investigation

On the trail of the Father Crespi Collection – Part I

Father Crespi is now known for his care and kindness of the poor people of Cuenca, Ecuador. What is not known is the whereabouts of archaeological pieces seemingly missing from a collection of impressive and valuable artifacts amassed by the priest. The mystery led German author Walter J. Langbein to Cuenca, to try to uncover the missing collection of Father Crespi.

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elderofziyon.blogspot.com
Mortars from terror group killed 13 Palestinians in Rafah in a single incident ~ Elder Of Ziyon - Israel News

As the IDF investigation that was just released says:

The factual findings and the material collated by the FFA Mechanism and presented to the MAG indicate that no attack – aerial or otherwise – that could have resulted in a strike on the family as alleged was carried out by IDF forces in the area in question and on the relevant date. The FFA Mechanism also ruled out the possibility that the types of munition described in a number of the reports had been utilized.

Nonetheless, it was found that at the relevant time, and in close proximity to the Siyam family’s residence, terror organizations in the Gaza Strip fired a series of mortars, aimed at the territory of the State of Israel. A number of these launches were “failed launches”, wherein the mortar shells that were aimed at Israeli territory, fell within the territory of the Gaza Strip. Images showing the points of impact of the munitions that struck the Siyam family and the surroundings of their residence, which were provided to Israel by one of the organizations and transferred to the FFA Mechanism for examination, also indicate that the strike in question was not caused as the result of an aerial attack as alleged in the majority of the reports. The FFA Mechanism and the MAG Corps made representations to the legal representative of the organization which had claimed that the strike on the Siyam family had been caused by IDF munitions, in order for them to present evidence that would support such an allegation. These representations did not receive a response.

After reviewing the factual findings and the material collated by the FFA Mechanism, the MAG found, that contrary to the allegations, it could be concluded, with reasonable certainty, that the members of the Siyam family were not harmed as a result of IDF activity.

Notice how much the IDF did to investigate this. Besides painstakingly cataloging all its strikes from planes, drones and tanks, it also managed to gather photographs of the damage, calculating the trajectories that must have created the types of damage seen and correlating them with its own separate evidence of mortar and rocket fire that were shot from Gaza. No news organization or NGO has the capability to do anything close to this, and it is easier for them to flatly blame Israel rather than even consider that the strike came from the many terror groups who wantonly shot rockets and mortars by the thousands during the war - even though there have been many documented cases of Gaza casualties from Hamas and Islamic Jihad rockets in that war and previous ones.

It appears that the organization that made the legal complaint against Israel that did not respond to requests for more information that would buttress its blaming Israel was the Al Mezan Center.

Losing Their Spark |Pidge| Chapter 1|‘Invest’| Open

After yesterday’s overwhelming endeavor, and the scuffle to find bandages, it was hard to tell what Pidge felt. They weren’t in the kitchen investigating or wisecracking while eating Aria’s stolen cookies, and they weren’t in the halls looming around.

You’d think by now, maybe, they found a way to escape? Perhaps they were the murderer? It could’ve made sense if you twisted their actions around. Alas, it wasn’t clear to even them.

It was so confusing to find them go-

Oh, wait, there they were. 

Pidge was sandwiched between a chair in the corner and a table that seemed impossible to get to unless, conveniently, you were their size. Their expression was complicated but there was a sense of callousness and anxiety that made you want to look away. Do you approach?

This morning my boyfriend called me and told me his best friend had died. Expressing my condolences, utterly confused, I went on to ask him what had happened. He then informed me that his goldfish, Jamal, had been found floating lifeless in the bottom of his bowl this morning. He and his twin brother proceeded to have a proper funeral and conduct a full investigation complete with caution tape. They’re 17. I am now more certain than ever that I’m going to marry this boy.

The Women Working in NYC's Nail Salons Are Treated More Terribly Than You Can Imagine

About four years ago, I was at a 24-hour spa in Koreatown. It’s one of the Vogue top-secret best-bet salons—a really unusual place. It was my birthday, and I treated myself to a pedicure at 10 AM. And I said to the woman, “It’s so crazy that this is a 24-hour salon. Who works the night shift?” And she says, “I work the night shift.” And I said, “Well, it’s daytime. Who works the day shift? What do you mean?”

And she said, “I work six days a week, 24 hours a day, I live in a barracks above the salon, and on the seventh day, I go home to sleep in my bedroom in Flushing, and then I come right back to work.”

And I was like, This woman’s in prison. People had to shake her to keep her awake. And then she would do a treatment. I just thought it was crazy.

