invasive species

In Washington State killing Bigfoot is a felony but in Texas Bigfoot is considered an invasive species and can be hunted at will.

This sounds like one of those cutesy funny cryptid posts but that is actually the legal status of Bigfoot in those two states, you can look it up.

I have been invaded by Starlings today, and it resulted in a TON of pictures. This is a glimpse. I never knew a bird tongue could look like this. It is like there is a middle “beak layer”. I present to you - a Starling Tongue. Can an ornithologist confirm that this what it is supposed to look like and it is not like the Starling has a piece of his tongue frozen or something?

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Here is another member of the genus, Rubus that provides delicious berries to pick. While this plant produces tasty berries and has lovely blooms for the pollinators, it is a ruthless invader from India that has overtaken many native plant communities across the Pacific Northwest. Himalayan Blackberry (Rubus Discolor) is a widespread invasive species that creates dense thickets of thorny brambles along roadsides and in clearings. I have observed this plant out-competing countless native species including other berry-producing brambles such as blackcap raspberry.

Watersipora Wednesday! Here two opalescent nudibranchs crawl over the invasive bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. 

Watersipora, the rust-colored, lobed mass pictured here, is an invasive genus of bryozoan – or aquatic filter feeding invertebrates – that has taken up residence in and around the sanctuary. Though there’s still much to learn about how these organisms grow and thrive, Watersipora are thought to have been introduced to the California coast by hitching a ride on ships and boats traveling along the coastline. 

These bryozoans have proven difficult to control because research shows they can be resistant to antifouling paints commonly used to prevent attachment of aquatic organisms to the hulls of ships. Once settled in a new environment, Watersipora can have damaging effects on native invertebrate species, smothering them and outcompeting them for space. But researchers at Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary have been working hard to understand how these organisms grow and thrive, and what ecological consequences we can anticipate from their spread. 

(Photo: Steve Lonhart/NOAA)

Save the bees!

Honey nut cheerios is running a “save the bees” campaign. If you google it, they’ll send you wildflower seeds! Im super excited for flowers!!!

::edit::

Just a reminder, check to make sure the flowers are not an invasive species in your area! I know where I live, all the species are safe to plant, but do a quick google search and double check!

The Crustacean Invasion: European green crabs are native to western Europe and northwest Africa, but have invaded ecosystems in every continent but Antarctica. 

Because they disperse over long distances during their larval stage and aren’t exactly picky eaters (these crabs will eat clams, shrimp, and other invertebrates!), European green crabs are quite successful at invading new territories. Where they establish new populations, these crabs threaten shellfish fisheries and ecosystem health. 

For reasons not yet well known, European green crabs have been particularly successful in Seadrift Lagoon, a manmade lagoon near San Francisco that is tidally linked to Bolinas Lagoon. There, they’ve established the largest West Coast concentration in a closed marine ecosystem! But folks at Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary are hard at work removing these invasive crabs. Since 2009, teams have worked to remove tens of thousands of crabs from the lagoon, and their work continues. 

(Photo: Kate Bimrose/NOAA) 

anonymous asked:

Imagine aliens reaction to a human literally laughing in the face of danger. Just, GIANT SPACE MONSTER THING and all the human does is laugh while it loads its rifle. Band of space pirates and one is asking for the human as a bride because of reasons, "pfft, no."

Yussep had faced many dangers. The Falls of Chaos, the race of creatures known only as Devourers. Each time he had barely escaped with his life. But nothing–NOTHING– scared him more than humans. Yussep and Mari had been travelling together on this hell planet for almost two years, long after his species invasion had ended. Poorly. The earth had all but destroyed their entire fleet, so they’d retreated, leaving Yussep alone. Mari had always been scary, but this…. now she was downright terrifying.

She had faced a Many Faced Night Crawler, from a planet no ship could get near. The Night Crawlers were the ultimate killing machines. Fast, strong, AND smart. The ultimate combo. So when a legion had landed on Earth, Yussep prepared to say goodbye to his new home. He and Mari had been passing by chance when the fleet had landed. He’d tried to warn her, tried to drag her away. Over their time together he had grown bonded with her. But Mari wrenched her arm from his grasp. When she spoke it was little more than a feral growl.

“They picked the wrong planet. I am done with these damn aliens always invading my damn planet. ” she stormed towards the fleet, looking impossibly tiny agaisnt their war ships, her dark skin barely registering againt the midnight black hull. Yussep quietly mourned his friend as he followed behind, his brain screaming at him to run, to do the logical thing as he always had. But compared to the night crawlers, Mari was a kitten.

