This morning my boyfriend called me and told me his best friend had died. Expressing my condolences, utterly confused, I went on to ask him what had happened. He then informed me that his goldfish, Jamal, had been found floating lifeless in the bottom of his bowl this morning. He and his twin brother proceeded to have a proper funeral and conduct a full investigation complete with caution tape. They’re 17. I am now more certain than ever that I’m going to marry this boy.

The Women Working in NYC's Nail Salons Are Treated More Terribly Than You Can Imagine

About four years ago, I was at a 24-hour spa in Koreatown. It’s one of the Vogue top-secret best-bet salons—a really unusual place. It was my birthday, and I treated myself to a pedicure at 10 AM. And I said to the woman, “It’s so crazy that this is a 24-hour salon. Who works the night shift?” And she says, “I work the night shift.” And I said, “Well, it’s daytime. Who works the day shift? What do you mean?”

And she said, “I work six days a week, 24 hours a day, I live in a barracks above the salon, and on the seventh day, I go home to sleep in my bedroom in Flushing, and then I come right back to work.”

And I was like, This woman’s in prison. People had to shake her to keep her awake. And then she would do a treatment. I just thought it was crazy.

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In immaculate greenhouses, Mexican laborers are ordered to use hand sanitizers and schooled in how to pamper the produce. They’re required to keep their fingernails carefully trimmed so the fruit will arrive unblemished in U.S. supermarkets.

The produce may live in luxury, but those harvesting it live in squalor. A Los Angeles Times investigation found many workers are held against their will. Those who attempt to escape are beaten.

Do you know where your food comes from?

Photos by Don Bartletti.

Okay so I was playing Tokyo Ghoul Carnaval and I got this Quinque

I find it strange because it reminds me of Tsukiyama’s Kagune




Cuz Chie predicted:

Where did the money go? An NPR and Propublica investigation has raised troubling questions about what happened to the hundreds of millions of dollars raised by the American Red Cross for earthquake relief in Haiti.

Goats and Soda posed a few questions to NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan about her work on this investigation:

What made you decide to look into the American Red Cross’s earthquake recovery spending in Haiti?

I spent a lot of time last fall with Justin Elliott and Jesse Eisinger from ProPublica looking at some of the problems the American Red Cross ran into in their disaster response to Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Isaac and found the charity had put this inordinate focus on public relations that really hurt their effort to provide disaster relief. We found in one case the Red Cross diverted 40 percent of its emergency vehicles to press conferences and in another case drove empty trucks around to make it appear as though services were being delivered. After those stories, we started to hear from people about things that went down in Haiti. At the same time we started noticing that the numbers they were giving the public about how they spent donors’ money didn’t make sense. Since then the Red Cross has changed the language it uses around those figures. So with that in mind, we really started looking at the spending the Red Cross did in Haiti.

Behind The Story: What Made NPR Look Into Red Cross Efforts In Haiti?

Photo: After the quake of 2010, a man stands on a rooftop yelling out for any sign of his missing relatives in a Port au Prince neighborhood. Photo credit: David Gilkey/NPR

What’s On Board the Next SpaceX Cargo Launch?

Cargo and supplies are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Monday, July 18 at 12:45 a.m. EDT. The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will liftoff from our Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Among the arriving cargo is the first of two international docking adapters, which will allow commercial spacecraft to dock to the station when transporting astronauts in the near future as part of our Commercial Crew Program.

This metallic ring, big enough for astronauts and cargo to fit through represents the first on-orbit element built to the docking measurements that are standardized for all the spacecraft builders across the world.

Its first users are expected to be the Boeing Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft, which are both now in development.

What About the Science?!

Experiments launching to the station range from research into the effects of microgravity on the human body, to regulating temperature on spacecraft. Take a look at a few:

A Space-based DNA Sequencer

DNA testing aboard the space station typically requires collecting samples and sending them back to Earth to be analyzed. Our Biomolecule Sequencer Investigation will test a new device that will allow DNA sequencing in space for the first time! The samples in this first test will be DNA from a virus, a bacteria and a mouse.

How big is it? Picture your smartphone…then cut it in half. This miniature device has the potential to identify microbes, diagnose diseases and evaluate crew member health, and even help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.


OsteoOmics is an experiment that will investigate the molecular mechanisms that dictate bone loss in microgravity. It does this by examining osteoblasts, which form bone; and osteoclasts, which dissolves bone. New ground-based studies are using magnetic levitation equipment to simulate gravity-related changes. This experiment hopes to validate whether this method accurately simulates the free-fall conditions of microgravity.

Results from this study could lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss, both on Earth and in space!

Heart Cells Experiment

The goals of the Effects of Microgravity on Stem Cell-Derived Heart Cells (Heart Cells) investigation include increasing the understanding of the effects of microgravity on heart function, the improvement of heart disease modeling capabilities and the development of appropriate methods for cell therapy for people with heart disease on Earth.

Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger (PCM HX)

The goal of the Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger (PCM HX) project is to regulate internal spacecraft temperatures. Inside this device, we’re testing the freezing and thawing of material in an attempt to regulate temperature on a spacecraft. This phase-changing material (PCM) can be melted and solidified at certain high heat temperatures to store and release large amounts of energy.

Watch Launch!

Live coverage of the SpaceX launch will be available starting at 11:30 p.m. EDT on Sunday, July 17 via NASA Television

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space:


The U.S. Army has kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers since 2009 for “misconduct,” after they returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and were diagnosed with mental health disorders and traumatic brain injuries. That means many of those soldiers are not receiving the crucial treatment or retirement and health care benefits they would have received with an honorable discharge.

The Army has taken these actions despite a 2009 federal law designed to ensure that troops whose mental illness might be linked to the wars aren’t cast aside.

That’s the finding of a joint investigation by NPR and Colorado Public Radio that listened to hours of secret recordings, looked at hundreds of pages of confidential military documents and interviewed dozens of sources both inside and outside the base.

One of the Army’s top officials who oversee mental health, Lt. Col. Chris Ivany, told NPR and CPR that the Army is not violating the spirit of the 2009 law by dismissing those soldiers for misconduct.

He says the soldiers’ “functional impairment was not severe” enough in some cases to affect their judgment. In other cases, the soldiers’ disorders might have been serious when they were diagnosed, but their “condition subsequently improved” before they committed misconduct — so they can’t blame the war for causing them to misbehave.

NPR and CPR also obtained the soldiers’ records, with their permission, and asked three independent psychiatrists to review them. Two of those psychiatrists served as top medical officers in the military. All three say that based on the records they saw, they would have advised the Army not to kick out these soldiers for misconduct.

“Especially for our soldiers who are coming back, not just with post-traumatic stress disorder, but with traumatic brain injury and other wounds, I really think that we as a society need to take that into account,” says Col. Elspeth Ritchie, who served as the Army’s top adviser on mental health during some of the worst fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. “I think as a society, they deserve to have us do everything we can to support them. I absolutely would want them to get the benefit of the doubt.”

Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

Photos (from top): Eric James with his mother, Beverly Morris, and father, Robert James. Eric secretly recorded more than 20 hours of sessions he had with behavioral health specialists and Army officials; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio. James Vanni, at his home in Colorado Springs, Colo. Vanni was dismissed from the Army without benefits; Theo Stroomer for NPR. Larry Morrison, who is appealing the Army’s decision to dismiss him for misconduct; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

This much is known:
the thread you never
let go of
guided you back.
And when you emerged,
years later, light
hurt your eyes.
Blood on your rusted
blade was dry.

But what happened
in the labyrinth?
In deepest dark
you grappled,
felt its breath
on your face,
and fled.

                A monster?
Wouldn’t anything
cry like that,
pierced to the heart?

Gregory Orr, “Investigation,” in City of Salt

espionage.| listen. 52min.
 For those who carry the film noir excense, blending amongst the citizens and shadowed alleyways, heart breakers with guns hidden under trench coats, eyes covered by the cold fog and secrets that invite them into violent missions;

001. lurk by the neighbourhood | 002. iron by woodkid | 003. gun by elenika | 004. hudson by vampire weekend | 005. don’t worry, we’ll be watching you by gotye | 006. angel by massive attack | 007. who are you, really? by mikky ekko | 008. this is a trick by crosses | 009. warrior rmx. by magic wands | 010. the mission mix. by puscifer | 011. back to black by beyoncé & andré 3000 | 012. this is not a love song by katie cruel | 013. glory box by portishead | 014. immigrant song by karen o.


Let’s begin with a choice.

Say there’s a check in the mail. It’s meant to help you run your household. You can use it to keep the lights on, the water running and food on the table. Would you rather that check be for $9,794 or $28,639?

It’s not a trick question. It’s the story of America’s schools in two numbers.

That $9,794 is how much money the Chicago Ridge School District in Illinois spent per child in 2013 (the number has been adjusted by Education Week to account for regional cost differences). It’s well below that year’s national average of $11,841.

Why America’s Schools Have A Money Problem

Map: Alyson Hurt and Katie Park/NPR
Illustration: LA Johnson/NPR
Photo: Tim Lloyd/St. Louis Public Radio


Since 2006, there have been more than 200 mass killings in the United States.

Well-known images from Newtown, Aurora and Virginia Tech capture the nation’s attention, but similar bloody scenes happen with alarming frequency and much less scrutiny.

We examined FBI data – which defines a mass killing as four or more victims – as well as local police records and media reports to understand mass killings in America. They happen far more often than the government reports, and the circumstances of those killings – the people who commit them, the weapons they use and the forces that motivate them – are far more predictable than many might think.

Yet no one is keeping track.

A USA TODAY special report – learn more: