international women's day

My girl is holy, is sacred, is pure, is clean, is loved, is whole, is beautiful, is worthy, is okay, is alone, is just fine just the way you are girl just the way you look babe with that dirty mouth and those hands, wherever they have been and that sadness, whatever caused it and that anger, wherever it came from and that fear, who ever brought it you are my girl, girl, you are me.” - Warsan Shire.  Happy International Women’s Day! 

Why do women need a whole day about them?

Because Ada Lovelace wrote instructions for the first computer program in the mid-1800s and I had no idea.

Because, F. Scott Fitzgerald plagiarized his wife, Zelda’s writing and used it in The Great Gatsby and his other books.

Because, black women, let alone any women, were not aware of the great contributions Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson made towards NASA and the space program.

Because the current president of the United States is a self proclaimed ‘pussy grabber’.

Because doctors (both men and women) are only NOW seeming to realize that women patients cannot be treated based on male patient information.

Because basic products cost more for women than they do for men.

Because feminine hygiene products are taxed.

Because Renee Richards existed before Kaitlyn Jenner and she fought policy in the NY Supreme Court, but she doesn’t get talked about.

Because Marsha P Johnson was basically removed from a movie about the Stonewall riots.

Because there STILL aren’t decent pockets in most women’s clothes.

Because Maria TallChief founded the Chicago ballet, but I’m sure most young girls who dream of being a ballerina don’t know about her.

Because Frida Kahlo and Georgia O’Keefe were amazing artists and people, but they weren’t the only female painters in history.

Because Evelyn Glennie is the first person in history to successfully create and sustain a full-time career as a solo percussionist.

Because Crystal R. Emery’s documentary, “Black Women in Medicine,” was amazing and should be seen by more people.

Because men are still determining how and when my body should and can be used and function.

Should I go on?

Edited to add differently abled women who rock the world too.

today is  #internationalwomensday in russia so here’s to the women of the world who fight for our rights every day, you’re amazing 

[EDITED] thank you to those who messaged me about the original slogan on the t-shirt, i didn’t know about it’s history and did a mistake by including it on garnet’s shirt.

i apologize for this and i will do my best to become more educated in the future. thank you for your patience.

Happy International Women’s Day to all women

To trans women, to women of color, to queer women, to disabled women, to fat women, to poor women.

To women of all cultures and societies, who all have their own unique struggles for their rights as women.

To people of marginalized genders who feel their connection to womanhood is important to them.

International Women’s Day is for all women. International Women’s Day is for all people of marginalized genders who value their connection to womanhood.

Happy International Women’s Day. I love you.

Today is International Women’s Day.

Today also marks the show of solidarity for women’s rights by way of a strike: A Day Without A Woman. Women around the world are refusing to take part in both paid and unpaid labor in the name of justice for all gender-oppressed people of all ethnicities, religions, and sexualities. In doing so, they join the ranks of women who have led protests, strikes, and movements throughout history.

Let’s celebrate a few of those women:

Dorothy Height (March 24, 1912—April 20, 2010)

Originally posted by womenthrive

Dorothy Height, former President of the National Council of Negro Women, was one of the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington. She stood near Martin Luther King Jr. during his “I Have a Dream” speech, but did not publicly speak that day. In fact, no woman publicly spoke. “Even on the morning of the march there had been appeals to include a woman speaker,” wrote Height in her memoir. “They were happy to include women in the human family, but there was no question as to who headed the household!“ In 1971, she helped found the National Women’s Political Caucus with other notable feminists like Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.

Marsha P. Johnson (August 24, 1945—July 6, 1992)

Originally posted by dannisue

Marsha P. Johnson spent her entire adult life fighting for the rights of LGBTQ people. She’s credited for being one of the first to fight back in the Stonewall Riots. She started the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries with her friend Sylvia Rivera. Together they provided food, shelter, and care to young drag queens, trans women, and homeless children in need in the Lower East Side of NYC. She fought for what was right, and knew how to live life with exuberance and humor. When asked by a judge what what the “P” stood for, she replied “Pay It No Mind.”

Alice Paul (January 11, 1885—July 9, 1977)

Originally posted by taryndraws

Alice Paul was one of the leading forces behind the Nineteenth Amendment, which affirmed and enshrined a woman’s right to vote. She rallied 8,000 people to march in the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington—no small task in a world before the internet—with an estimated half million people watching the historic moment from the sidelines.

And some good activist blogs to follow:

  • Emily’s List (@emilys-list) slogan is “ignite change.” They aim to do so by backing pro-choice candidates for US office in key races across the country.
  • Women of Color in Solidarity (@wocinsolidarity) focuses on being a hub for the the WOC experience in the US. Original posts, incredibly informative reblogs…this place is wonderful.