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In immaculate greenhouses, Mexican laborers are ordered to use hand sanitizers and schooled in how to pamper the produce. They’re required to keep their fingernails carefully trimmed so the fruit will arrive unblemished in U.S. supermarkets.

The produce may live in luxury, but those harvesting it live in squalor. A Los Angeles Times investigation found many workers are held against their will. Those who attempt to escape are beaten.

Do you know where your food comes from?

Photos by Don Bartletti.

Okay so I was playing Tokyo Ghoul Carnaval and I got this Quinque

I find it strange because it reminds me of Tsukiyama’s Kagune

HOLY SH*T DON’T TELL ME! 

IS TSUKIYAMA GONNA DIE IN TOKYO GHOUL:RE AND BECOME A QUINQUE?!

CUZ CURRENTLY THE CCG IS INVESTIGATING ROSEWALD AND IT WILL LEAD THEM TO THE TSUKIYAMA FAMILY AND THEY’LL POSSIBLY DESTROY AND KILL EVERYBODY 

Cuz Chie predicted:

Where did the money go? An NPR and Propublica investigation has raised troubling questions about what happened to the hundreds of millions of dollars raised by the American Red Cross for earthquake relief in Haiti.

Goats and Soda posed a few questions to NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan about her work on this investigation:

What made you decide to look into the American Red Cross’s earthquake recovery spending in Haiti?

I spent a lot of time last fall with Justin Elliott and Jesse Eisinger from ProPublica looking at some of the problems the American Red Cross ran into in their disaster response to Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Isaac and found the charity had put this inordinate focus on public relations that really hurt their effort to provide disaster relief. We found in one case the Red Cross diverted 40 percent of its emergency vehicles to press conferences and in another case drove empty trucks around to make it appear as though services were being delivered. After those stories, we started to hear from people about things that went down in Haiti. At the same time we started noticing that the numbers they were giving the public about how they spent donors’ money didn’t make sense. Since then the Red Cross has changed the language it uses around those figures. So with that in mind, we really started looking at the spending the Red Cross did in Haiti.

Behind The Story: What Made NPR Look Into Red Cross Efforts In Haiti?

Photo: After the quake of 2010, a man stands on a rooftop yelling out for any sign of his missing relatives in a Port au Prince neighborhood. Photo credit: David Gilkey/NPR

What’s On Board the Next SpaceX Cargo Launch?

Cargo and supplies are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Monday, July 18 at 12:45 a.m. EDT. The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will liftoff from our Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Among the arriving cargo is the first of two international docking adapters, which will allow commercial spacecraft to dock to the station when transporting astronauts in the near future as part of our Commercial Crew Program.

This metallic ring, big enough for astronauts and cargo to fit through represents the first on-orbit element built to the docking measurements that are standardized for all the spacecraft builders across the world.

Its first users are expected to be the Boeing Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft, which are both now in development.

What About the Science?!

Experiments launching to the station range from research into the effects of microgravity on the human body, to regulating temperature on spacecraft. Take a look at a few:

A Space-based DNA Sequencer

DNA testing aboard the space station typically requires collecting samples and sending them back to Earth to be analyzed. Our Biomolecule Sequencer Investigation will test a new device that will allow DNA sequencing in space for the first time! The samples in this first test will be DNA from a virus, a bacteria and a mouse.

How big is it? Picture your smartphone…then cut it in half. This miniature device has the potential to identify microbes, diagnose diseases and evaluate crew member health, and even help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.

OsteoOmics

OsteoOmics is an experiment that will investigate the molecular mechanisms that dictate bone loss in microgravity. It does this by examining osteoblasts, which form bone; and osteoclasts, which dissolves bone. New ground-based studies are using magnetic levitation equipment to simulate gravity-related changes. This experiment hopes to validate whether this method accurately simulates the free-fall conditions of microgravity.

Results from this study could lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss, both on Earth and in space!

Heart Cells Experiment

The goals of the Effects of Microgravity on Stem Cell-Derived Heart Cells (Heart Cells) investigation include increasing the understanding of the effects of microgravity on heart function, the improvement of heart disease modeling capabilities and the development of appropriate methods for cell therapy for people with heart disease on Earth.

Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger (PCM HX)

The goal of the Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger (PCM HX) project is to regulate internal spacecraft temperatures. Inside this device, we’re testing the freezing and thawing of material in an attempt to regulate temperature on a spacecraft. This phase-changing material (PCM) can be melted and solidified at certain high heat temperatures to store and release large amounts of energy.

Watch Launch!