And she had just walked into a wolf pack.

He couldnt leave her. Not now. He would die by her side. Together to the end, just like he promised. He winced as the mighty black doors opened with a hiss. But Mari planted herself in front of them, hands on her hips, staring up defiantly as the first night crawler set foot on the Earth.

He’s never seen one so close. They were huge. Towering nearly 12 feet above Mari, their skin was living shadow. Not just dark, as he had been lead to believe. These creatures were MADE of shadows, swirling together, whispering, stretching out in dangerous vines. Blood red eyes glowed like xarax engines. Dear stars. They would not survive this. Not even Mari. The beast lowered its head, taking in Mari’s stubborn form. She lifted her head, taking a deep breath as she shouted,

“FUCK OFF, THIS IS YOUR ONE AND ONLY WARNING!!” The beast cocked its head, its face splitting apart to reveal rows of jagged teeth, razor sharp, perfect for shredding soft flesh. They were so, sooo dead. Mari took one look at those teeth…and laughed. She threw her head back and howled into the sky.

“ it’s like a frickin cheese grater!”

Mari switched from terrifying, to horrifying.

Without another word, still laughing, Mari launched herself towards the beasts lowered head. She grasped it firmly by its hearing appendeges, drawing her knife from her side.

“Ha! Too late for you, pal,” she raked her blade across its exposed throat in one smooth movement, fury blazing in her eyes. The beast fell and melted into shadows that sunk into the ground. Mari turned and bared her teeth at the fleet. Yussep could only watch as Mari raised her arms in triumph, in challenge.

And the undefeatable Night crawler fleet promptly took to the skies, fleeing as quickly as they dared. Mari watched them go before turning to Yussep with blood splattered on her face and a wicked gleam in her eye.

“Seems they were smarter than you idiots,”

Yussep couldnt agree more.

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The kea is beautiful, intelligent, hilarirous..and in serious trouble.  In the last decade kea numbers have plummeted, and there are many reasons why.  Like many New Zealand species, the kea has been greatly affected by invasive mammalian predators such as rats, stoats, and possums.  A study has shown that only about two thirds of kea chicks survive to fledging due to nest raids by these predators.  Unfortunately, government efforts to eradicate these creatures are also affecting the kea, as the curious birds will often consume poisoned bait and be caught in traps.  

The kea’s curiosity and intelligence may also work against it.  Many kea have died from lead poisoning, as they will chew on the roofs and gutters of old buildings, which often contain lead.  In addition, chewing on buildings and cars leads kea into increasing conflict with humans.

Humans are deeply divided in their opinion about the kea, and both of them can be harmful.  Many people love the kea, and travel to the national parks just to see them.  These same people, however, charmed by the kea’s fearlessness, will feed them unsuitable and harmful foods such as chips, ice cream, and chocolate.  This also encourages the kea to seek out people, which can lead them to approach those on the other side of the spectrum.  For other humans consider the kea a terrible nuisance due to its attacks on sheep and destructive nature.  Despite protection by the government, many locals still actively hunt and shoot kea.

There may be as few as 1000 kea left in the wild.

Happy Memorial Day! 

Today we celebrate those men and women who have bravely given their lives for our nation. A recent research expedition to Midway Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument commemorated the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway and honored the legacy of the brave men who helped turn the tide in the Pacific during the battle. 

Scientists explored sunken aircraft associated with the battle, adding an important maritime heritage component to our understanding of the broader history of World War II in the Pacific. They also investigated the role shipwrecks and debris may play in harboring invasive species in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Here, diver Brian Hauk sets an invasive species quadrat on the stern of the USS Macaw

(Image courtesy of Brett Seymour, Exploring the Sunken Heritage of Midway Atoll expedition)

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We’ve been going out of our way to pick out the invasive Spanish slugs (Arion vulgaris) for our ducks, leaving the native species alone.

In this video my partner and I are feeding the ducks a full half kilo of slugs. He’s speaking Danish, but I’ve added translations in the captions.

I was gifted a praying mantis egg case by my secret santa. It’s a very thoughtful, awesome gift, but… 

1.) I have no way of knowing what species it’s from.
2.) I have never seen a praying mantis here and don’t know if they’re indigenous to the area.

When the babies hatch, there will be hundreds of them. What am I supposed to do? I can’t raise more than one to adulthood in captivity in my current living situation, and I don’t want to release a potentially invasive species. Should I just… keep them contained and let them eat each other until only one remains? Kill most of them? Find some way to ship them to someone in an area where they’re indigenous and have them release them?

help I have too many insect babies