best selling franchise ever so because corporations don’t actually understand how capitalism works, everything became a derivative of CoD, and what was a niche title turned into the default for gaming, and this attitude of nationalistic resentment mixed with power fantasy became full American style fascist propaganda, all racist propaganda, fetishization of the military.  (Skip to 0:45) 

And into this world came Spec:Opts the Line, which looks at first glance all the world like another CoD ripoff with an unquestioning mindless militaristic jingoism of a storyline about shooting arabs in the desert and AMERICA FUCK YEAH  And no….no it isn’t.  It really fucking isn’t.  The whole game is based upon an assumption you make about the story-line and then taking those preconceived assumptions and tearing them off and holding them before you to reveal them for the utter vile horror that they truly are.  Most critically the fact that modern warfare as a franchise is about being a hero without ever having to think critically about any of the unheroic shit that you are doing or the actual real life consequences of you’re actions.  Like the fact that when America actually jumps into a the middle east without any key idea of WTF they are doing and try to be heroes, they wind up murdering children.   

And that once you’ve made this core assumption, you kinda have to keep going, because admitting the original fault ruins the entire power fantasy you are going for, so you dig in deeper and delve in further to try to further rationalize you’re behavior in the hopes that the little “I’m a hero and all of my actions are vindicated please don’t judge me” reward is just over the next war crime.  And in once you go down this route to justify this fantasy you need to basically make yourself ok with more and more horrible behavior, because gods knows that always works.  And when you come out the other end, you are left with a choice, either admit that everything you did was not only morally abhorrent but also for nothing, or…sink into fantasy where you are justify.  And post 9/11 Trump is offering that fantasy, and many people are taking it, because if 2016 has taught us anything, land of the free and home of the brave can always be expected to march to the tune of moral cowardice if you wrap a flag around it. 

   There is a great temptation to not think about important issues that we really need to think about, to want to have the fun of War without considering the dangerous realities of War and the actual hardship of being a hero.  Maybe this is my protestant upbringing talking, but let me make something clear.  Nothing is simple and if you get success in a way that is easy, it likely is coming at the expense of another’s blood.  But hard truths are never popular and most would rather retreat into the fantasy of military glory rather than the reality of a complicated dangerous world without clear simple answers.  

Part 2

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The Cubist Garden of Villa Noailles in Hyères, France by Gabriel Guévrékian [1926]. The architect was an ethic Armenian from Constantinople [now Istanbul] who was raised in Tehran and studied in Vienna. This combination of east and west had a profound impact on his architectural style. Here he clashed what he learned in Vienna and Paris, cubism and bauhaus, with the architecture he saw growing up, the paradisiacal concept of the Persian garden. The word paradise itself comes from the Old Persian term for a walled enclosure or garden. 

The villa Noailles features as one of the very first modernist style buildings constructed in France. Designed in December 1923, the original villa was built for Charles and Marie-Laure de Noailles by the architect Rob Mallet-Stevens and exhibits the founding tenets of the rationalist movement: practicality, a purification of decorative features, roofs, terraces, light, hygiene… The extensions, which continued right up until 1933, along with the exceptional development of the surrounding property (courtyard and gardens), turned a modest holiday home into a true 1800m2, immobile ocean liner: fifteen master bedrooms all with en-suite bathrooms, a swimming pool, a squash court, a hairdressing salon, a resident gym instructor, etc.

Features such as the clocks, which are all controlled by a central system, the retracting bay-windows and the mirrored windows, all contribute to the modernity of the site. A heliotropic house, overlooking the bay of Hyères, the villa Noailles celebrated a new lifestyle which favoured body and nature. The interior decoration called upon an impressive list of prominent figures: Louis Barillet for the stain glass windows, Pierre Chareau, Eileen Gray, Djo-Bourgeois, and Francis Jourdain for the furniture, Gabriel Guévrékian for the cubist garden, and Mondrian, Henri Laurens, Jacques Lipchitz, Constantin Brancusi, and Alberto Giacometti for the art works.

Liberal feminists on the burqini ban (rightly so): The burqini ban is bad! A woman should be allowed to cover herself as much as she wants or reveal as much as she wants! Forcibly making someone remove their clothing in public is sexual harassment!

