interpol*

indie make out session

Say Yes - Elliott Smith

Just One Thing - My Morning Jacket

Sweet Child o’ Mine - Taken By Trees

I’d Rather Dance With You (Radio Mix) - Kings of Convenience

Walk In the Park - Beach House

Toothpaste Kisses - The Maccabees

We Both Go Down Together (Live) - The Decemberists

Lovesong - The Cure

Will the Night - Low

A Stone - Okkervil River

Magic in the Air - Badly Drawn Boy

1999 - Active Child

Just Like Honey - The Jesus And Mary Chain

Venice - The Lighthouse and The Whaler

Thirteen - Big Star

Silver Soul - Beach House

I’ll Melt With You - Nouvelle Vague

I Think Ur a Contra - Vampire Weekend

Wedding Bell - Beach House

Ambulance - TV on the Radio

Samson - Regina Spektor

Do You Realize?? - The Flaming Lips

Flume - Bon Iver

Love and Some Verses - Iron & Wine

23 - Blonde Redhead

Playground Love (with Gordon Tracks) - Air

Leisure Suite - Feist

Thinking About You - Radiohead

Dead Sound - The Raveonettes

Sentimental Heart - She & Him

Real Love - Beach House

Baby - Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti

We Might Be Dead by Tomorrow - Soko

The Apocalypse Song - St. Vincent

Open - Rhye

I Love My Old Bird Dog (& I Love You Too) - Single - Crossin Dixon

I’ll Be Yr Bird - M. Ward

New Slang - The Shins

Little Bit - Lykke Li

Secret Heart - Feist

The Fall - Rhye

Bluish - Animal Collective

Love More - Sharon Van Etten

Little Garçon - Born Ruffians

Red Right Ankle - The Decemberists

Part One - Band of Horses

Slow Show - The National

Rawnald Gregory Erickson the Second - STRFKR

Pulling Our Weight - The Radio Dept.

You You You You You - The 6ths

Your Arms Around Me - Jens Lekman

You Really Got a Hold On Me - She & Him

Dreams-Come-True-Girl (feat. Karen Black) - Cass McCombs

The Killing Moon - Echo & The Bunnymen

Sweet Darlin’ - She & Him

The Book of Love - The Magnetic Fields

Fantasy - The xx

Tonight - Lykke Li

The Trapeze Swinger - Iron & Wine

Dance For You - Dirty Projectors

One Evening - Feist

(I Want You) More Than Ever - The Clientele

Creature Fear - Bon Iver

The Sweetest Thing - Camera Obscura

Lover - Devendra Banhart

Heart Skipped a Beat - The xx

Us - Regina Spektor

U - Mikky Ekko

Companions - The Dodos

No One’s Gonna Love You - Band of Horses

Love Always Remains - MGMT

Passenger Seat - Death Cab for Cutie

Nightswimming - R.E.M.

Close to Me - The Cure

Such Great Heights - The Postal Service

Paris 2004 - Peter Bjorn and John

Cherry Blossom Girl (Hope Sandoval Version) - Air

Prisoners - J Mascis & Sharon Van Etten

Angels - The xx

If She Wants Me - Belle and Sebastian

Faded from the Winter - Iron & Wine

Shelter - The xx

Take You On a Cruise - Interpol

10news.dk
Interpol: allowing citizens to carry guns in public is most effective way to prevent terror attacks

“How long would the jihadis at Charlie Hebdo, Westgate, Mumbai – and many other terror attacks to come – be able to continue killing if they were surrounded by armed citizens? Interpol states that the only way to stop such attacks is to allow citizens to carry arms (the only alternative to an armed citizenry is ‘extraordinary security’ surrounding every area where many people meet – train stations, super markets, schools, etc. – which is of course completely unrealistic). If guns are illegal, only violent criminals, fanatic jihadis and our over-worked, understaffed police will have them.”

From 10 News

8

Act Natural: The Portraits of Music Photographer @tomspray

To see more of Tom Spray’s music photography, check out @tomspray on Instagram. For more music stories, check out @music.