Live coverage of the SpaceX launch will be available starting at 11:30 p.m. EDT on Sunday, July 17 via NASA Television

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

This much is known:
the thread you never
let go of
guided you back.
And when you emerged,
years later, light
hurt your eyes.
Blood on your rusted
blade was dry.

But what happened
in the labyrinth?
In deepest dark
you grappled,
felt its breath
on your face,
stabbed,
and fled.

                A monster?
Wouldn’t anything
cry like that,
pierced to the heart?

Gregory Orr, “Investigation,” in City of Salt

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The U.S. Army has kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers since 2009 for “misconduct,” after they returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and were diagnosed with mental health disorders and traumatic brain injuries. That means many of those soldiers are not receiving the crucial treatment or retirement and health care benefits they would have received with an honorable discharge.

The Army has taken these actions despite a 2009 federal law designed to ensure that troops whose mental illness might be linked to the wars aren’t cast aside.

That’s the finding of a joint investigation by NPR and Colorado Public Radio that listened to hours of secret recordings, looked at hundreds of pages of confidential military documents and interviewed dozens of sources both inside and outside the base.

One of the Army’s top officials who oversee mental health, Lt. Col. Chris Ivany, told NPR and CPR that the Army is not violating the spirit of the 2009 law by dismissing those soldiers for misconduct.

He says the soldiers’ “functional impairment was not severe” enough in some cases to affect their judgment. In other cases, the soldiers’ disorders might have been serious when they were diagnosed, but their “condition subsequently improved” before they committed misconduct — so they can’t blame the war for causing them to misbehave.

NPR and CPR also obtained the soldiers’ records, with their permission, and asked three independent psychiatrists to review them. Two of those psychiatrists served as top medical officers in the military. All three say that based on the records they saw, they would have advised the Army not to kick out these soldiers for misconduct.

“Especially for our soldiers who are coming back, not just with post-traumatic stress disorder, but with traumatic brain injury and other wounds, I really think that we as a society need to take that into account,” says Col. Elspeth Ritchie, who served as the Army’s top adviser on mental health during some of the worst fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. “I think as a society, they deserve to have us do everything we can to support them. I absolutely would want them to get the benefit of the doubt.”

Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

Photos (from top): Eric James with his mother, Beverly Morris, and father, Robert James. Eric secretly recorded more than 20 hours of sessions he had with behavioral health specialists and Army officials; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio. James Vanni, at his home in Colorado Springs, Colo. Vanni was dismissed from the Army without benefits; Theo Stroomer for NPR. Larry Morrison, who is appealing the Army’s decision to dismiss him for misconduct; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

“The Deep Web” sounds like a bullshit term some cop show made up for its hacker character to say (“The serial killer’s firewall has breached our Javascript! We have to backtrace him before he escapes into the Deep Web!”), but it turns out it is a real thing. Specifically, it’s a hidden (that is, not indexed by search engines) part of the Web in which the sites are protected by passwords and where membership is often by invitation only. So, who uses it? Some drug dealers, but, mostly, it’s pedophiles. Lots and lots of pedophiles.

Our source, “Pam”, spent months undercover in an online community of child molesters, learning their lingo and studying their ways as part of an undergrad research project. The evidence she brought back is truly horrifying, and a quick heads up: Nothing that appears after this paragraph will be the least bit safe for your brain.

5 Things I Learned Infiltrating Deep Web Child Molesters

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In secret chemical weapons experiments conducted during World War II, the U.S. military exposed thousands of American troops to mustard gas.

When those experiments were formally declassified in the 1990s, the Department of Veterans Affairs made two promises: to locate about 4,000 men who were used in the most extreme tests, and to compensate those who had permanent injuries.

But the VA didn’t uphold those promises, an NPR investigation has found.

NPR interviewed more than 40 living test subjects and family members, and they describe an unending cycle of appeals and denials as they struggled to get government benefits for mustard gas exposure. Some gave up out of frustration.

In more than 20 years, the VA attempted to reach just 610 of the men, with a single letter sent in the mail. Brad Flohr, a VA senior adviser for benefits, says the agency couldn’t find the rest, because military records of the experiments were incomplete.

“There was no identifying information,” he says. “No Social Security numbers, no addresses, no … way of identifying them. Although, we tried.”

Yet in just two months, an NPR research librarian located more than 1,200 of them, using the VA’s own list of test subjects and public records.

The VA’s Broken Promise To Thousands Of Vets Exposed To Mustard Gas

Photo credits: (Top) Courtesy of Edgewood Arsenal; (center) Naval Research Laboratory; (bottom) Kristian Thacker for NPR