Liberal feminists on enforced hijab on female chess competitors in Iran: *crickets* Uh… when in Rome do as the Romans do… it’s just showing respect for their culture… Uh… Islam is a beautiful religion?

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The Cubist Garden of Villa Noailles in Hyères, France by Gabriel Guévrékian [1926]. The architect was an ethic Armenian from Constantinople [now Istanbul] who was raised in Tehran and studied in Vienna. This combination of east and west had a profound impact on his architectural style. Here he clashed what he learned in Vienna and Paris, cubism and bauhaus, with the architecture he saw growing up, the paradisiacal concept of the Persian garden. The word paradise itself comes from the Old Persian term for a walled enclosure or garden.

The villa Noailles features as one of the very first modernist style buildings constructed in France. Designed in December 1923, the original villa was built for Charles and Marie-Laure de Noailles by the architect Rob Mallet-Stevens and exhibits the founding tenets of the rationalist movement: practicality, a purification of decorative features, roofs, terraces, light, hygiene… The extensions, which continued right up until 1933, along with the exceptional development of the surrounding property (courtyard and gardens), turned a modest holiday home into a true 1800m2, immobile ocean liner: fifteen master bedrooms all with en-suite bathrooms, a swimming pool, a squash court, a hairdressing salon, a resident gym instructor, etc.

Features such as the clocks, which are all controlled by a central system, the retracting bay-windows and the mirrored windows, all contribute to the modernity of the site. A heliotropic house, overlooking the bay of Hyères, the villa Noailles celebrated a new lifestyle which favoured body and nature. The interior decoration called upon an impressive list of prominent figures: Louis Barillet for the stain glass windows, Pierre Chareau, Eileen Gray, Djo-Bourgeois, and Francis Jourdain for the furniture, Gabriel Guévrékian for the cubist garden, and Mondrian, Henri Laurens, Jacques Lipchitz, Constantin Brancusi, and Alberto Giacometti for the art works.

Pre-Islamic Iran was Zoroastrian for well over 1,000 years

The basic tenants of Zoroastrianism are “good deeds, good thoughts, and good words”. Zoroastrianism was the religion of the three Persian empires of Achaemenid, Parthian, and Sasanian Empire, which ruled modern-day Iran from 550BCE to 651CE, at which point the newly born Islamic Caliphate attacked Iran. The Muslim conquests consisted of forced conversions, but there were also voluntary conversions, and in many cases people were persuaded to convert because of political benefits of becoming Muslim. Today, a small, but growing Zoroastrian community exists around the world, with the largest concentrations being in India, Iran, and the United States. 

blownwish-blog replied to your post: avaritiabonaest: Desert dwelling people in FMA…

I always wondered how xerxes could be a desert country if the people are blonde and pale. weird

also let’s not forget that Xerxes is a Persian name, which equates to modern day Iran and parts of West Asia so like.  Yeah I can see the blonde/gold if you’re going for a Symbolic Aesthetic™ with the gold, but at least make their skin darker!!!  U CAN GO DARKER AND GO WITH THE GOLDEN UNDERTONES!!!

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The Afshar House in Tehran by Ali Akbar Saremi [1976]. The architectural style displays Bauhaus tendencies. Its curved corners enter transitional spaces and exit, adding sensuality to the dynamic of the villa and creating a distinct flowing pattern. Thus, the walls serve to guide the inhabitant rather than as divisions. Large windows illuminate open spaces dissolving the rigid nature of the brick. The style of brick used coincides with bauhaus and traditional Iranian architecture. Both the colour and dimensions have been used from Sassanid Empire to Parthia to the Qajar dynasty. 

In the Zoroastrian tradition, once a body ceases to live, it can immediately be contaminated by demons and made impure. In addition, the possibly-impure bodies could not be touched by earth or fire, both considered sacred. So burial or cremation were out. Zoroastrians solved the issue exposing the dead body to the elements and local carrion birds on top of flat-topped towers in the desert called dakhmas. With modernization in Iran, and dakmas illegal since the 1970s, some Zoroastrians have taken to burying their dead surrounded by concrete, which keeps the bodies from impurities and from touching sacred earth.