There’s this one shot of Interpol. The image is monochrome, head-on, austere and if its striking shadow dance evokes the music of the band, then so too does it reflect the vision of the man behind the camera.

England-raised, Denmark-based music photographer Tom Spray (@tomspray) has photographed everyone from Pussy Riot to the Rolling Stones. Despite the breadth of his work, his portfolio has recurring themes, like spontaneity, nature and – as with Interpol – intimacy.

“I like to capture a natural expression on people,” says Tom, who has just returned from an assignment for the music website Pitchfork that saw him tasked with snapping “portrait, candid and atmospheric shots” at Spain’s Primavera festival. That’s where he ensnared Interpol (among others) – but not before he captured Tyler, The Creator, looking all in-your-face, up close and pensive.

Did Tom have time to bond with Tyler before he raised the lens? “God no,” he says with a laugh. “Tyler arrived about 30 minutes before his set, and I think he was trying to recreate some sort of Compton hanging-out-on-the-front-porch vibe with his crew. So I just approached him and asked if I could take a few frames. It was against this really ugly concrete backdrop and there was absolutely zero light. I did it all within about 30 seconds, but I hope I still captured who Tyler, The Creator is – albeit within a very short frame.”

Tom’s portraits are deceptively casual. He prefers to snap mid-conversation, rather than setting up elaborate poses. (Which is just as well, as he’s rarely granted the chance for the latter on festival shoots.) In doing so, he effectively catches people unaware, and they reveal something in return.

“I’ve been doing quite a lot of tight framing and low depth of field on individuals recently,” he says. “That gives you this extremely intimate vibe. It’s almost like me with my lens pressed up against your face, which is extremely intrusive, but at the same time you capture a sort of vulnerability about a person when you break down a barrier like that.”

Perhaps that’s what’s so remarkable about the Interpol shot: they appear closer, their features larger. They seem less untouchable.

“Again, the Interpol shot was very rushed,” recalls Tom. “Daniel [Kessler] the guitarist was very ill, and there was this whole media circus around, trying to get them to say a few words on camera. It was all very chaotic.” None of this is evident in the photograph. Its atmosphere appears to be one of absolute calm. “That’s the beauty of photography,” he nods.

Interpol has long drawn comparisons with Joy Division, whose bleak aesthetic was infamously captured in monochrome by Anton Corbijn. Is he a reference point of sorts for Tom? “Yeah, Anton Corbijn’s someone I have a lot of respect for,” he says. “And Annie Leibovitz, especially her ‘70s and ‘80s stuff.”

Tom’s style and approach is entirely his own, but there are shades of Leibovitz’s ‘80s-era flair for bold color in his work – particularly a bright and surprisingly floral portrait of Swedish pop livewire Robyn.

“I took that at Pitchfork Festival in Paris in 2012,” recalls Tom. “I got to build my own studio on-site, so it was taken under controlled lighting. Robyn was extremely easy to work with – you don’t really have to direct her – she’s quite playful and goes with the flow. We gave her a bouquet of flowers …” She wields them like a weapon.

Tom’s photos often raise a smile – Robyn’s floral arsenal; Black Lips’ leery, wine-wielding all-nighter – but few are more heartening than his portrait of blues and funk troubadour Charles Bradley, his smiling eyes brimming with tales untold. “That’s one of my favorite shots from last year,” Tom offers. “It was at Primavera again, but he came up to my hotel room, and we just hung out for half an hour. We chatted much more than I took photos.”

Tom’s love for seizing spontaneous moments works well in the live arena too – from a picture of Syrian street-folk star Omar Souleyman with the jumping masses reflected in his mirror sunglasses, to a mid-mosh pit shot during the Roskilde Festival set of black metal band Hexis.

“It’s pretty much all down to light and luck,” says Tom with a laugh. What he does not say is that it takes a patient hand to capture a person’s essence; that it takes a brave man to square up to Tyler, The Creator; that it takes a keen eye to capture the magic of music. But seeing is believing.

– Nicola Meighan for Instagram @music